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post #1 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 07:19 AM - Thread Starter
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2015 Value Electronics Flat-Panel Shootout Results



The highly anticipated face-off between the flagship TVs from LG, Panasonic, Samsung, and Sony is now complete, and the winner is...

After five voting sessions and 77 valid ballots over the course of two days at the CE Week trade show, the results of the 2015 Value Electronics Flat-Panel Shootout are in. The four UHD/4K contestants were the LG 65EG9600 curved OLED ($8999 MSRP), Panasonic TC-65CX850C flat LED-LCD ($3499 UPP), Samsung UN78JS9600 curved LED-LCD ($9999 UPP), and Sony XBR-75X940C flat LED-LCD ($7999 UPP). (UPP stands for Unilateral Price Program, which is the lowest advertised and selling price authorized by the manufacturers; MSRP is the older Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price.) All three LCD TVs employ full-array LED backlighting with local dimming and VA (vertical alignment) LCD panels for better on-axis blacks, though this compromises their off-axis performance compared with IPS (in-plane switching) LCD panels.

And the winner is...

The LG 65EG9600 OLED!

But as you can see in the results from non-experts below, it was a very close race between the LG, Samsung, and Sony.


There were 72 valid ballots from non-experts; six ballots were discarded because they were not properly filled out. As you can see, the LG OLED won in five of the seven voting categories: black quality, perceived contrast, color accuracy, off-axis performance, and motion clarity. The Samsung took the top spot in screen uniformity and day mode (viewing with the lights on).

As you might expect, the LG OLED easily won the black quality, perceived contrast, and off-axis performance categories, but the others (except screen uniformity) were quite close. And the combined totals were very close as well, with the Samsung edging out the Sony for second place.

The overall ranking was the same for the five ballots submitted by experts (professional calibrators and TV reviewers), but not in all the individual category results:


Among the experts in the audience, the LG OLED won the black performance, perceived contrast, and off-axis categories, while the Samsung took the top spot for color accuracy and screen uniformity, and the Sony won for motion clarity. In the overall rankings, it was another tight race between the LG, Samsung, and Sony, with the Samsung taking second place.

I've reserved the first few comments in this thread to add the calibration results for each TV, a description of the balloting and tabulation process, some of the comments written on the ballots, and more detailed comments about the TVs' performance from my perspective. But for now, I wanted to post the voting results ASAP.

Congratulations to the LG 65EG9600, and thanks to all four companies for their excellent entries in the 2015 Value Electronics Flat-Panel Shootout! Also, many thanks to Robert Zohn, president of Value Electronics, his wife Wendy, his daughters Lianne and Katie, and his support team, Lisandro and Rogelio Maldonado, for organizing, schlepping and setting up all the equipment, and presenting the entire event at CE Week; I was amazed at how much work went into it, and I'm honored to have been part of it this year.

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post #2 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 07:20 AM - Thread Starter
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Calibration Results

Panasonic TC-65CX850C Grayscale




Panasonic TC-65CX850C Color Gamut



Panasonic TC-65CX850C Measured Data



Panasonic TC-65CX850C Calibration Notes

Setting the local-dimming control to Maximum produced the best blacks, but it also caused the gamma to take on an S-curve, which severely compromised shadow detail. Setting that control to Medium allowed me to accurately set BT.1886 gamma, but black level was quite a bit higher.

Sony XBR-75X940C Grayscale



Sony XBR-75X940C Color Gamut



Sony XBR-75X940C Measured Data



Sony XBR-75X940C Calibration Notes

There is no CMS to correct the slightly oversaturated primaries. Also, the peak luminance could not be brought down to 35 fL using only the backlight-level control alone, so I set Clearness (backlight-flashing) to 1 in order to reach the peak-luminance target.

Samsung UN78JS9500 Grayscale



Samsung UN78JS9500 Color Gamut



Samsung UN78JS9500 Measured Data



Samsung UN78JS9500 Calibration Notes

The JS9500 has a CMS, making it was possible to reduce the small errors and produce accurate BT.709 color. The color behavior is not completely linear, so rather than set the outer points for complete accuracy but degrade the quality of the lower saturation levels, I balanced the errors out across the range.

LG 65EG9600 Grayscale



LG 65EG9600 Color Gamut



LG 65EG9600 Measured Data



LG 65EG9600 Calibration Notes

The grayscale-calibration controls cannot be taken to extreme values, otherwise contouring becomes visible, even in content that is only 8-bit. For this reason, it was not possible to perfectly calibrate gamma without degrading gradation quality. Additionally, some controls produce coarse changes, for example the lack of green at 40% stimulus. The next click higher than this produced too much green, which would be a more visible error.

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post #3 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 07:20 AM - Thread Starter
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Tabulation Process

After each session of the shootout, each participant placed their ballot in a locked, clear-plastic box held by Robert Zohn's daughters Lianne and Katie. After all five sessions, they opened the box, removed the ballots, and entered the scores into a spreadsheet. Robert, calibrator David Mackenzie, presenter Rob Sabin, and myself were present during the entire process.

