Is there a large screen LED/LCD TV/Display with the same performance of a "PC Monitor" LED/LCD? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 24 Old 10-12-2013, 12:17 PM - Thread Starter
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I'm talking mainly response times, input lag, and general clarity but viewing angles and black levels are important too. On my desktop I have a 27" Samsung 350 Series S27A350H and I love it much more for games than my LG Plasma (60PV450) because it's clearer and sharper than my Plasma but mainly the response time/input lag for games and also for web browsing I'm so sick of ABL on plasma because it makes text on bright backgrounds blend in too much/fuzzy and hard to read (not only on my current model plasma, but all I've ever owned). For movie viewing only, I still love plasma, but I want to do more gaming and web browsing on the big screen and the plasma just doesn't cut it for me in this regard. So my question is can you get a large screen LED/LCD around 60" to perform the same as a smaller PC monitor or are all large screens just laggier in comparison to PC marketed displays?
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post #2 of 24 Old 10-12-2013, 03:44 PM
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Sony's W8 LCDs are probably the closest thing: 4:4:4/RGB in PC mode, MotionFlow Impulse for CRT-like motion quality (similar to LightBoost, but 60Hz) and 20ms latency - about the lowest you'll find on a TV.
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post #3 of 24 Old 10-12-2013, 03:55 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks, I'll check 'em out...
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post #4 of 24 Old 10-12-2013, 06:04 PM
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I wouldn't count on the Impulse mode. You'll be running away from ABL only to see mediocre 98 cd/m2 brightness, extra flickers, and higher input lag.

http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/news/sony-kdl55w905a-201305172987.htm?page=Performance

"The Sony W905′s “Impulse” mode implementation caused significantly less flicker to our eyes compared to last year’s HX853, which is a massive plus. However, there’s still a sizeable amount of brightness drop: with “Impulse” mode engaged, we only managed to coax a maximum luminance of 98 cd/m2 out of the KDL-55W905A with both [Backlight] and [Contrast] bumped up to “Max“. This pretty much rules it out for daytime viewing when it’s arguably most needed, since most live sports broadcasts (which benefit most from higher motion resolution without interpolation artefacts) take place during the day."

"Of course, being an LCD-based HDTV, the Sony W9 is not free from motion blur inherent to LCD display technology, but we think that low input lag is by far the most important attribute that contributes to an enjoyable gaming experience (alongside useful squad members). If you seek better motion clarity, you can opt to engage the only [Motionflow] setting available in [Game Mode], namely “Impulse“. On our review sample, this raised the Leo Bodnar lag tester result to 30ms, which is still superb by all accounts. That said, [Motionflow] “Impulse” in [Game Mode] appeared to exhibit more flicker than in [Cinema 1] mode, and there’s always the drastic drop in brightness – we didn’t think it was worth the tradeoff."

If you have to have 4:4:4, then Sony W900 will have the best compromise, but I would rather have Panasonic S60 and call it a day. (Of course, I hate ABLs like you, so I'm waiting for next year's Samsung plasma with lower input lag. Samsung F8500 basically gives you everything you want...except for the input lag)
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post #5 of 24 Old 10-12-2013, 06:41 PM
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Originally Posted by KOF View Post

I wouldn't count on the Impulse mode. You'll be running away from ABL only to see mediocre 98 cd/m2 brightness, extra flickers, and higher input lag.
Reference brightness is 100cd/m2. An ABL dims the image based on the image content, it's a very different thing, and makes a display completely unsuitable for computer use.
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post #6 of 24 Old 10-13-2013, 05:22 PM
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Originally Posted by KOF View Post

I wouldn't count on the Impulse mode. You'll be running away from ABL only to see mediocre 98 cd/m2 brightness, extra flickers, and higher input lag.
Reference brightness is 100cd/m2. An ABL dims the image based on the image content, it's a very different thing, and makes a display completely unsuitable for computer use.

 

Actually, I'm glad you brought this up just now: I was just going to ask about this.  No one likes dealing with ABL, but is it that undoable for PC usage?


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post #7 of 24 Old 10-13-2013, 06:58 PM
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Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post

Actually, I'm glad you brought this up just now: I was just going to ask about this.  No one likes dealing with ABL, but is it that undoable for PC usage?
I don't know of any Plasma which lets you reduce or disable the ABL. When you enable power saving modes, it usually gets more aggressive though.

