Which produces more heat, CRT or plasma TV's? - AVS Forum
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OLED Technology and Flat Panels General > Which produces more heat, CRT or plasma TV's?
Clint S.'s Avatar Clint S. 05:56 AM 07-02-2008
Can anyone tell me please which produces more heat, CRT or plasma TV's?
Thank you.

RandyWalters's Avatar RandyWalters 07:11 AM 07-02-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clint S. View Post

Can anyone tell me please which produces more heat, CRT or plasma TV's?

It can vary between types and brands and formats. I have an infrared temperature gun and i have compared the heat output of my various TVs from time to time. My old Panasonic CT-32HXC43 HD Tube TV actually put out more heat than my TH-42PX50U Plasma that replaced it. I also have a 26" HP LCD TV and it puts out more heat than my old 42PX50U does. And to top everything off, my newer TH-42PZ700U puts out a little less heat than my 42PX50U. I don't remember the older TVs numbers but when i checked a few weeks ago my 26" LCD was outputting about 104F while the 42" PZ700U 4 feet to the left was outputting 97F. Ever time i check these two TVs the LCD is always putting out more heat, despite the screen size being so much smaller. However the same screen sizes in other brands might come up with completely different numbers and results.

The bottom line is that all TVs put out a certain amount of heat but the difference should not be a factor in which brand or type of TV one chooses. Whatever you buy, it's going to put out heat just like your old tube TVs do.
8IronBob's Avatar 8IronBob 07:33 AM 07-02-2008
True, even some LCD flat panels can produce heat, depending on the processing technology that so brand uses. I know that there are certain brands that do tend to overheat, and there are some companies that do have moving parts inside some LCDs to keep them cool, especially in smaller sized ones. It all really depends.
Clint S.'s Avatar Clint S. 07:38 AM 07-02-2008
Thanks for replying and the info Randy.

Oh my, now I'm more confused than ever! I've been reading about this and everything I saw said that plasma TV's gave off more heat than LCD.

The reason I need to know is here in the summer the AC is marginal at best, and there's no way I can put up with a TV that puts off more heat than my current 27" CRT. Since I have to get a new TV (HDTV), I can't get the type that may give off more heat. I'm looking at 37" - 46" at the largest, probably 40-42" if that matters.

So maybe I can rephrase this: can you or anyone tell me if a 40-42" LCD or plasma TV gives off more heat than a 27" CRT? If they do not, then my options would be open to LCD or plasma. Brands I'm looking at are probably Sony XBRx series for LCD, (I guess Samsung is not in my options now due to their analog 2nd source PiP). I haven't look at many plasma sets yet because I thought they gave off more heat.
30XS955 User's Avatar 30XS955 User 07:44 AM 07-02-2008
My 46inch Sony LCD puts off way more heat than my 30inch Sony CRT.
Clint S.'s Avatar Clint S. 07:45 AM 07-02-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8IronBob View Post

True, even some LCD flat panels can produce heat, depending on the processing technology that so brand uses. I know that there are certain brands that do tend to overheat, and there are some companies that do have moving parts inside some LCDs to keep them cool, especially in smaller sized ones. It all really depends.

So would know how Sony LCD ranks for heat? Or which plasma sets are hot, or cooler?

Smaller sizes need more options to keep them cool than larger ones?? That doesn't make sense, unless the LCD panel itself acts as some kind of a "heat sink", therefore smaller sizes need more cooling.
Thanks.
Clint S.'s Avatar Clint S. 07:47 AM 07-02-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by 30XS955 User View Post

My 46inch Sony LCD puts off way more heat than my 30inch Sony CRT.

OMG. Guess I'm screwed. Sounds like I may have to cut a hole in the ceiling above a set for heat exhaust.
PENDRAG0ON's Avatar PENDRAG0ON 08:28 AM 07-02-2008
My 42 inch Panasonic runs much cooler than any TV I have ever owned, including a 19 inch CRT, 20 inch CRT, 28 inch HD CRT, 15 inch LCD, 26 inch LCD, 42 inch Samsung plasma. All of those TVs ran hotter than my Panasonic plasma which is quite surprising when you think about it. (I still own the 20 inch CRT, the 28 inch HD CRT, and the Panasonic plasma) I couldn't even put my hand on the back of some of them without burning myself (the Samsung plasma was one of them) but this Panasonic barely gets warm even after being on all day.
Clint S.'s Avatar Clint S. 08:38 AM 07-02-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by PENDRAG0ON View Post

My 42 inch Panasonic runs much cooler than any TV I have ever owned,

And that's a plasma TV, but the Samsung plasma was much hotter?

