MEMS-based displays (TMOS/DMS) news thread - Page 4 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #91 of 137 Old 11-07-2008, 07:29 AM
TNG
AVS Special Member
 
TNG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: East Bay Area CA
Posts: 1,622
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
I find it interesting that there was no contrast ratio mentioned and the fact that the 2 prototypes shown there were ~2" screens?

On a small screen low contrast ratio is harder to recognize.

On the viability of building a small panel of even 32" as a first product, MEMs are difficult to build. The TFT backplane is now well understood and yes can use typical LCD manufacturing processes, but you are making it sound as though just the addition of the "polymer" layer.

My question is what is the polymer? Please be specific, if you have chemical properties that would be great. How thick is the polymer layer? Again please be specific. What manufacturing steps have to be done to this layer to make your "shutters"? What is the equipment involved (model numbers and again specifics please)? How many litho steps does the polymer layer undergo until it is finished?

What I am trying to say is that there is allot more involved than what you are implying. I have been involved with the manufacturing process of TFT panels for several years now and have had to troubleshoot may problems and processes, it really is just not that easy. What allot of people here on AVS don't seem to realize is that you can't just throw money at a product and make it work. Allot of these ideas are explored by startups and large players alike until they go big or they hit a dead end that they can't get past.

DMD (DLP) works because it is done on a small scale. It is a chip. Hundreds are made on a wafer at a time and if there are defects in several on the wafer it has no effect on the others, the bad are discarded and the good ones sold. DMS would have to be a large scale MEMs, on panels where 1 or 2 bad pixels would kill the whole thing. Also there is a scaling issue. What are the size of each shutter on the screens shown in the example panels? If we scale up those panels to again 32" TVs and make them Full 1080 HD, what does the size of each shutter need to be then and will that size lend itself easily to manufacturing?
TNG is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #92 of 137 Old 11-11-2008, 11:03 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
vtms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 997
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 16
http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20081112VL200.html
MEMS-based digital micro shutters as an alternative to LCD: Q&A with display start-up Pixtronix founder Nesbitt Hagood
Quote:


Pixtronix, a US-based start-up with a staff size of about 45, claims it has been doing what everyone else in the flat panel display industry has been trying to achieve: low-cost and energy-saving solutions without trading off picture quality. After three years of product development since the company's establishment in 2005, Pixtronix is now looking for manufacturing partners to produce its MEMS-based display using its own Digital Micro Shutter (DMS) technology. The display has a similar architecture to that of an LCD panel, but it uses micro shutters instead of liquid crystals. And unlike LCDs, DMS displays do not need polarizers or color filters. Pixtronix founder, CTO and president Nesbitt Hagood stresses that DMS displays have better light transmission efficiency than LCDs, hence lower power consumption. He claims that the manufacturing costs of DMS displays will be 10% less than those for LCDs.

Last month, Pixtronix unveiled its PerfectLight product line based on its DMS technology. Prior to that, Digitimes had the opportunity to talk to Hagood during his trip to Taiwan, one of the destinations where he was looking for manufacturing partners for the DMS displays.

Q: Can you give us some background information of Pixtronix?

A: Pixtronix is headquartered in Massachusetts. We've got 45 employees including a couple in Asia. We started in May 2005. We are in Taiwan looking for partners for investing and manufacturing.

We focus on taking existing infrastructure capabilities and know how of the TFT LCD industry and do it in a slightly different way and leverage the investment that has been made in that industry to allow this new technology to become competitive early on. Look at the development of LCDs and OLEDs that takes a long time and huge capital investments. So we've developed a way of producing displays that utilize the LCD investment to lower the capital needs.

We are a new display technology starting in mobile devices, going to larger format displays, as the manufacturing gets more mature. But what we offer is exceptional video image quality, as good as any competing displays in the market, but at a fraction of power consumption. That's critical need in mobile devices, particularly in the high-end multimedia handsets and portable devices. People do monochrome, which meets the needs of a large number of applications but not the ones that are really at the forefront of convergence on multimedia handsets, position-based applications, contents, web browsing, all those things that demand high quality multimedia displays.

Q: Can you describe Pixtronix's technology?

A: Our technology is called the Digital Micro Shutter (DMS). DMS is a MEMS-based device. Instead of using LCD cells, we use micro shutter technology. Very low power consumption and very low manufacturing costs. No color filters, no polarizers, no liquid crystals. But we're adding a few process steps. With MEMS we take a lot out on a lower cost basis. We're now demonstrating 18-bit color, 105% NTSC ratio, 170 viewing angle, high color saturation and high contrast ratio.

There's been a tradeoff between image quality and power consumption. In the US every new service offered by telecom carriers is video-centric, even text messaging. Displays are now with higher resolution, larger screens, more deep colors, more video capability. Screen is a primary interface. One major OEM once said that new devices are nothing but batteries and screens. Bigger screens, better technology and faster devices mean you need more power hungry chipsets.