There was a report on the Sony OLED monitors which showed that reducing contrast to ~70% would eliminate the ABL, which means they behave more like a CRT did, where ABL strength was related to light output.
This was not the case with any Plasmas I have used or measured - which is why I find the ABL so intrusive on them.
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post #8 of 24 Old 10-14-2013, 08:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post
 
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Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post

Actually, I'm glad you brought this up just now: I was just going to ask about this.  No one likes dealing with ABL, but is it that undoable for PC usage?
I don't know of any Plasma which lets you reduce or disable the ABL. When you enable power saving modes, it usually gets more aggressive though.

There was a report on the Sony OLED monitors which showed that reducing contrast to ~70% would eliminate the ABL, which means they behave more like a CRT did, where ABL strength was related to light output.
This was not the case with any Plasmas I have used or measured - which is why I find the ABL so intrusive on them.

 

Ok, but looking at my PC monitor right now, it's a static amount of light for most of large periods of time.  That's not undoable for a PC.  I'm just guessing.


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post #9 of 24 Old 10-14-2013, 08:56 PM
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Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post

Ok, but looking at my PC monitor right now, it's a static amount of light for most of large periods of time.  That's not undoable for a PC.  I'm just guessing.
Sorry, I'm not sure what you mean. I thought you were talking about the plasma, not the PC.
With a PC, as you work with multiple windows, move/resize them, view dark/light web pages, the ABL goes nuts on most plasmas.
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post #10 of 24 Old 10-16-2013, 04:08 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

Sorry, I'm not sure what you mean. I thought you were talking about the plasma, not the PC.
With a PC, as you work with multiple windows, move/resize them, view dark/light web pages, the ABL goes nuts on most plasmas.

Ya, general PC usages sucks on Plasmas. So what's the main underlying reason why it's so hard for larger screens to perform as good as smaller PC monitors on average and also why do they need so much laggy image processing to look good?
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post #11 of 24 Old 10-16-2013, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by KOF View Post

mediocre 98 cd/m2 brightness
Many plasmas are worse than this especially during bright pictures.
While with the Sony, there's no brightness degradation during bright pictures.
Plus, many people play video games in a dark room too, so 98cd/m2 is a bit too bright sometimes. I like my desktop monitors at about 50cd/m2 sometimes at nighttime.
Also, Impulse also becomes a bit brighter if you turn off the ambient light sensor.
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extra flickers
And plasma doesn't flicker???
Also it's confirmed it is no worse than plasma at the same actual benchmarked motion resolution (MPRT measurement method). When excluding source-based motion blur (e.g. camera blur, etc), the motion blur mathematics of a display scientifically shows this: 1ms of display persistence equals 1 pixel of perceived display motion blur during 1000 pixels/sec motion. Therefore, at a fixed refresh rate such as 60Hz, when disabling interpolation, the flicker is closely tied to motion resolution. Less flicker at 60Hz, less motion resolution. Scientifically tested, too (list of links). You cannot eliminate motion blur at 60Hz in an interpolation-free manner without using light modulation (aka flicker, phosphor decay, etc). It's scientifically impossible. Interpolation is not an option for fast-twitch video games, due to input lag. You can reduce flicker while eliminating motion blur, by using a higher refresh rate, but that's not an option for console gaming.

So please ignore the display technology (plasma or LCD), due the scientific tradeoff of flicker-vs-motion-blur regardless of display technology.
There are details like abruptness and softness of flicker -- such as phosphor decay, which softens flicker but also adds motion blur -- e.g. long persistence CRT's have more more motion blur than short-persistence CRT phosphor).
Future strobe backlight LCD's can simulate softness of decay by using a capacitor decay in the backlight, etc, with an adjustment for decay speed/persistence, so theoretically, it would emulate a plasma more closely (perhaps that's what Sony's newer Motionflow has already done).

In other words HDTVTest is essentially saying "It's not worth using plasma flicker to reduce motion blur in console gaming" when, clearly obviously, many people are willing to tolerate a bit of plasma flicker to get less motion blur during console gaming. If they can get an equivalent amount of (adjustable) flicker to reduce motion blur, then why not?
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and higher input lag.
This is better than plasma.
Many plasmas have 50ms of input lag, so 30ms is excellent.

