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post #1 of 141 Old 08-10-2014, 05:44 PM - Thread Starter
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UHD/4K First Impressions



Mark Henninger discusses his recent experience with a UHDTV and UHD/4K content, including videos, games, web browsing, and still photos.

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What good is a UHD/4K TV without native UHD/4K content? Scott Wilkinson's recent article about whether you need native UHD/4K content got me thinking about my recent experience with a Panasonic TC-65AX800U UHDTV that I am in the process of reviewing. Prior to that TV, my experience with UHD/4K was limited to trade shows, PR events, store showrooms, and TV-testing labs. Now, I've lived with one for about a month and a half.

I'm near the end of the review process for the AX800U, which served as my primary display on my PC for the past five weeks. Fortunately, my last video-card upgrade included UHD/4K capability and a DisplayPort output, which opened up a veritable cornucopia of 4K-compatible content via the Internet.

Unlike Sony and Samsung, Panasonic doesn't have a dedicated hardware solution for UHD/4K content delivery. The AX800U can't stream UHD/4K content from Netflix—no House of Cards or Breaking Bad for me. On the other hand, it does include a DisplayPort input, which is capable of accepting 8-bit 2160p at 60 frames per second with full 4:4:4 color—in other words, it's ideal for use with a PC.

When it comes to video-game graphics, 2160p resolution is a significant improvement over 1080p. During gaming sessions, I sat about five feet away from the AX800U's 65-inch screen, close enough to appreciate the improvement in image quality afforded by six million additional pixels. I especially appreciated the decrease in stair-step artifacts, which seem to plague 1080p games, no matter how high the antialiasing setting. Without a doubt, on a properly equipped PC, UHD/4K increases the visual realism of games that support 2160p resolution with an added depth to the imagery. For games that overtaxed my video card at 2160p, I used 2560x1440 resolution and achieved 40-60 fps.

One of my favorite uses for UHD/4K is viewing still photos. For over a decade, I've shot various DSLRs that exceed UHD/4K resolution. At this point, I have many thousands of images that I can finally see in all their glory without having to make a poster-size print. Unlike movie watching, it's perfectly normal to closely approach the screen to marvel at micro details and fine textures when looking at a still photo. Thanks to UHD/4K TVs, the slideshow is back! There is no denying the impact of the extra resolution when viewing photos—it's a lot more obvious than with compressed video. There's a near limitless supply of high-resolution photos out there that meet or exceed UHD/4K resolution. As long as you appreciate visual art and photography, there is plenty of great content that takes full advantage of UHD/4K resolution—it's just not video.

For UHD/4K video, I relied on YouTube's streaming offerings. Unfortunately, there is no inexpensive, ubiquitous device—like a Roku, Apple TV, or Chromecast— that's capable of delivering UHD/4K content to any brand of UHDTV. I had to settle for highly compressed streaming content, mostly from YouTube; at least I was able to sample some previews of movies I've already seen on Blu-ray, like Man of Steel. I can't say I spent much time on YouTube, and the 2160p streams also looked great on my 1080p TVs thanks to the fact that YouTube downscales its videos. Whenever there was fast motion, the plasma rendered more detail; during relatively static scenes, the AX800U looked sharper. I suspect streaming UHD/4K video requires more bandwidth before it can beat Blu-ray's pristine 1080p in terms of overall quality. One thing is for sure, YouTube's 1080p streams are nowhere near the quality of its 2160p streams, whether viewed in native 2160p, or downscaled to 1080p.

Aside from video games and still photos, one of my favorite uses for UHD/4K is browsing the Internet. I love how text renders smoothly, as it does on a high pixel-density tablet or smartphone—the effect that Apple calls Retina. It's easy on the eyes, and the look reminds me of print instead of digital. I never thought that I'd prefer to read The New York Times using a TV, but UHD/4K made it so.

For a different sort of UHD/4K diversion, I'd like to give a shout-out to the Aeon visualizer from Soundspectrum. When I listen to music and display Aeon full-screen, the resulting UHD/4K graphics look stunning and provide the perfect accompaniment to my favorite albums. Aeon creates psychedelic abstractions that pulse to the music, using the computer's video card to render its graphics. I've enjoyed many hours relaxing to Aeon; it's a worthwhile addition to any PC, that happens to look very impressive when running at 3840x2160 resolution.