For a typical 2.5-inch display module, we are one quarter of the power consumption for TFT LCD or OLED displays currently available in the market. TFT LCD has a throughput of 6-8%, whereas our display has a 60-80% throughput depending on the design of the pixels. So, much higher optical throughput, and that gives you lower power consumption. That's core advantage, and then you've got great image quality because of the RGB LED light sources, providing very deep color gamut, two times the color gamut usually seen in other TFT LCD mobile devices.

Q: How does DMS work?

A: We have only one pixel for all three colors in a time-sequential color display. Each pixel is one micro shutter. It is fabricated on top of TFT backplanes, and uses the same equipment, materials and processes to form a MEMS device rather than a transistor. It is also a simple process to build that on top of the glass. It's a very low-cost manufacturing process. These MEMS devices are very robust and reliable - 40 billion cycles on displays, but no change in performance whatsoever. In contrast with other MEMS displays, there are no in-operation issues. The architecture is fundamentally different.

Q: How different is DMS from other MEMS displays?

A: There are different kinds of MEMS display technologies. We have a little shutter that moves back and forth. It doesn't come down and stick to the substrate and then pop back up. And in that difference is our increased reliability and performance. We have electrodes which open it and close it. So we can command it open and command it close. We don't have that kind of in-operation friction that has been an issue for other MEMS devices in the past. Other MEMS displays may have two layers that are separated to form an interference pattern. When they are closed they make it dark. They usually use electrostatic forces to stick things together. But electrostatic forces can't unstick things. So they rely on springs to unstick them. The thicker you make the spring, the more reliable the separation, the higher voltage and more power consumption to take it down. You're always fighting a battle. And you always make a system that tends to stick, and it's very difficult manufacturing to make them unstick. With one-sided actuation systems you have a lot of friction and in-operation reliability issues. But our system, because we have two-side latch switches that open and close, you end up with a lot more reliability.

Q: How different is DMS from LCD and OLED

A: DMS is a digital system, unlike LCD or OLED which are analog modulators. That creates a lot of advantages for us. If you look at a digital system, you don't need to get all the transistors uniform. One of the problems with OLED is you need to get all the transistors uniform across the array. Our system is a digital backplane. It is very easy to make the backplane. Likewise the MEMS is also digital. You just have to be opened and closed; you don't need that uniform springs. The manufacturing on the mechanical side is also easier. On top of that, because we are completely digital, it's under the chip control as an algorithm table. We can tell the display to operate as a monochrome text, or 3-bit color, or 8-bit color, it's all the same system. We get a truly programmable system whose output can be adjusted for ambient environment, or for specific applications.

Q: How good is DMS under direct sunlight?

A: It's great. It's a very bright display, it has got very high optical throughput. We can make it very bright in high ambient environment. It is much better than TFT LCD.

Q: Can you tell us how different is a DMS display from a TFT LCD in terms of architecture and manufacturing?

A: We've kept ourselves to older generation fabs, 5-micron design rules. But we can with the older equipment build very high resolution arrays. The general architecture is sheer glass with TFT design that makes the backplane. It is a standard process: a backplane works using TFT transistors. And then you build the MEMS devices afterward on that glass panel. This makes the MEMS on the glass one layer. Then you add a cover sheet called the aperture glass. The cover sheet has a mirror on it. And a small aperture is etched on the mirror. And if the aperture is closed, it's a dark pixel, and if the shutter moves away from the aperture, it's a light pixel. It's a biplane - two sheets of glass bonded together. We use TFT LCD panel line's bond capability, just like attaching color filters. We use the same equipment as in the manufacturing of TFT LCD cells.

There is a reason for the mirror on the aperture glass. Even though the aperture is only a small fraction of the cell area, we get a lot of light through because light bounces around and eventually comes out the hole. High throughput, no color filters, no polarizers to cut down the light.

The backlight is a conventional material, using RGB LEDs. The same cost structure as the one for TFT LCD backlight. We leverage existing TFT LCD manufacturing equipment, processed, and materials. But our manufacturing cost will be 10% less than that for LCDs.

Q: You're looking for partners among TFT LCD makers to make DMS. Are the TFT LCD makers capable of doing DMS?

A: Yes, we've developed a process flow so that any TFT LCD maker can do it. They probably don't have all the equipment needed, but the equipment is available from TFT LCD equipment suppliers. So only small capital investment is needed to convert a TFT LCD line to make DMS.

Q: What kind of partnership are you looking at? If the LCD makers work with Pixtronix, will there be a conflict between their own business and their partnerships with yours?

A: We're in discussion with a number of Asian manufacturers. We don't want to compete with TFT LCD manufacturers. But we are concentrating on fabs that are older and less competitive. We provide the TFT LCD manufacturers with higher-margin products. We are looking at products that are not in the manufacturers' product portfolio, and ours are high-resolution displays.