I've already privately contacted HDTVTest.co.uk with the TestUFO motion tests, and they've agreed with my findings when put in this perspective. I asked them to make sure their future tests will now take into account of the relative gaming quality differences (ignoring the panel technology) They might not test gaming quality, but you never know -- at least they're now aware that the use case is different than for video.

Thanks,
Mark Rejhon

www.BlurBusters.com

BlurBusters Blog -- Eliminating Motion Blur by 90%+ on LCD for games and computers

Rooting for upcoming low-persistence rolling-scan OLEDs too!

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post #12 of 24 Old 10-20-2013, 06:21 PM
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eek.gif Alot of myths surrounding plasma.. none of which plague either of my Panasonic plasma monitors

"input lag"
Plasma monitors have been measured at less than 10ms/60hz while technically being capable of 120hz

"fuzzy text"
Text on my TH-42PF30 is as sharp as you can possibly get without venturing into screen door territory
Subsampling, overscan and oversharpening are all to blame for fuzzy text

"dancing pixels"
Find the picture modes with the highest bit depth, for me that is Cinema and Monitor mode. Those big gradation numbers only apply to certain modes while others use extra long sub-fields plus dithering to achieve greater peak brightness. Also without correcting your input levels to PC levels(0-255) there is going to be unwanted noise or what people call "snow" in dark and light areas, super easy to correct with a test pattern.

"ABL"
Defeated by Monitor mode which is a clone of Cinema mode only with locked down contrast controls

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Originally Posted by Emig5m View Post

Ya, general PC usages sucks on Plasmas. So what's the main underlying reason why it's so hard for larger screens to perform as good as smaller PC monitors on average and also why do they need so much laggy image processing to look good?
Cost cutting, its cheaper to have one processor do everything than a few discrete chips running in parallel like in specialist monitors
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post #13 of 24 Old 10-21-2013, 12:25 AM
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Originally Posted by ChadThunder View Post

"input lag"
Plasma monitors have been measured at less than 10ms/60hz while technically being capable of 120hz
Some of the older Plasmas were measured at "16ms" when compared to a CRT reference but those numbers will be higher using the Leo Bodnar lag tester. Current plasmas are at least double that. I don't know of any plasma which accepts a 120Hz signal, or is capable of displaying 120Hz. I don't know any which measured "10ms"
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"fuzzy text"
Text on my TH-42PF30 is as sharp as you can possibly get without venturing into screen door territory
Subsampling, overscan and oversharpening are all to blame for fuzzy text
Even when displaying 4:4:4/RGB plasmas put out a soft image.
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"dancing pixels"
Find the picture modes with the highest bit depth, for me that is Cinema and Monitor mode. Those big gradation numbers only apply to certain modes while others use extra long sub-fields plus dithering to achieve greater peak brightness. Also without correcting your input levels to PC levels(0-255) there is going to be unwanted noise or what people call "snow" in dark and light areas, super easy to correct with a test pattern.
Plasmas are incapable of producing noise-free images due to how they draw an image. This is patently false.
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"ABL"
Defeated by Monitor mode which is a clone of Cinema mode only with locked down contrast controls
Not on any Plasma I know of.

Plasmas are totally unsuitable for use as computer monitors.
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post #14 of 24 Old 10-22-2013, 03:57 AM
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edit:double post
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post #15 of 24 Old 10-22-2013, 04:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

Some of the older Plasmas were measured at "16ms" when compared to a CRT reference but those numbers will be higher using the Leo Bodnar lag tester. Current plasmas are at least double that. I don't know of any plasma which accepts a 120Hz signal, or is capable of displaying 120Hz. I don't know any which measured "10ms"
Panasonic PF20, PF30, PF50 professional plasmas have almost no lag and unofficially support 120Hz
"I didn’t measure any lag time over 10ms with three runs of the measurement", Phil Hinton on the PF20
The included DVI input is faster than HDMI and running at 120hz will knock off another 4 milliseconds guaranteed


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Even when displaying 4:4:4/RGB plasmas put out a soft image.