Along with the AX800U, Panasonic loaned me a UHD/4K video camera, the HX-A500, which provided me with a source of UHD/4K video that was not as compressed as what I found on YouTube. That footage turned out to be some of the best I viewed, and it cemented my belief that in its current manifestation, UHD/4K has a lot to offer anyone who creates their own content. If you have a camera or camcorder capable of capturing UHD/4K video, it makes sense to have a TV capable of displaying the footage at its native resolution.


A frame taken from UHD/4K footage, shot in Times Square with a Panasonic HX-A500. Click here for the original image.

Upscaled 1080p is the greatest disappointment in my UHD/4K experience; I don't understand the hype surrounding it. If there is any noticeable improvement in image quality over 1080p, it appears to come from the elimination of any visible pixel grid at optimum 1080p viewing distances. It did not improve the content itself. When watching reference-quality Blu-ray, my Samsung F8500 1080p plasma looked sharper than the UHDTV sitting right next to it, partly due to the superior motion rendering offered by plasma. Also, in a dark room, the plasma's superior contrast gave it the edge in terms of image quality and overall realism versus the LCD-based AX800U. My conclusion is that UHD/4K TVs desperately need more cinematic content if they are going to appeal to mainstream TV buyers.

I truly look forward to the next step in UHD/4K's evolution—namely, an expansion of the movie catalog and the end of proprietary delivery mechanisms. With DirecTV's recent announcement that it will stream UHD/4K on-demand this year, and Comcast hot on its heels with plans for a 4K app, that day looks like it will arrive sooner than later. I'm glad I got this first taste of UHD/4K out of the way; now I want to see what the rest of this year's UHDTV offerings look like, especially LG's forthcoming OLEDs.

So, what did I make of my initial UHD/4K experience? I'm hooked on the added resolution, no doubt about it. However, I'm not ready to make a UHDTV my primary display for watching movies. That honor belongs to my 1080p F8500 plasma, which offers an exceptional image when paired with Blu-ray or high-quality 1080p streams. Even so, I'm already thinking about upgrading my 1080p Vizio M3D550KD to a UHDTV after Panasonic picks up the AX800U. I know I'll miss having it on my PC. After all, I'm using the AX800U in 2160p mode to write this article. The on-screen text looks fantastic!

If you have a UHD/4K TV, let me know about your favorite forms of 4K content.

Last edited by imagic; 08-11-2014 at 06:42 AM.
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post #2 of 141 Old 08-10-2014, 06:04 PM
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So basically 4k is great as a PC monitor and for a single viewer when watching video since you have to sit 5ft from the screen to be able to notice the difference over 1080p.

I'll just mount my 70" 4k tv to a hat so that I'll be within the distance to notice any improvement.
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post #3 of 141 Old 08-10-2014, 06:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post
Unlike Sony and Samsung, Panasonic doesn't have a dedicated hardware solution for UHD/4K content delivery. The AX800U can't stream UHD/4K content from Netflix—no House of Cards or Breaking Bad for me. On the other hand, it does include a DisplayPort input, which is capable of accepting 8-bit 2160p at 60 frames per second with full 4:4:4 color—in other words, it's ideal for use with a PC.

When it comes to video-game graphics, 2160p resolution is a significant improvement over 1080p. During gaming sessions, I sat about five feet away from the AX800U's 65-inch screen, close enough to appreciate the improvement in image quality afforded by six million additional pixels. I especially appreciated the decrease in stair-step artifacts, which seem to plague 1080p games, no matter how high the antialiasing setting. Without a doubt, on a properly equipped PC, UHD/4K resolution increases the visual realism of games that support 2160p resolution with an added depth to the imagery.
that's why I want one just for this!