If so, I can see my original question is pointless, LOL.

Apparently all I can do is get a HDTV on features and pray it runs cooler than my current CRT, and if it doesn't do to the ceiling exhaust bit.
HoustonPerson's Avatar HoustonPerson 09:21 AM 07-02-2008
Clint, What Randy and others have said it 100% true.

My current 42" 800U is a lot cooler than then 15 year old 32" trinitron we have. They are all different from brand to brand, year to year, model to model, and size to size.

I have seen some plasmas from a couple of years ago that would burn your hand (turn it bright red in about 30 seconds) at the top center back of the cabinet, while other models were very cool to the touch. I have seen many LCD's a lot hotter than Plasmas, and of course the opposite is also true. During the last 12 months I have not found any that "burn" your hand.

Even the current generation DLPs are a lot different. The 2008 Samsung 50" A650 is a lot warmer (10-20 degrees I would guess?), than the 2008 61" A750. That is a super quick seat of the pants test (like 5 seconds), comparison in the store. Of course each of those two models have completely different light engines.

As a quick test in the stores, just go in a feel the top back center of the cabinets on the different models you are interested in, and that will partially answer some of the heat questions.

Side note: We did have a Samsung LCD 32"A550 that would heat up fast and hot. The current 800U plasma does not begin to get warm till after it has been on for 1-2 hours, even after being on for 6 hours, it was still cooler to the touch then the A550 was in the first 30 min. I would guess about 20 degrees cooler.
Clint S.'s Avatar Clint S. 12:30 PM 07-02-2008
Guys, thanks to you all for the replies, I appreciate it.
undermined's Avatar undermined 04:42 AM 07-05-2008
It is kinda a subjective thing because if you had a 32" CRT versus a 32" flat-planel odd are the flat-panel would put out much less heat but a 46"-65" flat panel will still put off a good amount of heat, even worst if it is flat up against a wall without room for airflow.
PENDRAG0ON's Avatar PENDRAG0ON 08:52 AM 07-05-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clint S. View Post

And that's a plasma TV, but the Samsung plasma was much hotter?

If so, I can see my original question is pointless, LOL.

Apparently all I can do is get a HDTV on features and pray it runs cooler than my current CRT, and if it doesn't do to the ceiling exhaust bit.

There were times that I thought that my Wii sensor bar cable was going to melt with my Samsung. (it would literally burn my hand to touch where the cable was, and on the same spot on my Panasonic it is barely warm.) My Panasonic settings are also brighter than my Samsung settings were.

(Panasonic is a 42px75, Samsung was a 4254)
Clint S.'s Avatar Clint S. 08:24 PM 07-05-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramazur View Post

The OP asked about the amount of heat meaning the average power drawn over a period of time.

I kind of refined it after my original post: So maybe I can rephrase this: can you or anyone tell me if a 40-42" LCD or plasma TV gives off more heat than a 27" CRT?

Quote:


1kWh is an energy a device that draws 1000 watts consumes in one hour. Temperature increase is a result of power consumption. It cannot be used to compare unless the objects being compared are identical (size, shape, color, etc.) in their ability to transfer internal heat to the environment - the room. A small 100W TV may actually get hotter (to touch) than a 200W, 52-inch LCD. Consequently, measuring temperature may lead to false outcomes. The only sure way to answer his question is to measure the real power using a watt meter. The second best an amp-meter.

So are you saying that I can look at the power consumption of the TV's, and if one requires ~280 watts and another ~230 watts, the one that requires 280 will give off more heat? Sounds like that may depend on the design of the cabinet and other things. If that's the case then I'd have to find out what the power consumption is of my current TV and I have no idea without buying a watt meter. I would guess it's less than 150w.

I'm not concerned with "hot to the touch", although it may seem logical that if one is hotter to the touch it theoretically could give off more heat, but not if that specific area was small compared to a much larger area that gave off less heat.
jasonyetter's Avatar jasonyetter 10:12 AM 11-21-2008
Just like a little heater

My 42" Akai from Sams Club generates enough heat to warm a small room.

Go to Best Buy with a infrared thermometer (<$50) and shoot the screens.
You'll get a good guess as to which ones you can use for cooking.

LCD's in general use 1/3 less power, so you might conclude they should also generate less heat?

