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post #1 of 3 Old 08-07-2014, 10:05 PM - Thread Starter
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Possible merits of intentional crushed blacks on OLED screens

So in the paragraphs below I'm speaking partly out of place of ignorance, so I'll just start with the TL;DR version of my question: With OLED screens now, can you imagine if intentionally crushed blacks can be more satisfying than ever and now more often have merit than they have in the past when used right, or are they now rendered more consistently pointless?


I just have this expectation that crushed blacks can become the ultimate guilty display of extra-inky blacks to really bring out the satisfying effect of exaggerating contrast.












So OLED screens are officially here for many of us, and many more will be taking the plunge shortly, allowing us to finally fully appreciate the effect of perfect black and amazing contrast, so the issue of crushed blacks has been on my mind. I speak out of a partly ignorant place I have to admit, but I expect this to be educational for us, and it makes it somewhat difficult to articulate what I want to ask. So we'll be easily freed from the type of crushed blacks that are the result of shoddy handling of black on LCD screens, but I'm sure many of you are more aware than I am that not all crushed blacks are a result of the screen's limitations, but rather the way that the authors of the content have chosen to present the content of the technology used to capture it.


I'm hearing more and more that, while it seems ideal to want to have the most possible detail in your dark areas, many actually prefer to have blacks crushed to bring out a much bolder, richer image that I guess you could say is artificially boosting the pleasant-to-the-eye effect of said rich contrast. This brings a lot of questions to my mind as we now view this with perfect black. I keep thinking of what some of my first movies I should watch on my OLED, and I just assumed stay away from movies that have reviewers complaining about crushed blacks in the blu-ray presentation, but now I'm thinking about the possible merits of crushed blacks on an OLED. So maybe it's clear that you can't really get away with murder with crushed blacks on an LCD screen, because of course you're losing that exaggerated leap in contrast staring into that sickly greyish black, and because of that, perhaps now, for the first time, the full force of the effect from choosing to crush blacks can be felt when it's meant to be a good thing.


So there is the question. Do you think crushed blacks can have merit on an OLED? Perhaps it would even be extra-satisfying now? I feel like I sometimes hear reviewers of Blu-ray disks talk about deep, inky blacks and crushed blacks as though they can't come together. I could be horribly wrong, but it seems to me that you could expect the deepest and inkiest blacks that create an even bolder contrast from at least slightly crushing blacks. But I guess that's where my understanding is limited, because even if introducing what I'm maybe mistakenly thinking of as "brightness" to your shadows and darks areas to bring out more details, maybe we should still expect deep blacks to be present and that in total detail goes up as the effect of contrast is widened. I guess the thing missing from my understanding is the number of steps of gradation in shadows and dark areas, but I assume we still benefit regardless.


Now that the technology doesn't limit us in this area, should we expect crushed blacks to become a more and more rare a trick to pull by content-producers except for extreme cases for stylistic reasons? Creating the image the content-creator envisioned accurately of course should always come first, but with display limitations in this area going away largely, do we start expecting the most natural and detailed images to prevail and assume that more-often-than-not that there is less reason to crush blacks intentionally?
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post #2 of 3 Old 08-07-2014, 10:18 PM
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im not sure what a crushed black is, possibly intentionally making it darker than normal?

I can say, that after a marathon session of viewing my oled, in a fairly dark room, i found myself comparing blacks, shadows, greys, etc during a night time drive to get some food
and the comparison wasnt intentional, i found that i was still focusing on the black levels, except in real life, it was very similar to what i saw on my oled

i cant see many negatives in crushing blacks as long as there are details in the almost black
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post #3 of 3 Old 08-07-2014, 10:47 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5x10 View Post
im not sure what a crushed black is, possibly intentionally making it darker than normal?

I can say, that after a marathon session of viewing my oled, in a fairly dark room, i found myself comparing blacks, shadows, greys, etc during a night time drive to get some food
and the comparison wasnt intentional, i found that i was still focusing on the black levels, except in real life, it was very similar to what i saw on my oled

i cant see many negatives in crushing blacks as long as there are details in the almost black
Oh that's awesome, I'm so ready for that!


So I'm sure someone with a deeper knowledge of this can clean this up, but the main feature of crushed blacks from my understanding is that you lose details in your dark areas, but in "crushing" them, ideally, you end up with a picture that, while less detailed overall in dark areas, has an overall bolder look that does come across as deeper and darker with that rich contrast effect. However, I feel like often when I've seen people discussing crushed blacks, it seems like it's usually implied that the actual black that's been "crushed" is kind of ill-looking and not deep and inky, and subtracting from the quality of the picture. But now I wonder if maybe that's mainly due to LCD woes where blacks can get crushed unintentionally where detail just sort of gets washed away in those sickly blacks.


It seems like a whole set of tricks and balancing acts to overcompensate for this or that. But now on OLED screens, I'm just wondering if those instances of intentional black crushing can really hit home, and now, while maybe there will be more instances where it's pointless to throw some details that were in the dark areas away, we still are left with the satisfying effect that should come with crushing blacks, gloriously exaggerated contrast.

Last edited by Hinsoog; 08-07-2014 at 10:50 PM.
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