Quote:
For UHD/4K video, I relied on YouTube's streaming offerings. Unfortunately, there is no inexpensive, ubiquitous device—like a Roku, Apple TV, or Chromecast— that's capable of delivering UHD/4K content to any brand of UHDTV. I had to settle for highly compressed streaming content, mostly from YouTube; at least I was able to sample some previews of movies I've already seen on Blu-ray, like Man of Steel.
you my should have a look at the free movies out there like this one: http://bbb3d.renderfarming.net/download.html

there is more out and they are totally free. Sintel or Tears of steel are rendered in 4k

Tears of steel: http://mango.blender.org/download/
Sintel: http://www.sintel.org/news/sintel-4k-dcp/

true UHD with 60 fps (may your GPU an intel or nvidia or may the CPU with you X-))

Last edited by mightyhuhn; 08-10-2014 at 06:18 PM.
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post #4 of 141 Old 08-10-2014, 06:31 PM
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thanks for confirming my thoughts. i'll wait for UHD content before I buy a UHD display. unless I am in the market to upgrade projectors and the UHD models have come down in price. at that size, reduced pixel structure could be worth it.


I always thought 720p looked better on a 720p display too. there's something to be said for doing as little processing as possible. but in this case, I think it's more about the technology driving the panels. UHD isn't worth giving up plasma for me. not until oled matures just a bit more, and then I'd upgrade for the oled blacks, not the UHD, haha.

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post #5 of 141 Old 08-10-2014, 06:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Kini62 View Post
So basically 4k is great as a PC monitor and for a single viewer when watching video since you have to sit 5ft from the screen to be able to notice the difference over 1080p.

I'll just mount my 70" 4k tv to a hat so that I'll be within the distance to notice any improvement.
Let me know if Monoprice has a hat mount. That sounds cool.
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post #6 of 141 Old 08-10-2014, 06:33 PM
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With Dish Network's recent announcement that it will stream UHD/4K on-demand this year, and Comcast hot on its heels with plans for a 4K app, that day looks like it will arrive sooner than later.
Did you mean to write DirecTV instead of Dish?

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post #7 of 141 Old 08-10-2014, 06:36 PM - Thread Starter
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Did you mean to write DirecTV instead of Dish?
Sure did, thank you!

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post #8 of 141 Old 08-10-2014, 10:27 PM
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... got me thinking about my recent experience with a Panasonic TC-64AX800U UHDTV that I am in the process of reviewing.
Mark, did you mean the TC-65AX800U model?

Great review!
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post #9 of 141 Old 08-10-2014, 10:29 PM
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I can't wait until there are disc based 4K content and players that will really do these TV's justice when it comes to movies.
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post #10 of 141 Old 08-10-2014, 10:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Kilgore View Post
I can't wait until there are disc based 4K content and players that will really do these TV's justice when it comes to movies.

Probably ain't never gonna happen: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/40-fla...ue-ray-4k.html
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post #11 of 141 Old 08-10-2014, 10:59 PM
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post #12 of 141 Old 08-10-2014, 11:12 PM
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Good link, but it's not a technology issue - that was then and this is now, and the market for discs in general and blue ray in particular is not growing as expected: http://www.deadline.com/2014/01/with...estly-in-2013/
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post #13 of 141 Old 08-10-2014, 11:19 PM
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More sales of UHDTVs more chances to see UHD Blu-ray movies. /// My own guess: 2015-16
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post #14 of 141 Old 08-10-2014, 11:40 PM
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More sales of UHDTVs more chances to see UHD Blu-ray movies. /// My own guess: 2015-16

We'll see. I've noticed a large number of retailers including Target all but abandon their once-massive DVD & BlueRay sections and others like Best Buy have also cut back significantly.


It's going to be a major, major investment to roll out a new disc format and it's looking increasingly like the pay-back just won't be there.


Streaming is taking over the world (and involves much less up-front capital investment) - it just looks like the safer bet, but time will tell...
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post #15 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 01:16 AM
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Today i suffered UHD/4K assault. Every box store i was in had some form of UHD/4K set up. The one that killed it for me was Fry's. They had a UHD/4K Sony set up beside a 1080P Sony, i'm sure by mistake, i could perceive no difference between the two, from 10 feet back to over 100 feet back the picture quality was close to the same. According to the floor salesman both TV's were "tuned" for there best picture. Only noticeable difference i saw was the UHD/4K had a few more lumens output over the 1080P, i'm sure that had something to do with a 4x pixel count vs. 1080P.

There simply going to have to do better with UHD/4K before i jump in.