That said, I've found it necessary to adjust the heating-cooling in locations that contain extensive electronics. I use the ceiling fan in my home theatre to keep everyone comfortable. The heat load from the equipment and greater numbers of people can make it uncomfortably warm. J
plmn's Avatar plmn 12:35 PM 11-21-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramazur View Post

A device that draws 280 watts will always produce more heat than the one that draws 230 watts. The design will only affect the temperatures at various spots where you can touch. All of the energy a TV set draws from the wall socket, regardless of the design, will eventually convert to heat and increase the room temperature. Some extremely small amount will be radiated out of the room as RF or light.

Any set with an adjustable brightness will draw according to the brightness setting. Additionally, plasma as opposed to a typical LCD, will draw according to what is on the screen and that means that the power draw will vary, scene-to-scene. LCD's draw is independent of what is playing and depends on how brightness is set by the user. The LCD sets with LED backlighting act more like plasmas in this regard.


Yep, just to make this clear I'll add that a well-ventilated TV with fans is going to feel cool to the touch, but that doesn't mean it isn't putting off large amounts of heat. There is no way you will be able to tell by looking at the store.

I think Crutchfield has some decent actual power consumption numbers. you can't just go by the max power they are rated at. LCD or plasma, there's no getting around the fact that big flat panels put out heat.
Clint S.'s Avatar Clint S. 08:55 PM 11-22-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonyetter View Post

Just like a little heater

My 42" Akai from Sams Club generates enough heat to warm a small room.

Wow, that's rather troubling to hear.


Quote:


Go to Best Buy with a infrared thermometer (<$50) and shoot the screens.
You'll get a good guess as to which ones you can use for cooking.

I have one of those already (a great 12:1 distance-to-spot ratio). The problem is no one locally carries sets I'm considering and from what I've heard here, heat varies greatly by brand and model.


Quote:


LCD's in general use 1/3 less power, so you might conclude they should also generate less heat?

That sounds logical. But the sets I'm looking at were around 280 watts for both LCD and plasma.


Quote:


That said, I've found it necessary to adjust the heating-cooling in locations that contain extensive electronics. I use the ceiling fan in my home theatre to keep everyone comfortable. The heat load from the equipment and greater numbers of people can make it uncomfortably warm. J

I'll probably have to cut a hole in the ceiling above the set and put an exhaust fan in it.
Human Bass's Avatar Human Bass 04:49 AM 11-24-2008
Remember that LCD occupies a much smaller space(volume) than a CRT, so a 200W LCD can be more "heat dense" than a 1000W CRT.
HoustonPerson's Avatar HoustonPerson 06:18 AM 11-24-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clint S. View Post

If so, I can see my original question is pointless, LOL.

.

No not really, the question is not pointless.

Keep in mind each model and size within each brand will put out different amounts of heat, AND each brand (with all the other factors just listed) WILL change from year to year (or even running models changes).

Pick out the few models you are seriously looking at buying and then compare the temps. Even at different stores. TV's sitting out in the open will feel cooler than those sitting under shelves. Placing your hand top dead center on the back of the cabinet can tell you a lot. You can easily tell the difference of a couple degrees, and you can really tell the difference of 10,20,30 degrees. They can vary that much.

You will find the current 2008 Panasonic plasma's to be exceptionally cool - it greater detail the 42PZ800U runs about 20 degrees cooler than the Samsung 32A550 LCD which is very warm (almost hot to the touch).

Some of the 2004-2006 Samsung Plasma models would actually burn your hand they were so hot, their 2008 models are a lot better, but still vary warm.

Also, keep in mind a set that has only be on for 10 or 15 min. is not a real comparison. Try to make the comparison for sets that have been on 4-6 hours. If it is still cool to the touch then, then it should stay that way.

Our house is kept at 70 degrees 24 hours a day - It's Houston and that is to keep the humidity out.

All temps are estimates but with a thermometer - top dead center, and after 5 hours of playing.

42"800U - 78-80 degrees

Sony HD DVR - 82-85 degrees(inside of box stays about 112 it has two temp gauges inside)

Denon 1909 AVR - 102 degrees (considered by most to be the coolest AVRs on the market) - it puts out a lot more heat than the plasma but far less than the Samsung 32"LCD
Clint S.'s Avatar Clint S. 06:50 AM 11-24-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by HoustonPerson View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clint S.
If so, I can see my original question is pointless, LOL.

No not really, the question is not pointless.