Why do you believe that? Plasma are fixed pixel displays with hard edged sub-pixels
My Panasonic TH-42PF30 puts out a razor sharp image and I am not only one who thinks so

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"Where the PF20 does do things well is with presenting a very clean and sharp looking image (with 1:1 pixel mapping) that also has excellent colour gradation control. This is one area where the professional screen does shine and as such the sharpness of image and the shadow detailing make the picture a very compelling one to watch.", Phil Hinton

"It's only Panasonic that have produced a panel that I can put 1 pixel wide lines on and see nothing but one pixel wide lines (not 1 pixel wide lines with 1 pixel of edge enhancement, or 1 pixel wide with a buzzing over it from PWM, or 1 pixel wide that is rescaled and blurred)", Liam @ Prog AV

"But when I tried the Panasonic TH-50PF11EK, I finally found the screen I was looking for. Surely not the black level of Kuro, but the picture of Panasonic was less "processed" i.e. it had a more analouge feel to it. This pro-screen is also razersharp compared to Pioneer and Panasonic consumer-screens (G10, V10= both delivered back)", J.Haugen

"There is absolutely NO question that the Panasonic gives a far better, cleaner, more detailed image. Using the scene at the beginning of Ch 15 from Casino Royale we could see FAR more detail in the picture - the pillars of the buildings and tables in the square looked more like a photo than a TV image", Tony Lazzerini

"I have to say that I think the new Panasonic commercial screens really are as good as it gets, there is a depth to the image, which is brought on by just how amazingly clean the image is, that I just don't get with the Pioneer.
When you see them both running side by side the sharpness is the first thing that hits you, even my wife, who absolutely no interest in what display is on the wall, reckons the Pioneer looks 'blurry' in comaprison. 'Blurry' would not be my choice of words but she has a point."
, gizlaroc

"The Panasonic VX100, then in second place the PF11 series is the sharpest cleanest flat panel image I have ever seen", Liam @ Prog AV

"This is without doubt absolutely true. The Pana image has a photographic look it's image is so pin sharp. The Pio just looks soft and noisy in comparison", Tony Lazzerini

"The Panasonic has a more analogue feel, it feels like a big CRT display compared with the Pioneer, not sure why, but it does, the panny also has a very, very clean image, there is no noise at all", gizlaroc
All in reference to the Panasonic commercial models


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Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

Plasmas are incapable of producing noise-free images due to how they draw an image. This is patently false.

I just turned the lights off and opened Microsoft paint to test for noise against a black background, drawing solid squares there was a feint low frequency noise between Lum 2 and Lum 19 inclusive, every other shade is perfectly solid


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Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

Not on any Plasma I know of.

Straight from the manual
"Monitor mode - For use when creating broadcast or movie content. With this picture, even if the overall average picture level (APL) changes, the brightness of areas with the same signal level does not change."
Tested this many times with different sized windows, boxes, everything

Monitor mode (No ABL, high bit depth)
Cinema mode" (ABL, high bit depth)
Normal mode (ABL, low bit depth, higher light output)
Dynamic mode (ABL, low bit depth, highest light output)


Quote:
Plasmas are totally unsuitable for use as computer monitors.

I have owned high end CRTs, Trinitrons, 8-bit LCDs and this plasma gives the cleanest most authentic picture I have ever seen
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post #16 of 24 Old 10-22-2013, 04:22 AM
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Originally Posted by ChadThunder View Post

Panasonic PF20, PF30, PF50 professional plasmas have almost no lag and unofficially support 120Hz
These are old low contrast models that are no longer relevant today.
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Originally Posted by ChadThunder View Post