Q: Which market segment are you looking at?

A: Our initial market will focus on high-end multimedia applications, next-generation handsets, personal navigation devices (PNDs), and portable media players. We're also looking at digital still camera displays, and video camera displays. Since those require image quality, but they are mobile devices, their displays account for a significant fraction of power consumption. So our customers are those who want really high image quality, standard battery life, new features they can add on their products that they couldn't add on the power budget before.

We can scale to larger applications, such as laptops and desktop monitors, large-format screens that are designed to run on full HD systems. Our primary value will be lower-power consumption, as it is extremely important for laptops, and even larger-format TVs.

vtms is offline  
post #93 of 137 Old 12-01-2008, 06:47 PM
Advanced Member
 
Isochroma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 624
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
MEMS Display Manufactured by Roll-to-roll Printing
28 November 2008



The structure of the MEMS-based large flexible display (left)
and the principle of coloring (right)


The Institute of Industrial Science (IIS) of the University of Tokyo developed a MEMS display by using roll-to-roll printing technology.

It is a transmissive flexible display fabricated by attaching plastic films on which micro patterns are formed by printing. With the adoption of roll-to-roll process, the production cost per square meter can be reduced to several hundred yen (a few dollars), the institute said.

According to IIS, the display is not only bendable but also capable of easily redrawing images on the screen because it can electrostatically control the hue. Thus, it is suitable as an advertising medium on big pillars and building windows and in trains, enabling to change advertisement contents without going to the trouble of removing and replacing, the institute said.

The new display consists of an optical reflection film (12nm thick, aluminum) and an optical interference film (210-370mm thick, SiO2) formed on a plastic substrate of about 0.2mm thickness. It functions as a transmissive color filter when it is combined with an upper membrane (16μm thick) attached with the optical reflection film, while interposing an air layer surrounded by air-gap spacers (thickness: 0.6μm), the institute said.

The metal reflection film, which is also used for light reflection, is provided as an electrode to electrostatically drive the display. When a voltage is applied to the electrode, the upper thin membrane deforms toward the lower electrode while pushing down the air inside the air gaps. This changes the distance between the upper and lower metal reflection films, which determines the light wavelength, thereby changing the hue of transmitted light on the basis of the principle of Fabry-Perot interferometer, the institute said.

This time, the institute decided the thickness of the SiO2 optical interference film in such a way that the transmitted light looks gray when no drive voltage is applied while the colors of the interference film (red, green and blue) are visible when the display is driven.

In contrast to an LCD display, which consists of approximately 10 layers of patterned films, the new display can be composed of as few as six layers. Thus, the new display can be formed by a relatively easy process, the institute said. Moreover, the width of the display can be increased up to that of the web (paper feed mechanism) of a printing machine, according to the institute.

This time, in order to control the position of color emission, the institute is planning to form the addressing circuit by printing. Also, because the thickness of the air layer between the two sheets can be varied, the new technique has an advantage to change the light wavelength by static electricity. Thus, the institute expects that it can be applied to, for example, electronic shades to block UV light.

The research was chosen as one of the international projects of the Industrial Technology Research Grant Program promoted by Japan's New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), and jointly conducted by IIS and the Technical Research Center of Finland (VTT).
Isochroma is offline  
post #94 of 137 Old 12-19-2008, 04:21 PM
Advanced Member
 
Isochroma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 624
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
UniPixel to have Japanese maker produce thin-film products for TMOS display
18 December 2008

US-based UniPixel, the developer of a color display technology called Time Multiplexed Optical Shutter (TMOS), has announced that it will collaborate on its thin-film products with a large Japanese manufacturing company.

UniPixel will work closely with this firm on the high-volume production requirements of UniPixel's Opcuity film designs, including its finger print resistant (FPR) films for touch screens followed by active layer films for TMOS.

The collaborating firm is in several market segments including various chemicals, resins and high performance films and materials, and holds a leadership position providing materials and films used in the production of LCD panels, according to UniPlex.

Reed Killion, President and CEO of UniPixel, said, "While UniPixel has proven its ability to produce films in low volumes, we feel that we will need much higher capacity to support the touch screen market, which has been forecasted to exceed 800 million units within the next five years."

UniPixel's Opcuity FPR film can be applied to any touch screen surface to prevent finger prints, and also provides scratch protection and anti-glare. The Opcuity active layer film is the key element in its TMOS display architecture. As a polymer membrane based architecture, Opcuity is designed specifically for a TMOS display system.
Isochroma is offline  
post #95 of 137 Old 12-26-2008, 08:13 AM
Newbie
 
Herr Flick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Apeldoorn NL
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Did anyone mentioned that Philips showed her first prototype TMOS display (32 inch, 1 cm thick) at the German IFA 2008 consumer show in Berlin already in august 2008 ? So I do hope in 2009 I can buy my TMOS TV !
Herr Flick is offline  
post #96 of 137 Old 12-26-2008, 09:05 AM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
vtms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 997
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herr Flick View Post

Did anyone mentioned that Philips showed her first prototype TMOS display (32 inch, 1 cm thick) at the German IFA 2008 consumer show in Berlin already in august 2008 ? So I do hope in 2009 I can buy my TMOS TV !