Well it is rather pointless or invalid because you just said so yourself about how much they vary from brand to brand and model to model. So the question has no real answer. But I do thank you for all the other info. I've narrowed down my choices to an Olevia 742i (due to true dual-tuner digital PiP) or Samsung 40" 650 or 750 series, maybe 850 (none of which anyone carries locally). If plasma, probably Panasonic, the one CR magazine always put at the top.
M-Desantos's Avatar M-Desantos 10:45 AM 11-24-2008
My 30" HDTV CRT puts out more radiant heat than my 42" Panasonic Plasma.
HoustonPerson's Avatar HoustonPerson 03:32 PM 11-24-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clint S. View Post

Well it is rather pointless or invalid because you just said so yourself about how much they vary from brand to brand and model to model. So the question has no real answer. But I do thank you for all the other info. I've narrowed down my choices to an Olevia 742i (due to true dual-tuner digital PiP) or Samsung 40" 650 or 750 series, maybe 850 (none of which anyone carries locally). If plasma, probably Panasonic, the one CR magazine always put at the top.

Well to clarify, heat does kill. LOL At least electronic components. It does shorten the life as a general rule. Cooler running equipment typically will last longer.

Having been in the business for 30 years, the hotter the set the shorter the life span. That is a general statement, it is not true in every case. Just like the man that drowned wading across a stream which averaged 3 feet deep.
oldcband's Avatar oldcband 08:11 AM 06-03-2009
Old thread but a link of intrest. For me anyway.

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008...a_tvs_suck.php
HarrisonS's Avatar HarrisonS 08:28 AM 06-03-2009
The amount of heat generated by most displays is a non-issue, unless you are trying to be "green" and spare energy, and then you can probably save energy in other areas. In my experience, I find that my 60" KURO runs surprisingly cool, and does not heat the room very noticeably, even after it has been in use for several hours, and it only gets mildly warm to the touch.
tluxon's Avatar tluxon 05:39 PM 06-03-2009
Using the conservation of energy theory, the best measurement of how much "heat" a set produces is the quantity of electricity that goes into it. Taking measurements from various locations around the set can be very misleading because it's going to be dependent on variables such as heat capacity, heatsink volume and area, and the rate of thermal emissivity, among others. The great equalizer is measuring how much energy goes into it.
Bushman4's Avatar Bushman4 10:02 PM 06-04-2009
Both are heat producers. No real preferable winner based on equal size. Best solution is propper venting, & placement, with size the of room and height of ceiling being a consideration
oldcband's Avatar oldcband 12:59 PM 06-07-2009
With the growing demand for a greener world here is a method. Heat dissapation is important for the growing world of electronics.

http://www.azonano.com/news.asp?newsID=10877
Artwood's Avatar Artwood 05:14 PM 06-07-2009
Do the greener world worshipers favor elimination of TV and people changing to viewmaster slides?
cylonsix's Avatar cylonsix 12:29 AM 06-08-2009
Anyone think a 58" plasma (panasonic v10) would get a room 12x12 too hot?? Right now I have a 50" Sony sxrd that puts out 92 degrees of heat in 2 spots (operation watts is 220 watts) in the back of the tv and for the most part but for the hottest days of the year the temp in the room is fine ( I leave the window open in the room). My HD-DVR is the 'beast' in the room at output of 132-145 degrees (180watts) with good ventlation. The plasma would be about 1.5 feet from the wall and calibrated for a dark room (the contrast will NOT be cranked high and guessing, since it is not out yet, at around 325watts as average operation watts, the 54" v10 is 298 watts).
Clint S.'s Avatar Clint S. 01:18 AM 06-08-2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by cylonsix View Post

Anyone think a 58" plasma (panasonic v10) would get a room 12x12 too hot?? Right now I have a 50" Sony sxrd that puts out 92 degrees of heat in 2 spots (operation watts is 220 watts) in the back of the tv and for the most part but for the hottest days of the year the temp in the room is fine ( I leave the window open in the room). My HD-DVR is the 'beast' in the room at output of 132-145 degrees (180watts) with good ventlation. The plasma would be about 1.5 feet from the wall and calibrated for a dark room (the contrast will NOT be cranked high and guessing, since it is not out yet, at around 325watts as average operation watts, the 54" v10 is 298 watts).

See these two posts for some detailed info for a Kuro 5020's temperatures.
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...6#post15947616
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...2#post15947652
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...1#post15966651
The 5020's watt rating is 436 watts.
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