"I didn’t measure any lag time over 10ms with three runs of the measurement", Phil Hinton on the PF20
1. As I said in my previous post, older models had lower latency than current displays. This is because they had much more basic processing and were far less accurate than the displays we have today.
2. There is no mention of how lag was measured in that review. Considering it is from 2010, it will have been compared to some "reference" display which may or may not have been a CRT. This method has proven to be flawed and you should expect numbers at least twice that when measured with the Leo Bodnar lag tester.
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Why do you believe that? Plasma are fixed pixel displays with hard edged sub-pixels
My Panasonic TH-42PF30 puts out a razor sharp image and I am not only one who thinks so
Most people will agree that plasmas are not as sharp as LCDs when you compare the same size side-by-side.
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...
All in reference to the Panasonic commercial models
The funny thing is that I have quite a bit of experience with many of the models mentioned here. I don't agree.
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I just turned the lights off and opened Microsoft paint to test for noise against a black background, drawing solid squares there was a feint low frequency noise between Lum 2 and Lum 19 inclusive, every other shade is perfectly solid
With the driving method that Panasonic uses, noise/contouring will be more apparent in motion than with static images, unlike Pioneer plasmas where they exhibit a lot of noise in static images, but avoid dynamic false contouring.
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"Monitor mode - For use when creating broadcast or movie content. With this picture, even if the overall average picture level (APL) changes, the brightness of areas with the same signal level does not change."
I don't recall that feature being on the newer monitors but I may be mistaken. I can say that this was definitely not the case with Pioneer's pro panels.
It is not available on any of the consumer displays, and I don't think the pro line has been updated for some time now, so they are using much older panels.
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I have owned high end CRTs, Trinitrons, 8-bit LCDs and this plasma gives the cleanest most authentic picture I have ever seen
I have to question your methods of testing if you think your plasma has better gradation than a CRT or the better LCD panels. There's a reason that medical displays - where gradation is critically important - are all LCD panels rather than plasmas.
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post #17 of 24 Old 10-22-2013, 06:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

These are old low contrast models that are no longer relevant today.

What? PF50 is a current model
Here is my Sony Trinitron tube standing next to my TH-42PF30




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1. As I said in my previous post, older models had lower latency than current displays. This is because they had much more basic processing and were far less accurate than the displays we have today.
2. There is no mention of how lag was measured in that review. Considering it is from 2010, it will have been compared to some "reference" display which may or may not have been a CRT. This method has proven to be flawed and you should expect numbers at least twice that when measured with the Leo Bodnar lag tester.

Take it up with AVF, I believe their numbers because I use a PF30 every day and before I shelved my Trinitron I played some games stretched across both monitors and there was almost nothing between them, certainly less than one frame.
The Bodnar method is highly questionable for plasma, I have read an account where the UT50 was faster by eye but Bodnar gave the victory to a Sony LCD by ~12ms! that is simply a huge error margin.


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The funny thing is that I have quite a bit of experience with many of the models mentioned here. I don't agree.

I must ask did you turn off Nanodrift? nanodrift is on by default and blurs every pixel with adjacent pixels
Did you use DVI? DVI is perfect for computer graphics (defaults to RGB 4:4:4 colorspace)
Did you have sharpness on 0? anything past that introduces ringing and other artifacts


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Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

With the driving method that Panasonic uses, noise/contouring will be more apparent in motion than with static images, unlike Pioneer plasmas where they exhibit a lot of noise in static images, but avoid dynamic false contouring.

This panel rivals CRT for motion clarity at 120Hz, however there is eye-tracking based blur at lower frame rates


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I don't recall that feature being on the newer monitors but I may be mistaken. I can say that this was definitely not the case with Pioneer's pro panels. It is not available on any of the consumer displays, and I don't think the pro line has been updated for some time now, so they are using much older panels.

Monitor mode is on every professional model going back nearly a decade..
Why would Panasonic use old panels in current products?


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I have to question your methods of testing if you think your plasma has better gradation than a CRT or the better LCD panels

24-bit computer graphics are not even a challenge, the PF, BT and VX are 30-bit panels
I can pull up a 256 level gradient and there is no banding what so ever


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There's a reason that medical displays - where gradation is critically important - are all LCD panels rather than plasmas.

Yes that reason is RF interference
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post #18 of 24 Old 10-22-2013, 07:59 AM
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What? PF50 is a current model
Sorry, you're right. Panasonic have stupid naming schemes for their displays.
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The Bodnar method is highly questionable for plasma, I have read an account where the UT50 was faster by eye but Bodnar gave the victory to a Sony LCD by ~12ms! that is simply a huge error margin.
Sounds like they were measuring the top of the LCD panel rather than the bottom by mistake.
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24-bit computer graphics are not even a challenge, the PF, BT and VX are 30-bit panels
Plasma gradation is not true gradation. The image is built up over multiple sub-frames.


But you know what? Considering Plasma is on the way out, I'm really not interested in retreading all this stuff again, and I think it's disingenuous to say that any Plasma is suitable for use as a PC monitor due to things like burn-in/image retention.
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post #19 of 24 Old 10-22-2013, 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

Sorry, you're right. Panasonic have stupid naming schemes for their displays.

Completely agree with you, their naming and marketing of professional panels is basically nonexistent.