The news report about this was wrong. That was a thin Philips LCD. We're still few years away from TMOS tvs.
vtms is offline  
post #97 of 137 Old 02-03-2009, 12:00 AM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
vtms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 997
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 16
This is huge. With Samsung on board, TMOS could be on a clear path to commercialization now.

http://techon.nikkeibp.co.jp/english...090203/165053/
Quote:


UniPixel Inc has signed a joint development agreement with Samsung Electronics. Under terms of the agreement, the parties will collaborate on advancing the development efforts around UniPixel's time multiplexed optical shutter (TMOS) display technology.

UniPixel's TMOS display technology is targeted at leveraging a subset of the current LCD manufacturing process. It is claimed to offer the potential to lower the bill of materials manufacturing costs by as much as 60% in some cases, while improving performance characteristics including lower power consumption and increased brightness over existing LCD and OLED flat panel display technologies.

Reed Killion, president and CEO of UniPixel, said the agreement with Samsung will help establish a development platform for TMOS that leverages Samsung's technology development expertise, process development expertise, manufacturing and assembly expertise, as well as provide access to resources and infrastructure.

vtms is offline  
post #98 of 137 Old 02-03-2009, 04:09 PM
Member
 
moreHD's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 171
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Hi,

Could MEMS tv give a better picture than OLED?
moreHD is offline  
post #99 of 137 Old 02-04-2009, 07:11 AM
Senior Member
 
guidryp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by moreHD View Post

Could MEMS tv give a better picture than OLED?

Very Unlikely.

It is unlikely to achieve pure off blacks like OLED. There will be light leakage around the micro shutters.

It has to potential color rainbows like DLP as it uses sequential color as well.

I think it will be decent for portable devices where ultimate image quality doesn't matter as much as power savings.
guidryp is offline  
post #100 of 137 Old 02-04-2009, 11:08 AM
Advanced Member
 
S. Hiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 994
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Love the price/performance of large screen DLP, but don't think I'd want sequential color for my computer monitor...

(Whereas I'd love to try a bunch of those 11" Sony OLEDs in a multimonitor arrangement if I were rich...)
S. Hiller is offline  
post #101 of 137 Old 02-04-2009, 12:08 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
vtms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 997
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by moreHD View Post

Could MEMS tv give a better picture than OLED?

Once the MEMS layer is optimized, I don't see why not.

Samsung's edge-lit backlights for this year's Luxia tvs will suit TMOS well. Then the only thing left to optimize is Opcuity layer as there's no other components left to improve because BLU + Opcuity = TMOS (MEMS layer replaces liquid crystal layer, polarizers and color filters found in LCDs). Even 1st gen. should be OLED-thin.

Samsungs' main motivation for making this deal is probably not PQ, but, most likely, the lower cost of making TMOS vs. LCDs plus the fact these panels will be using the tenth of energy LCDs use. In this economy, these aspects of display technology seem especially important.
vtms is offline  
post #102 of 137 Old 02-06-2009, 02:29 PM
Member
 
moreHD's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 171
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Thank you vtms !!!
moreHD is offline  
post #103 of 137 Old 02-06-2009, 03:16 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Richard Paul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 6,955
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by moreHD View Post

Hi,

Could MEMS tv give a better picture than OLED?

The Unipixel prediction of the contrast ratio for TMOS (4,500:1) is less than a hundredth of the contrast ratio advertised with current OLED displays (1,000,000:1). And since TMOS is in development there is no guarantee that it will be commercially released. On the other hand IMOD displays from Qualcomm are being sold today but this IMOD model has an advertised contrast ratio of 7:1.
Richard Paul is offline  
post #104 of 137 Old 02-06-2009, 06:01 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
vtms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 997
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Paul View Post

The Unipixel prediction of the contrast ratio for TMOS (4,500:1) is less than a hundredth of the contrast ratio advertised with current OLED displays (1,000,000:1).

Just because it's advertised doesn't mean it's true. Current LED LCDs also have 1M:1 contrast according to manufacturers except people who've seen both techs report OLED displaying better picture. Why should there be the discrepancy since the advertised contrast is the same? Someone must be lying. Most likely, everyone is lying. Maybe, in reality, that great looking OLED has 4500:1 contrast and Sony just put a "1M:1 contrast" sticker to make the set seem cooler. Meanwhile, the contrast of that "1M:1" LCD might actually be 1500:1. Once a screen looks great, these tv makers might as well put "Trillion:1 contrast" sticker and people would say, "Yeah, that seems about right."

