Sony New V Series LCD - Page 31 - AVS Forum
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post #901 of 922 Old 11-20-2005, 07:19 AM
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sbkid: I purchased the same set from Sears and received it yesterday (although I've learned that discussing actual prices is frowned on here)

On the advice of this forum, I purchased the Sanus Systems VMPL250B Universal 30"-50" Flat-Panel Mount (black of course). Can be found in various B&M and on line, although I got mine from buy.com and received a couple days later

Still waiting on my cable card, although the set does pull in some digital HD channels (I do not have a set top box)

PBS in HD last night was amazing, as was the Harry Potter movie on ABC.
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post #902 of 922 Old 11-20-2005, 10:40 PM
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Ray-dude,

Thanks for the recommendation on the wall mount.

I have had the set for 2 days now. I watched the pro games in HD on Cox Cable today. The quality of the video was very impressive. Even my wife commented on how good it was, i.e. almost 3 dimensional. I still need to tweak the controls, especially the backlight intensity to optimize the picture. I plugged my laptop into the set and with a wireless keyboard and mouse, I was able to use the set as a large external monitor. Neat!! I also, on the advice of someone on this thread, plugged my card reader into the usb input and was able to view the photos on the CF cards. Another neat feature.

I called Cox Cable yesterday. They will be installing the cable card next Saturday. It's quite a rip-off. They charge $60 to program and install the card. After that, it's $1.50 per month for the rental of the card.
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post #903 of 922 Old 11-25-2005, 09:26 AM
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Has there been any new information on the 46" version?

Thanks.
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post #904 of 922 Old 12-03-2005, 10:16 AM
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I have had the V series 40" Sony now for about 2 weeks and I am very satisfied with the PQ. The PQ on the HD channels are spectacular. I use the cable card to receive the Cox Cable digital signal since this set is my second set for the bedroom. My first set is in the family room and receives the digital signal through a Cox Cable DVR box. I can view HD in both rooms.

One feature that I miss in viewing the TV in the bedroom is the interactive program guide. It's too bad that one of the compromises with the cable card is that it is one way and does not receive the program guide that the DVR cable box provides. The ability to instantly play back or record any program with the push of a button is also a great feature to have.

Thinking about the problem, I have come up with a possible solution. What if I run a length of component (YCB) cable from the DVR box in my living room to my bedroom and connect it to the Sony V series via one of the component inputs? I could parallel the outputs at the DVR box so that my living room set would not be affected. In addition, in the bedroom, I could tune in to the digital signal either through the cable card input or switch to the component input to watch the signal from the DVR box. Controlling the DVR box from the bedroom would not be a problem since I could purchase one of the readily available wireless remote controls.

My thought was to run the component cable through the attic. The run would be about 50 ft in length. Here is the key question. Can the DVR output drive a cable 50 feet long? Would there be a loss in signal quality, especially the HD signal? I was thinking of purchasing two high quality component cables that were 25 feet in length and connecting them together.

My feeling is that the capacitance of any high quality component cable should be low enough that there should not be any appreciable signal loss.

I would appreciate any thoughts on the approach that I outlined above. Also any info on where I could purchase high quality, low capacitance component cables in the 25 foot or longer length would be appreciated.
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post #905 of 922 Old 12-03-2005, 07:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin Credible
Has there been any new information on the 46" version?

Thanks.
Sony's new Head Honcho is giving the Intro Keynote next month. I'm sure he will have somthing to say one way or another. Since Sony doesn't have any consumer flat screens over 40" in the US, the odds are that there will be somthing announced.
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post #906 of 922 Old 12-04-2005, 12:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sbkid
component cable through the attic ... about 50 ft in length. Here is the key question. Can the DVR output drive a cable 50 feet long?
I have multiple cables through my attic about 40-50 feet, but don't have a new TV to test it with. I can only say that composite isn't too good; component would have to be better, but I wouldn't guess it'd be as good as using the cablecard.

I'd also guess you'd still have a "remote" problem, trying to control the box in the other room. Can be done, but not necessarily well.

fwiw, given the run, I used top rated, extra-shielded coax with RCA connectors on the ends. I read somewhere at the time that coax was better than regular cables for long runs; maybe special-purpose cable is available now for that, though.

An alternative trick, though lower res, is to feed the output to an RF modulator which can inject the signal back into the TV cable signal. My experience it that such devices can work well, but can also be tricky -- if the RF modulator detects any signal it'll inject it, which will override the target channel (3 or 4) and cause static on all the others. I have this setup so I can watch entertainment room VCR/DVD on bedroom TV, but I usually leave it disconnected and unplugged from the power outlet. I almost never watch TV in the bedroom anyway (it can become a bad habit).