And the payoff is never certain: Some observers contend that a generation has already been trained to be content with the small screen.
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post #16 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 04:14 AM - Thread Starter
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I think it will happen, but hardcore videophiles may not love how it potentially manifests. I bet the same UHD/4K version you stream/download shows up as a disc-based "digital copy" that's sold with 1080p Blu-rays as part of the bundle. It would be no different than putting the movie on a USB stick or a hard drive, you just need a HEVC decoder to decode it and watch it. How long before Blu-ray players start featuring UHD/4K apps and HEVC decoding? Compare that to releasing a whole new disc-based standard.

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post #17 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 04:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post
I think it will happen, but hardcore videophiles may not love how it potentially manifests. I bet the same UHD/4K version you stream/download shows up as a disc-based "digital copy" that's sold with 1080p Blu-rays as part of the bundle.
I think you are way off. There won't be any disk/hw based 4K, and in the not to distant future, there won't even be any blurry to bundle with. The Sony numbers speak for themselves.

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post #18 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 04:57 AM - Thread Starter
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I think you are way off. There won't be any disk/hw based 4K, and in the not to distant future, there won't be any blurry to bundle with either. The Sony numbers speak for themselves.
While I am sympathetic to your position, over time I've argued with many AVS members about this topic. The fact is, rural America will remain a viable market for physical media for some time to come. Blu-ray and DVD sales will continue to shrink as urban dwellers go digital, but eventually that will level off as the practical limitations of expanding broadband service to rural areas set in.

Blu-ray isn't going to disappear tomorrow. When Wal-mart stops selling them, then the format will officially be dead.

However, I see your point. There is a small possibility that UHD/4K will be an online delivery only product. I think that would hobble the format's growth.

Idle speculation, that's all I've got at the moment.

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post #19 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 05:16 AM
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that's why I want one just for this!
Because the subject was discussed in another thread i checked out 4:4:4 on my 1080p TV. I did this by connecting my laptop to my TV by HDMI. Indeed the 4:4:4 is a improvement when using TV for internet stuff. I recommend it
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post #20 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 06:02 AM
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I am never going to give up the right to own physical media or the fight for it. When we get too lazy to get off our butts to put a disc in a player that will have better SOUND and PICTURE, we have totally given in to corporate ownership. You're cloud isn't yours. You don't own **** at Vudu or any other streaming company. Unless Fiber takes off across this country other than select markets like Kansas City and a few others, you're going to settle on over compressed 4K? Comcast and most news affiliates are still shooting in 720p, transmitting at 1080i. You know how many times I had movies that would blink out here and there over satellite VOD? Sent me right back to physical media and Comcast for tv.


And legally, you cannot tell people they own something when they buy it, and still hold it in your possession. Watch before long when Vudu, Xbox Video, etc. change it from "buy this video" to "Lifetime Streaming/Rental". They sure as hell are not going to let you download it. We need a real market crash to really set the point home. First thing that goes in peoples lives is entertainment. A lot of theaters closed up over this last recession. Steaming services would be one of the next. And they are protected under bankruptcy as to not have to provide you any refund for your giant Vudu collection you just lost. And its deservedly so.


What's more depressing is seeing this kind of logic out of a forum where pushing for the "best in AV" is more for settling for mediocre? Sad, because I would have thought that AVS Forum would have been one of the last place to give in to lower quality video through steaming versus a strong, proven physical media. This isn't so much an opinion either. Look at TV's. Plasma, best quality dead. DLP still better than LCD, dead. SED, never a chance. Now what we get now is a freakin Panel Lottery. LED is the cheapest lighting out there, with strobing, milky screens, clouding, and hazy,, really settled in a good technology didn't we? Beta was better than VHS picture wise, what did we get, the cheapest. Because a sad lot are too lazy to put a disc in the player we are getting the least expensive and cheapest video. Thanks again!

Cool Beans.

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post #21 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 06:12 AM
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I for one am admittedly holding out for physical UHD media on general principle, but between Sony's media server and Ultraflix and so on...you have to wonder. Or at least puzzle over what everybody's aiming for at this point.