All that counts is whether the tv looks good in person. As promising TMOS looks on paper, the truth about its PQ will be revealed only when Samsung begins showing prototypes at the consumer shows. Considering the fact TMOS is an LED BLU plus a single sheet of polymer glued to it, the development of this technology should not take as long as, say, SED or OLED so it's reasonable to expect Samsung will show prototypes maybe as soon as CES 2010. Then, and only then, we'll know how good/bad 1st generation TMOS PQ looks. I'm hoping 1st generation will look at least as good as current LED LCDs now.

Also, let's not forget DMS which is equally promising. In 5 years, it's entirely possible that PDPs and LCDs will be long forgotten and the race for TV market domination will be between TMOS and DMS. In a dream scenario, Sony now licenses DMS to compete with Samsung's TMOS so in few years consumers will be able to go to Best Buy, spend no more than $1000 on a thin polymer rolled into a tall tube, go home, unroll the tube and hang the 150" transparent 5mm-thick sheet on the living room wall and enjoy OLED-like (by then HDR) picture. :-)
vtms is offline  
post #105 of 137 Old 02-07-2009, 08:48 AM
Advanced Member
 
S. Hiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 994
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
LED LCD relies on a dynamic contrast scheme to achieve its high contrast ratio. OLED and other non-backlit technologies don't. Would expect OLED to be quite superior...

No way to defend a 4500:1 contrast ratio against the likes of OLED, Kuro plasma, even LED LCD. Latest Kuro and LED LCD have independently measured contrast ratios far superior to that...(probably OLED has been independently measured as well, but I'm not up on the reviews on that...)

(Though 4500:1 would be competitive against many of the non-premium displays...)
S. Hiller is offline  
post #106 of 137 Old 02-10-2009, 01:52 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Richard Paul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 6,955
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by vtms View Post

Maybe, in reality, that great looking OLED has 4500:1 contrast and Sony just put a "1M:1 contrast" sticker to make the set seem cooler.

Note that PC Magazine has some of the lowest contrast ratio numbers I have seen since they test the average contrast ratio of a calibrated display and that contrast ratio tests based only on dynamic contrast ratio would give much higher contrast ratio numbers. In the PC Magazine contrast ratio test the Panasonic TH-46PZ85U had a contrast ratio of 1,408:1, the Samsung LN52A750 had a contrast ratio of 3,725:1, the Pioneer KURO PDP-5020FD had a contrast ratio of 8,809:1, and the Sony XEL-1 OLED Digital TV had a contrast ratio of 23,132:1. I have also seen reviews (such as this CNET review) where the reviewer said the Sony XEL-1 had the best black level and contrast ratio they have seen from a display.
Richard Paul is offline  
post #107 of 137 Old 06-11-2009, 06:21 AM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
vtms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 997
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 16
http://techon.nikkeibp.co.jp/english...090611/171599/

Quote:


Pixtronix Inc unveiled a MEMS display developed with its proprietary technology at SID Display Week 2009.

Pixtronix gave a lecture on the display, "PerfectLight," in the symposium (lecture number: 37.4) and exhibited it at the exhibition site. The company has already prototyped a 2.5-inch QVGA (320 x 240 pixels) display that can display full-color video images.

"We have signed a contract with an Asian panel manufacturer," Pixtronix said. "The product will be released probably in 2010."

The MEMS display is composed of an LED backlight, two glass plates, MEMS shutters and a TFT substrate. The MEMS shutter measures about 160 x 160μm and features the maximum switching speed of 100μs. Although it is a transmissive display with a backlight, unlike LCDs, it does not use color filters or polarizing filters.

Digitally expressed gradation

The PerfectLight reproduces colors by blinking RGB LEDs in a time-divided manner while making them operate in conjunction with the MEMS shutters. Although the shutter has only two values, either open or closed, "the display can express gradation by changing the duty ratio and the number of times the shutter is opened and closed," Pixtronix said.

With this method, the PerfectLight can show 16.77 million colors (24 bits) and provide a color gamut of 145% NTSC, according to the company. It has a contrast ratio of 1,000:1 and a viewing angle of 170°.

The MEMS display's advantage over the existing transmissive displays is that it consumes less power. The power consumption of the new display is 1/4 of that of LCDs. In the case of the prototyped 2.5-inch display, it is about 45mW.

"LCDs can only utilize several percent of the light emitted by the backlight," the company said. "But the PerfectLight, which eliminates the use of color filters, etc, can use up to 60%."