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Sounds like they were measuring the top of the LCD panel rather than the bottom by mistake.

Sounds likely, I may run some tests of my own but that of course will involve moving a 100 pound CRT redface.gif

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Plasma gradation is not true gradation. The image is built up over multiple sub-frames.

I am just telling you what I see and that is a smooth gradient from 0 to 255

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But you know what? Considering Plasma is on the way out, I'm really not interested in retreading all this stuff again, and I think it's disingenuous to say that any Plasma is suitable for use as a PC monitor due to things like burn-in/image retention.

Its really sad that noone wants to talk about plasma because x,y,z reason and poor marketing, they are super nice monitors for gamers or video purists
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post #20 of 24 Old 10-22-2013, 04:26 PM
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Its really sad that noone wants to talk about plasma because x,y,z reason and poor marketing, they are super nice monitors for gamers or video purists

 

On my PC screen there are regions that display something and pretty much never stop displaying it.  Even in games there are always HUDs and crosshairs, etc., that never move.  None of that ever an issue for you?

 

 

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Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

But you know what? Considering Plasma is on the way out, I'm really not interested in retreading all this stuff again, and I think it's disingenuous to say that any Plasma is suitable for use as a PC monitor due to things like burn-in/image retention.

 

I don't see why.  The usability of plasma has only been argued about 2 or 3 times.  :-P  I'd just as soon never type the word again....it's starting to feel really silly.

 

 

 


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post #21 of 24 Old 10-22-2013, 07:18 PM
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Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post

On my PC screen there are regions that display something and pretty much never stop displaying it. Even in games there are always HUDs and crosshairs, etc., that never move. None of that ever an issue for you?

Good question, although this monitor seems impervious to image retention there might be a few reasons for that. I use monitor and cinema mode exclusively which aren't all that bright and the panel had many hours on it already when I purchased it. I would never use or recommend Nanodrift in its default blurring mode(called "smooth") but there is another mode which slowly moves the picture around the screen and you can choose how far it travels in any direction before making its way back, I think that is a really sensible way of preventing IR
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post #22 of 24 Old 10-22-2013, 09:13 PM
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I would never use or recommend Nanodrift in its default blurring mode(called "smooth") but there is another mode which slowly moves the picture around the screen and you can choose how far it travels in any direction before making its way back, I think that is a really sensible way of preventing IR
This crops the edges and simply spreads out the area that IR/burn-in affects.
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post #23 of 24 Old 10-22-2013, 09:22 PM
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I just turned the lights off and opened Microsoft paint to test for noise against a black background, drawing solid squares there was a feint low frequency noise between Lum 2 and Lum 19 inclusive, every other shade is perfectly solid
This really shows up in dark dungeon games, and it's obvious in dungeon games at close-viewing distances on a plasma, especially when everything is in motion.

Also, I think I see noise on all plasmas up to around Lum 40 or Lum 50. But different plasmas varies. I'm more sensitive to plasma noise. Different humans have different plasma noise sensitivites. I'm also sensitive to DLP rainbows. (I am okay with 6X colorwheels, or 3-chip DLP, though).

But I believe that your plasma, however, is far better than the other plasmas.

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BlurBusters Blog -- Eliminating Motion Blur by 90%+ on LCD for games and computers

Rooting for upcoming low-persistence rolling-scan OLEDs too!

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post #24 of 24 Old 10-22-2013, 09:54 PM
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I am just telling you what I see and that is a smooth gradient from 0 to 255

Chrono already mentioned that the banding is most apparent during motion on the panny plasma. Try opening that gradient image in a paint program and then drag it around the screen quickly. You'll see dithering and banding artifacts galore unless the pro panels are radically different from the consumer ones. Maybe pro models trade better gradation for increased motion blur?. On higher contrast stuff like whites and blacks on a gray background you'll often also see mosquito-like noise around moving outlines. Sometimes you also see red or green trails behind moving objects due to phosphor decay lag.

We also need to keep in mind that Panasonic has made changes to how they drive their panels and type of phosphors over the years. Don't assume that because your old panel behaves a certain way, that this continues on current models. Many changes occurred when they added 3D support for example.

Just curious, how far away do you sit from that 42" plasma monitor? 1080p seems like too low of a resolution for such a large monitor. Any issues with heat radiating from the display?
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