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post #22 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 06:18 AM - Thread Starter
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I for one am admittedly holding out for physical UHD media on general principle, but between Sony's media server and Ultraflix and so on...you have to wonder. Or at least puzzle over what everybody's aiming for at this point.
I'd think the Blu-ray folks are holding out for a critical mass of UHTVs before attempting a new physical delivery method. Once there are enough TVs out there, something will come out. There's still too much money left on the table if you ignore everyone who doesn't have ultra-fast Internet. The real question is if online delivery will continue to lag behind physical media in terms of quality, or if UHD/4K will act as an equalizer of sorts, making VOD, streaming, and downloads a viable alternative, or even improvement, over 1080p Blu-ray. No guarantees, of course... but I hope at CEDIA 2014 the various players shed some light on the future.

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post #23 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 06:34 AM
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I have my 73" DLP for Blue Ray. I have my 50" Panasonic Plasma for my bedroom and I have a 40" Toshiba 120hz "enhanced" LED for my PC gaming station. I went from 1920x1200 on a standard PC monitor 26" to a 40" TV 1920x1080P. You can tell the difference between enhanced 120hz vs 60hz. I have seen the 4K stuff. 4K theater screens look great in movie theaters. At some point people will start to question the need for ultra resolution screens. Obviously for photo editing it's a nice feature. For PC gaming, no graphics card can really push the high end current generation game at 60FPS without SLI or Crossfire at 4K with 780Ti and some of the obscene AMD $1500 cards running in Crossfire. Does anybody know the resolution of the living world around us?

At what point will high end SLR camera's exceed the resolution of the real world the human eye sees? I am happy with 1920x1080P. I should point out my 40" Toshiba 2014 model has better blacks than my plasma and blows away my computer monitor in appearance. My old monitor is 6 years old.
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post #24 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 07:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post
I'd think the Blu-ray folks are holding out for a critical mass of UHTVs before attempting a new physical delivery method. Once there are enough TVs out there, something will come out. There's still too much money left on the table if you ignore everyone who doesn't have ultra-fast Internet. The real question is if online delivery will continue to lag behind physical media in terms of quality, or if UHD/4K will act as an equalizer of sorts, making VOD, streaming, and downloads a viable alternative, or even improvement, over 1080p Blu-ray. No guarantees, of course... but I hope at CEDIA 2)14 the various players shed some light on the future.
Let's also not forget the double, triple or now quadruple dip the studios will get by releasing the same damn movie on yet another format!
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post #25 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 07:20 AM
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it will take a lot of years be for most of the UHD movies are true UHD movies.
they will just upscale and that's it.
they need a lot of new equipment for this and cameras with more than UHD resolution for mastering reasons.
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post #26 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 07:26 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by mightyhuhn View Post
it will take a lot of years be for most of the UHD movies are true UHD movies.
they will just upscale and that's it.
they need a lot of new equipment for this and cameras with more than UHD resolution for mastering reasons.
The existing movies with the best chance of making the leap are the ones with a lot of IMAX footage, like the latest Batman or Hunger Games. The IMAX content will really pop in UHD. Older films shot in 70mm also stand a good chance of looking amazing in UHD.

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post #27 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 07:52 AM
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A lot of people seem to think that just because it's on a disk it's better or that compression is terrible. Well sorry but a lot of things we use are compressed even blurays. I found Imagic's article about going to a complete digital library interesting, because one it shows that they are getting so good with compression, and that the difference between a bluray and streaming is nearly the same. Sonys video unlimited service is a perfect example of this I've compare a lot of their movies to my blurays and honestly it's hard to tell a difference. Now understand most fear losing content, but hopefully they all come up with a way to store your content like sony deos. Also having it in the cloud is another place that your library is available just in case your hard drives etc. fail. Streaming isn't all bad guys it makes things a lot more convenient and not having to store a million disc. I believe the disc format will hang around because let's face it streaming isn't always ideal for everyone.
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post #28 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 07:59 AM
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Originally Posted by mightyhuhn View Post
it will take a lot of years be for most of the UHD movies are true UHD movies.
they will just upscale and that's it.
they need a lot of new equipment for this and cameras with more than UHD resolution for mastering reasons.
Sony has an extensive library (relatively speaking) of 4K movies. I would think they would be the best source for content. The only problem is that, as of now, you need a Sony UHD TV to take advantage. The question will be when and if Sony decides that there's more money in a universal 4K player that's compatible with any UHD TV than trying to tempt people to buy their UHD TVs to gain access to Sony content.