Initially, the display will be targeted at car navigation systems, etc. Pixtronix plans to increase the number of pixels to 800 x 480 (WVGA) so that its applications can be expanded to smartphones, netbooks, notebook PCs and eventually to TVs.

vtms is offline  
post #108 of 137 Old 06-11-2009, 09:21 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Richard Paul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 6,955
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 29

What is the cd/m2 of this proposed 2.5" MEMS display?
Richard Paul is offline  
post #109 of 137 Old 06-12-2009, 04:30 AM
Senior Member
 
guidryp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by vtms View Post

Just because it's advertised doesn't mean it's true. Current LED LCDs also have 1M:1 contrast according to manufacturers except people who've seen both techs report OLED displaying better picture. Why should there be the discrepancy since the advertised contrast is the same? Someone must be lying. Most likely, everyone is lying. Maybe, in reality, that great looking OLED has 4500:1 contrast and Sony just put a "1M:1 contrast" sticker to make the set seem cooler. Meanwhile, the contrast of that "1M:1" LCD might actually be 1500:1.

Are you still on this track even after this has been clearly explained many times?

LCDs are using dynamic contrast to make these ridiculous claims. The panel contrast ratios is generally up to 1500:1. But they turn down the backlight and measure black, turn it up and measure white. That is a scam.

OLED on the other hand, can have full off black while full on white is on the screen at the same time. Essentially contrast on an OLED is Infinite and its measurement will be limited by test equipment and environment. This pure black floor to create images is what will put OLED in the forefront and make them usable to watch movies in pitch dark with still perfect blacks. OTOH TMOS will have compromised blacks/contrast like LCD.

Digital versus test a ridiculous amount of computer monitors/tvs. They record the Sony OLED contrast as INFINITE.
http://www.digitalversus.com/duels.p...&p2=3247&ph=13
guidryp is offline  
post #110 of 137 Old 06-12-2009, 07:15 AM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
vtms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 997
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidryp View Post

Digital versus test a ridiculous amount of computer monitors/tvs. They record the Sony OLED contrast as INFINITE.

Great, can you post this in OLED threads?
vtms is offline  
post #111 of 137 Old 06-16-2009, 05:29 AM
Member
 
Daviii's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 139
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by vtms View Post

Great, can you post this in OLED threads?

Why? Thats a reply of your reply about OLED contrast ratios. And actually if zero light is displayed by one pixel, the panel contrast ratio is indeed infinite. That's a FACT and indeed is something it must be taken into account.
Daviii is offline  
post #112 of 137 Old 10-19-2009, 04:57 PM
Advanced Member
 
Isochroma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 624
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
MEMS film could enable brighter, cheaper displays
16 October 2009

PORTLAND, Ore. A possible successor to the CRT, LCD and even the organic LED is scheduled to hit the market next year, according to a MEMS film developer.

Uni-Pixel, Inc. (Woodlands, Texas) recently announced volume deliveries of its MEMS films. Dubbed "Opcuity," the films are used in time-multiplexed optical shutter (TMOS) displays that are 10 times brighter and 60 percent cheaper to manufacture than LCDs. The films also can be fabricated on the same manufacturing lines as LCDs.

Earlier this year, Samsung Electronics revealed that it had a joint development agreement with Uni-Pixel for its TMOS display technology.

"One of the beauties of our manufacturing process is that it subtracts from existing LCD lines--you just need to remove some equipment that is no longer needed," said Uni-Pixel's CFO James Tassone. "Since we use no red, green and blue sub-pixels, our process is less demanding, requiring only one-third as many thin-film transistors.

"In fact, we can use LCD manufacturing lines that are aging and due to be retired; instead of scraping an aging LCD line, you can retrofit it to make our advanced TMOS displays," Tassone claimed.

TMOS displays use only a single layer of MEMS film between the bottom ("mother") glass and the top glass sheet in an existing LCD structure. By contrast, LCDs have five different layers between the bottom and top glass, including polarizers and color filters that reduce light emissions. As a consequence, the single layer used with TMOS produces displays that are much brighter than LCDs produced on the same line.

Instead of using sub-pixels for red, blue and green, each pixel in Uni-Pixel's MEMS film is uniform, deriving its color by time-mutiplexing the red, green and blue light from side-mounted LEDs that inject light into the bottom glass layer. The scheme acts as a light guide.

Instead of a white backlight to illuminate RGB subpixels, Uni-Pixel's approach routes light from side-mounted LEDs onto the same pixel, with the Opcuity film acting as an optical shutter.

Applying a voltage to a TFT causes the Opcuity film to deform downward, coming into contact with the bottom glass, routing light from LEDs up to a particular pixel. By time-multiplexing in synchronization with the blinking red, blue and green side-mounted LEDs, any color can be mixed at any pixel location, Uni-Pixel claims.

The films, which are microfabricated on inexpensive roll-to-roll manufacturing lines, use MEMS-patterned structures to deflect light from guides to pixels with sub-10 micron micromirrors that are said to react 1,000-times faster than liquid crystals (TMOS displays update pixels in microseconds compared to milliseconds for LCDs).