Craig in NJ
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post #907 of 922 Old 12-04-2005, 01:10 AM
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CraiginNJ,

Thanks for your feedback. Subsequent to my post, I searched the Web and found several sources of high-grade component cables in 50' lengths. These component cables have 3 high quality RCA plugs for the Y,C, B connection on each end. Given that 50' lengths are sold, it appears that connecting a cable box to a TV set with a 50' length should be OK.

On the question of the remote, my son-in-law has one of the inexpensive rf links from Radio Shack. The link consists of a transmitter and receiver unit. You aim your remote at the transmitter unit. It converts the IR code into a rf signal. The rf signal is then picked up by the receiver unit which re emits the IR code at the remote location. I have experimented with this unit and its range is more than adequate for my application. However, I did notice that this unit adds a slight delay in the response of the remote control.

Another option that I thought of is to obtain one of the IR re-emitters that are sold. They are used to control stereo equipment inside a cabinet where the IR receiver window is blocked. I could in principle buy one of these units and run a 50' wire from the bedroom to the remote cable box and control the cable box from the bedroom. Has anyone tried this?

sbkid
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post #908 of 922 Old 12-05-2005, 05:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sbkid
found several sources of high-grade component cables in 50' lengths.
Hopefully they are shielded cables. Attics tend to have power cables running all over. I think it isn't so bad to cross power cables, but I thought I read somewhere that running parallel to them can pick up noise.

Craig in NJ
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post #909 of 922 Old 12-16-2005, 11:01 AM
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Craig in NJ

I have decided on another approach to be able to connect my 40xbr LCD to the cable box in the family room. I was originally going to run the component cable through the attic. However, it dawned upon me that not only would you have to run the component cable but you would need two cables for the audio or a total of 5 cables. Instead, I will be purchasing a HDMI cable. They come in 50' lengths. With the HDMI cable, a single cable will digitally carry both the video and audio.

One question: Any thoughts on a problem of running 50' HDMI cable? Any possibility of signal degradation?
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post #910 of 922 Old 12-17-2005, 08:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sbkid
it dawned upon me that not only would you have to run the component cable but you would need two cables for the audio or a total of 5 cables. Instead, I will be purchasing a HDMI cable. They come in 50' lengths. With the HDMI cable, a single cable will digitally carry both the video and audio. Any thoughts on a problem of running 50' HDMI cable? Any possibility of signal degradation?
I don't know, but I can tell you that I'd have preferred trying that so I could have fewer thick cables between my PC and entertainment system. DMI and HDMI didn't exist at the time. It's sure worth a try. 50' does seem a bit far for a bundle of thin wires like that, so there might be some signal degradation, but not necessarily worse than separate cables. With component video I thought I read that some signals carry over the long distance better than others, so there's was always the possibly that red or blue might come through noticably weaker or even slightly out of sync. I don't know if that was a real issue or not over 50', and don't know whether it would apply to DMI/HDMI. I do notice degradation of composite video over 50', but component and DMI/HDMI should be much better.

The issues I see have to do with mechanics -- drilling angles & building codes so you don't create a big risk damaging your house!

1. You'll need holes in your wall headers (double-stacked 2x4's) to get into the attic, and to minimize the loss of structural integrity you'll want to match the shape of the cable(s) as tightly as practical, which will be hard with the prefab cable with HDMI connector built on because it's not round. You probably need an oblong hole leaving as much wood on either side as possible.

There's building code regulations about how much wood you need on either side for both structural & electrical reasons. (Imagine an bad storm shaking the house, or someone putting storage in an attic wasn't build to hold storage weight, or imagine someone screwing or nailing a cabinet or something onto the wall into those 2x4's with extra long nails/screws.) I managed to comply despite having a lot of coax cables, so you should be able to do okay. My exterior wall headers were 6" wide, which gave me extra room, and my interior wall headers weren't really load-bearing and could take a couple of small bundles of cables leaving barely enough wood on either side as long as I drilled my holes perfectly straight down the middle.

I'd recommend trying to make an oblong hole, put the HDMI head through, then slip through other cables with smaller heads. The other way around would require an unnecessarily big hole.

2. My experience is that without some kind of angle guide you are aren't likely to be able to drill exactly straight down through the middle of the headers like you'll want to. If you try to drill the oblong hole by starting by making two separate holes and then merge between them, those two starter holes could be on surprisingly different angles! Sounds like you've got a challenge. In my case I had the drywall already cut open so I could see where the holes were coming out inside, so I could start with a small hole and then enlarge it when I was sure I had the angle right. (It took a couple of tries.)

My exterior wall was a pain. Having the drywall cut open was also important because cables won't just snake through the insulation on their own. I had my wall outlet hole down at normal level plus made a temporary approx 12"x12" cutout up near the top of the wall. The insulation consists of both fiberglass batting and sealing plastic and it is there for a building code reason. Since the plastic was on the inside and hole was on the outside, I had to come through all of that and reseal the plastic tightly. (I'd recommend special ductwork mastic tape which is permanent; ordinary duct tape dries out & falls off, and building codes no longer accept duct tape to be used for ducts in much of the country!) Of course, I had the added work of sealing up the cutout later, incl. spackling & sanding & paint priming. (I eventually my room, so the final painting of the entire wall is something I've have done anyway.)