Of course my Sony AX100 produces as much content as I'm in the mood to produce...and these camcorders can produce utterly stunning 4K imagery.
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post #29 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 08:03 AM
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I think it will happen, but hardcore videophiles may not love how it potentially manifests. I bet the same UHD/4K version you stream/download shows up as a disc-based "digital copy" that's sold with 1080p Blu-rays as part of the bundle. It would be no different than putting the movie on a USB stick or a hard drive, you just need a HEVC decoder to decode it and watch it. How long before Blu-ray players start featuring UHD/4K apps and HEVC decoding? Compare that to releasing a whole new disc-based standard.
If I am following you correctly, you are suggesting that the 4K digital copy of the movie would be stored on a traditional BD-ROM and that you would need to transfer it to local storage (e.g. computer hard drive) in order to play it (using iTunes or a similar service) rather than actually playing it from the disc? This seems reasonable given that essentially the same method has been used for SD/HD digital copies on DVD discs, particularly for titles that were released when iTunes digital copies was originally launched. It is also technically possible given that current streaming/download bitrates for 4K content are in the 15-20 Mbps range, which is actually smaller than current 1080p blu-ray bit rates. So, it would fit on a current blu-ray disc without issue. DRM/copy protection is already taken care of by using the same method of activation used for iTunes digital copies.

While this would certainly satisfy the immediate requirement of a physical method of delivery for 4k content, eliminating the need to stream or download large files, there are a couple issues with this approach...

1) How to get the information from the blu-ray disc to local storage for those people who do not own a computer with a built-in Blu-Ray drive. Fewer and fewer computers are being sold with blu-ray drives. In fact, Apple doesn't put them in any of their Macs. Does the industry expect people to purchase external BD-ROM drives or a whole new computer to be able to use this digital copy? Or, will new stand-alone models of blu-ray players be capable of interfacing with your PC/USB/Network storage in order transfer the content on the disc to local storage, using a built-in iTunes/Vudu/Amazon app?

2) Isn't this a bit short sighted as a solution to the delivery problem? Almost everyone who has seen the "low" bit rate 4K content has acknowledged that, with existing HEVC compression ratios, most current consumer 4K content (excluding short demos) is not necessarily an improvement over a good 1080p blu-ray. While you get increased detail in some cases, you get more compression artifacts in others. Most indicate that the 15.6 or 20 Mbps bit rates were a compromise needed to make streaming a viable option for the majority of potential users and/or the providers. And most assume that as improvements in the bandwidth to people's homes are made, the bit rate of 4K streaming could be raised in order to improve quality, since it will take time (and possibly further hardware upgrades on both the provider's and consumers' ends) to reach better compression ratios than what current HEVC provides. In a few years, instead of 15-20 Mbps, we could be looking at 40+ Mbps with improved compression efficiency that could actually deliver a significant PQ improvement over current blu-ray. At that point, a 2-layer 50GB blu-ray disc would no longer be large enough to store the digital copy. Would they then start using two of our current blu-ray discs to store it or would they have to look for a new type of physical media to replace it? Or, do they hope that, by the time digital copies of 4K films exceed 50 GB in size, physical media will no longer be needed?

Last edited by HockeyoAJB; 08-11-2014 at 08:08 AM.
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post #30 of 141 Old 08-11-2014, 08:07 AM - Thread Starter
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Sony has an extensive library (relatively speaking) of 4K movies. I would think they would be the best source for content. The only problem is that, as of now, you need a Sony UHD TV to take advantage. The question will be when and if Sony decides that there's more money in a universal 4K player that's compatible with any UHD TV than trying to tempt people to buy their UHD TVs to gain access to Sony content.

Of course my Sony AX100 produces as much content as I'm in the mood to produce...and these camcorders can produce utterly stunning 4K imagery.
I was absolutely sure there would be a PlayStation 4 based UHD movie store in 2014. It's clear now that I misjudged Sony's strategy, the PS4 is doing well but it's being developed as a game machine, not a multimedia powerhouse. I think that's a shame, it could do for UHD/4K what the PS3 did for Blu-ray.

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