Uni-Pixel and Samsung are perfecting the TMOS process for 4-inch displays. Since TMOS displays are transparent from the backside, they are also suited for larger displays. By sandwiching Opcuity films between window panes side-lit with LEDs, large displays will be possible on store windows that are only visible from the outside, the company said.
Isochroma is offline  
post #113 of 137 Old 10-19-2009, 08:43 PM
Senior Member
 
DaveC19's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 413
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
All of that side lighting and light guiding just sounds like allot of opportunity for light scattering, leaking and refraction that will cause poor black levels and light bleed.

We already have cheap displays in LCD and they are plenty bright. Ever see an LCD in "torch mode" how bright do you need it?

I still see OLED having a vastly superior black level and contrast level to this. I would hope that this other LCD-esque tech doesn't become the standard and kill everything else just due to the cheap cost. We need at least one high quality display format.
DaveC19 is offline  
post #114 of 137 Old 10-20-2009, 05:19 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
vtms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 997
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 16
http://www.engadget.com/2009/10/19/s...tmos-displays/
Quote:


Uni-Pixel has developed a new display technology that could succeed LCD and LED displays, and if all goes according to plan we might see something come to market as soon as next year. Opcuity uses one layer of MEMS film in in a TMOS (multiplexed optical shutter) device for results that are said to be ten times brighter and sixty percent cheaper to manufacture than LCDs (which use five layers). Since TMOS displays are very similar to LCDs, existing manufacturing lines can be used -- lowering start-up costs and rescuing older assembly lines in the process. According to the company's CFO, the manufacturing process "subtracts from existing LCD lines--you just need to remove some equipment that is no longer needed." Samsung and Uni-Pixel have teamed up to produce 4-inch displays using the technology, but who knows? Maybe Microsoft Research's interactive office will become a reality sooner than you think.

http://www.eetindia.co.in/ART_880058...T_1235ea17.HTM
Quote:


Uni-Pixel Inc. claims that a possible successor to the CRT, LCD and even the organic LED is scheduled to hit the market next year.

The company recently announced volume deliveries of its MEMS films dubbed "Opcuity" that are used in time-multiplexed optical shutter (TMOS) displays and are 10x brighter and 60 per cent cheaper to manufacture than LCDs. The films also can be fabricated on the same manufacturing lines as LCDs.

Earlier this year, Samsung Electronics revealed that it had a joint development agreement with Uni-Pixel for its TMOS display technology.

"One of the beauties of our manufacturing process is that it subtracts from existing LCD lines—you just need to remove some equipment that is no longer needed," said Uni-Pixel's CFO James Tassone. "Since we use no red, green and blue sub-pixels, our process is less demanding, requiring only one-third as many thin-film transistors.

"In fact, we can use LCD manufacturing lines that are ageing and due to be retired; instead of scraping an ageing LCD line, you can retrofit it to make our advanced TMOS displays," Tassone claimed.

TMOS displays use only a single layer of MEMS film between the bottom ("mother") glass and the top glass sheet in an existing LCD structure. By contrast, LCDs have five different layers between the bottom and top glass, including polarisers and colour filters that reduce light emissions. As a consequence, the single layer used with TMOS produces displays that are much brighter than LCDs produced on the same line.

Instead of using sub-pixels for red, blue and green, each pixel in Uni-Pixel's MEMS film is uniform, deriving its colour by time-mutiplexing the red, green and blue light from side-mounted LEDs that inject light into the bottom glass layer. The scheme acts as a light guide.

Instead of a white backlight to illuminate RGB subpixels, Uni-Pixel's approach routes light from side-mounted LEDs onto the same pixel, with the Opcuity film acting as an optical shutter.

Applying a voltage to a TFT causes the Opcuity film to deform downward, coming into contact with the bottom glass, routing light from LEDs up to a particular pixel. By time-multiplexing in synchronisation with the blinking red, blue and green side-mounted LEDs, any colour can be mixed at any pixel location, Uni-Pixel claims.

The films, which are microfabricated on inexpensive roll-to-roll manufacturing lines, use MEMS-patterned structures to deflect light from guides to pixels with sub-10 micron micromirrors that are said to react 1,000x faster than liquid crystals (TMOS displays update pixels in microseconds compared to milliseconds for LCDs).

Uni-Pixel and Samsung are perfecting the TMOS process for 4-inch displays. Since TMOS displays are transparent from the backside, they are also suited for larger displays. By sandwiching Opcuity films between window panes side-lit with LEDs, large displays will be possible on store windows that are only visible from the outside, the company said.

- R. Colin Johnson
EE Times

vtms is offline  
post #115 of 137 Old 10-20-2009, 06:57 PM
AVS Special Member
 
navychop's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 2,211
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 13
This thread done riz from the dead.


While I'd like to see a competitor to OLED, to help constrain prices, I just don't see this one as a winner.

First, it seems to have a very short window before OLED blooms. Next year? In real world terms, as in a 27" or larger (I really think 40" is the new minimum for commercial success) really going to arrive next year? As in 2010? Anybody believe that?