2b. Another reason the exterior wall was a pain was that the roof line left only inches of headroom for working at the header. But I needed headroom up there for the long drill bit & drill body. I found an L-angle adapter so I could accomplish the job, but even with that it wasn't easy, and you can understand why it was very very hard to keep the angle of the hole from drifting from the middle of the wood. I was grateful to have my cutout in top of the drywall so I see what drilling angles I wound up with.

3. Also, you have to seal any holes to the attic with "firestop" or alternative material. I recommend the firestop caulk (with a caulk "gun") -- the red stuff (I think there's also a yellow version). Holes in headers are like little chimneys. If you have a fire in a wall (i.e., common eletrical wiring fire) you need your walls sealed tight. This firecode requirement didn't exist when my place was build, but any new work or changes are required to comply. (As an extra defense, I made sure I ran my cable down wall stud spaces where there were no electrical cables that might start a fire or cause interference with my signal cables.)


Good luck,

Craig in NJ
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post #911 of 922 Old 12-17-2005, 02:44 PM
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Craig in NJ,

Thanks for the info on the building code requirements when stringing cables in the attic. Your information was very informative, especially the point about needing to caulk all holes as a firestop.

One additional question I have. Someone told me today that if you use the HDMI output from the SA cable box, you will not have any control over the brightness, contrasts, sharpness, etc, whereas with the component connection, you still retains this flexibility. Is this true? Sounds like a bunch of horse to me but that's what one audio-video store owner told me today. He said that he uses only the component video connection rather than the HDMI because of this reason.
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post #912 of 922 Old 12-18-2005, 04:34 AM
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I think we need someone with experience with HDMI to answer that qn. I would sure like to know, too.
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post #913 of 922 Old 12-20-2005, 09:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin Credible
Has there been any new information on the 46" version?

Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mkconley
Sony's new Head Honcho is giving the Intro Keynote next month. I'm sure he will have somthing to say one way or another. Since Sony doesn't have any consumer flat screens over 40" in the US, the odds are that there will be somthing announced.
Whoa!!!

Are they thinking of going head-on with the 45' inch Sharp Aquos???

If so, then I do hope they make an announcement.

Just imagine, with the current price tag of the LC-45GX6U @ 450,000+ pesos (in the Philippines that is), a launching of a Sony Bravia V series 46 inch could blow the Aquos 45 out of the water.

Shrap Philippines is pricing the Aquos too much. It's just as expensive as its counterparts such as the Panasonic Viera and the Philips LCD with Ambilight & Pixe Plus 2.

Ha, they think it would be better to price them high to earn more out of each sale by putting high 300k-mid 400k price tags.

Now that Sony PH released the KLV-V40A10, which only costs 280k here, the competitors are losing big because of their Draconian-like pricing schemes.

Heck, it's no wonder why Sony continues to be the undisputed market leader of Flat Panel Television screens in the country.
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post #914 of 922 Old 12-20-2005, 09:25 PM
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To all,

I have had the Bravia 40XBR LCD for about a month now. I purchased the Sanus mounting bracket that was recommended on this thread and have successfully mounted the LCD in the bedroom. I mounted a recepticle behind the set for AC power and also brought in the cable from the attic and mounted an outlet behind the LCD. The installation looks great!

I am using the cable card and found that while its great to eliminate the need for the Cox HD cable box, I find that I do miss the program guide that the cable box provides. I also miss the access to the DVR feature to instantaneously record or program recordings and play them back that the DVR cable box provides.

Rather than getting a second cable box, I have come up with an approach which I know will work and recommend to others. I have not implemented it yet but I believe that it will indeed work. The approach is as follows. I plan to run a HDMI cable from my Cox DVR cable box in the family room to the bedroom and the LCD. The run will be about 50' through the attic. I have found several sources on the WEB including Monoprice that sell HDMI cables in 50' lenghts. Monoprice also sells 2 set HDMI coupler that I will use to connect the cable box to my TV in the family room and also to the 50' cable that will go to the bedroom.

To control the cable box from the bed room, I have found the ideal solution. There is a company called Buffalo Electronics that manufactures a IR control system consisting of infrared repeater, an emitter, power supply, and a connecting block for the IR emitters. You mount the infrared repeater next to the remote television and run a signal wire to the connecting block, mounted near the other TV. When you use the remote in the remote location, the IR signal is picked up and then sent by wire to the connecting block and then re-emitted at the cable box. The Buffalo Electronics IR components are also sold at Smart House and other locations on the Web or you can order them directly from Buffalo Electronics. I find this to be a more robust and direct approach rather using the RF based pyramid repeater that you can purchase from Radio Shack or Circuit City for about $45.00.

In my opinion, this is a great way to have full access to the cable box in another room. Also, with the cable card, it turns out that I can now watch one program on one channel and record 2 other independent channels on the DVR at the same time. Remember that the DVR box has 2 tuners and the cable card is the 3rd tuner which makes this possible.
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post #915 of 922 Old 12-22-2005, 09:31 AM
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I'm about to pull the trigger on the Bravia 40".

Can someone recommend which cables I should get -- completely confused after doing some research :)

I will hook the TV up to a:
- HD DVR ( time warner cable, 8300HD )
- a future xbox 360
- a home theatre sound system ( receiver is a Yamaha HTR 5640 )
- a progressive scan DVD player ( Yamaha DV-S5650 )
- possibly output from a powerbook laptop ( for slideshows and the like )

thanks.
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post #916 of 922 Old 12-22-2005, 11:38 AM
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The 40" Bravia comes with a RGB cable for hooking up to a computer. It's about 3 ft in length. You will also need a set of component and audio cables or a HDMI cable to connect your box to the Bravia. I assume that your cable box has a HDMI output. My Cox DVR cable box does have an HDMI output and it work fine.
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post #917 of 922 Old 12-23-2005, 05:07 AM
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Guys I just bought 40" Bravia V series.

I remember I happene to come across a thread or a post that gives you out the best possible TV configuration in terms of picture contrast.

Do you know where it is now?


Thanks,
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post #918 of 922 Old 12-29-2005, 09:59 AM
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I've had my 40 in Bravia for a few months now and have been generally pretty impressed. The two areas that I think it is really impressive are the black levels and richness in color.
However, I have one major problem that I'm hoping might be fixable which is 2 stuck pixels that appeared right after I bought my unit. I thought over time they may disappear but unfortunately they haven't. Has anyone else had this problem and been able to fix it? It doesn't really effect the overall picture and some don't even notice them but it is really annoying considering how much I spent. Any help would be greatly appreciated
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post #919 of 922 Old 12-29-2005, 11:42 AM
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Have you solved this problem of the pixels yet?

Thanks
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post #920 of 922 Old 01-03-2006, 07:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by regis169
Guys I just bought 40" Bravia V series.

I remember I happene to come across a thread or a post that gives you out the best possible TV configuration in terms of picture contrast.

Do you know where it is now?


Thanks,
For those of you on this board who have this TV, what settings do you have it on?

You might want to pick up Digital Video Essentials, but here are my settings.
My DVD player is connected via Component (progressive scan is OFF), and my DishNetwork PVR via S-Video. DVE was used to calibrate the picture.
Here are my current settings...

Custom Picture Mode Settings (S-Video/Component/Cable)
Backlight -------------- 8 / 8 / 8
Picture ---------------- Max / Max / Max
Brightness ------------ 65 / 56 / 56
Color ----------------- 56 / 51 / 50
Hue ------------------- G1 / 0 / 0
Color Temp ------------ N / N / N
Sharpness ------------ 40 / 25 / 50
Noise Reduction ------- Med / Off / Low
DRC Mode ------------- HD / HD / HD
DRC Palette ----------- R50,C38 / Def / Def
Black Corrector ------- High / High / High
Contrast Enhancer ---- Low / Low / Low
Gamma --------------- Off / Med / Low
Clear White ----------- High / High / High
Live Color ------------- Off / Low / Low
Color Space ----------- Wide / Wide / Wide
Game Mode ----------- Off / Off / Off
Power Saving --------- S / S / S
Light Sensor ---------- On / On / On
CineMotion ----------- Auto / Auto / Auto
:cool:
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post #921 of 922 Old 01-07-2006, 04:49 PM
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proud new owner of the 40" bravia model.

a real nice TV, and just got the DVR 8300HD from TimeWarner Cable all hooked up. Using an HDMI cable.

Will probably get this TV calibrated soon, but was wondering if anyone with an HDMI setup could share their settings ? I tried the ones above that 'tom_01' is using, but find it a bit too bright ...

thanks
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post #922 of 922 Old 01-16-2006, 01:10 AM
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I plan to connect my SA HD DVR box to my 40" Bravia in the bedroom. I plan to use a HDMI cable. the length of the run will be about 50'. I have ordered a 50' length from MonoCable.

My questions is the following: Will the 50' run be a problem? Again, they sell 50' lengths so I assume that 50' runs should not result in a degradation. I plan to test the run first by connecting the Bravia to the SA HD DVR box before I thread the cable through the attic. In addition to determining whether there is any degradation in video quality, this will test to determine whether the audio is OK on all of the cable channels.

Any comments and thoughts would be appreciated.
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