And side lighting - well, that works reasonably well for some LCD displays. Scale that up, and compound it by making it three colors vice one - sorry, the odds of success in that scheme against OLED just seem remote.

These guys are going to try, especially as they are earning a paycheck while they do so. But it's just one more dead end, IMHO. Sure, it might make it to market, maybe. But it won't compete for long, in the HDTV market.

Maybe it can compete in the small screen market. Notebooks down to cell phones? PDAs, iPhones?

Reunite Pangea!
navychop is offline  
post #116 of 137 Old 10-20-2009, 08:08 PM
Senior Member
 
DaveC19's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 413
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by navychop View Post

This thread done riz from the dead.


While I'd like to see a competitor to OLED, to help constrain prices, I just don't see this one as a winner.

First, it seems to have a very short window before OLED blooms. Next year? In real world terms, as in a 27" or larger (I really think 40" is the new minimum for commercial success) really going to arrive next year? As in 2010? Anybody believe that?

And side lighting - well, that works reasonably well for some LCD displays. Scale that up, and compound it by making it three colors vice one - sorry, the odds of success in that scheme against OLED just seem remote.

These guys are going to try, especially as they are earning a paycheck while they do so. But it's just one more dead end, IMHO. Sure, it might make it to market, maybe. But it won't compete for long, in the HDTV market.

Maybe it can compete in the small screen market. Notebooks down to cell phones? PDAs, iPhones?

Yeah that is the first red flag I saw as soon as they started talking light guides and edge lighting. What happens as light travels through a large glass screen such as a 52" and more? I would think it would fall off greatly, plus it would scatter allot. This would tend to make the lighting very un-even I would think. Also the colors would tend to fan out as they get farther from the light sources.

This seems like it would be ok for a 3" phone screen but not larger scale TVs. Of course OLEd or LCD is pretty good for phones and small devices now anyway. I still see OLED as a "cleaner" technology as far as simplicity and performance. This thing seems a bit Rube Goldberg-y to me (as did DLP).

Also aren't OLEDs still simpler to make? No vibrating shutters to worry about, just coat a glass base with emitter materials and TFTs?
DaveC19 is offline  
post #117 of 137 Old 10-21-2009, 08:01 AM
AVS Special Member
 
MikeBiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Longmont, CO
Posts: 1,022
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:


Uni-Pixel and Samsung are perfecting the TMOS process for 4-inch displays.

It seems that it will be a while until the technology (assuming it works as advocated) gets to a size suitable for TV displays.
MikeBiker is offline  
post #118 of 137 Old 10-21-2009, 06:42 PM
AVS Special Member
 
navychop's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 2,211
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveC19 View Post

Yeah that is the first red flag I saw as soon as they started talking light guides and edge lighting. What happens as light travels through a large glass screen such as a 52" and more? I would think it would fall off greatly, plus it would scatter allot. This would tend to make the lighting very un-even I would think. Also the colors would tend to fan out as they get farther from the light sources.

This seems like it would be ok for a 3" phone screen but not larger scale TVs. Of course OLEd or LCD is pretty good for phones and small devices now anyway. I still see OLED as a "cleaner" technology as far as simplicity and performance. This thing seems a bit Rube Goldberg-y to me (as did DLP).

Also aren't OLEDs still simpler to make? No vibrating shutters to worry about, just coat a glass base with emitter materials and TFTs?

Yeah, we've got the same doubts. I also thought DLP seemed a bit outlandish- and then it worked! Seems they have very few problems with micro mirror failures, faults crop up elsewhere. Can't help but think we haven't heard the last from DLP, there must be another use for it down the road.

OLED is in mass ( or massive) production, with few if any scientific breakthrus needed. Just technological development, as they scale things up. It's gonna be a winner. Maybe THE winner.

Reunite Pangea!
navychop is offline  
post #119 of 137 Old 10-21-2009, 07:00 PM
Advanced Member
 
Isochroma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 624
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Light falloff can be retrocompensated by altering the PWM schedule of pixels depending on their distance from edge lighting, but the base PWM frequency must be increased to provide additional brightness steps in order to avoid losing actual signal levels. Falloff rate must be carefully measured and compensated depending on display size and optical geometry, thus necessitating the close pairing of the MEMs shutter array with the light delivery system.

Scattering can be prevented using coherent optical waveguides - a kind of backplane fiber-optic without the fiber.

Having said these things, let me contradict myself: neither is a guarantee of technical quality in a large MEMs display; instead they are simply strategies to mitigate the potential shortcomings of edge lighting.
Isochroma is offline  
post #120 of 137 Old 10-22-2009, 04:28 PM
AVS Special Member
 
navychop's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 2,211
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 13
No doubt adding more expense, also.

Reunite Pangea!
navychop is offline  
Reply Flat Panels General and OLED Technology

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off