Anyone affiliated with LG, Panasonic, Samsung, or Sony was not allowed to vote; Lianne and Katie carefully monitored participants' badges as they put their ballots in the box to screen for these affiliations. We also scrutinized the ballots for any obvious signs of a manufacturer shill, and we found a couple that gave all 10s to one TV and much lower numbers to all the others; we didn't count those. There were also several ballots that were inscrutable (one had arrows instead of numbers—WTF?), which we tossed as well.

The seven picture-quality (PQ) ratings were not weighted—or, more accurately, they were all given equal weight. The ratings for each PQ attribute were simply averaged for each display. A few ballots were missing one or two ratings, so each average was calculated using the number of ratings in each category, not the total number of valid ballots. The averages of each PQ category for each TV were then averaged to obtain the final results.

As I mentioned in the OP, we ended up with a total of 72 valid ballots from non-experts and five ballots from professional calibrators or TV reviewers. Robert, David, Rob, and I did not vote.

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post #4 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 07:20 AM - Thread Starter
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Which TV Do You Think is Best, and Why?

Out of the 72 valid ballots from non-experts, 33 named the LG as the best, while 16 picked the Sony, 15 chose the Samsung, and one participant thought the Panasonic was best (though that person wrote no comment about why they made that choice, and it doesn't look like a shill ballot, since they gave very high scores to everything). Several people entered two TVs as a tie, including two for the LG and Sony, one for the LG and Samsung, and one for the Samsung and Sony; I guess we didn't make it clear enough that we wanted everyone to choose only one TV. One participant wrote, "None, they each had different defects," and two ballots had no selection at all.

As you might expect, many of those who picked the LG cited blacks, contrast, and off-axis performance as the reasons for their choice. Some of them also mentioned the OLED's screen-uniformity problem with darkened side edges on dark content, but that didn't dissuade them from picking the LG anyway. One comment was, "Emulates my plasma the closest," while another was, "Plasma-like blacks." One participant who chose the LG cited the Panasonic as their favorite LCD in the shootout.

A few who chose the Samsung cited its low input-lag time (21 ms, the lowest of the bunch) as one of the reasons. And several commented that the LG's screen-uniformity issue tipped them toward the Samsung. One comment was, "Not great in anything but good in everything," while another wrote, "Least amount of obvious flaws."

Among those who chose the Sony, several cited great color, uniformity, and shadow detail as well as the LG's uniformity problem, and quite a few comments included a preference for flat over curved TVs. Another common comment was that it had the best overall balance of qualities and no significant weaknesses. One participant said the Sony's picture was "film-like."

Interestingly, one participant who picked the Sony as the best said the Samsung looked "unnatural," while one of those who chose the Samsung said it had a "more natural feeling overall."

Among the five professionals who submitted a ballot, two picked the Samsung, two tapped the Sony, and one chose the LG (interesting, since their tabulated results matched the ranking of the non-expert results). The reasons for the Samsung picks were, "Holds its own with OLED blacks and contrast ratio and outperforms in most other areas" and "LG was going to be best, but side uniformity; Samsung had best overall picture."

The two who chose the Sony said, "Best overall balance of qualities" and "The LG scored the best, but it suffered from dark edge blotchiness during some content display, which keeps it from winning." Of course, the one who chose the LG said simply, "Black levels."
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post #5 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 07:21 AM - Thread Starter
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While I didn't vote in the shootout, I certainly formed some opinions about the contenders. I'd also like to address some of the comments I've read and heard about the event.

After 10 years of holding the shootout at the Value Electronics store in Scarsdale, NY, this is the first time it was held at a neutral location, which helps address the concern I've heard that the event is tainted by the sales angle. I asked Robert Zohn about the impact of the shootout on his dealer relationship with the manufacturers, and he said it was difficult—after all, there's one winner, and the other companies aren't happy they didn't win. But he is committed to allowing consumers and industry professionals to see as many production samples of flagship TVs as possible—including those he doesn't sell—side by side and fully calibrated to the best of their ability.

Another allegation has been that the TVs were supplied by the manufacturers, which is patently false—with one exception this year. The LG, Samsung, and Sony TVs were randomly selected from Robert's store inventory, while the Panasonic was supplied by the manufacturer because the very first production samples arrived in the US only days before the event. If he could have, Robert would have purchased a 65CX850 at another store, but they were not available at retail yet. (Our deepest thanks to Panasonic for moving heaven and earth—almost literally—to get that TV to us in time for the shootout.)

What about having screens of different sizes? It was impossible to have all screens the same size—the Sony X940C is available only at 75 inches, and the LG EG9600 and Panasonic CX850 max out at 65 inches. We could have chosen the Samsung UN65JS9500 or UN78JS9500, which would mean having three 65-inchers and one 75-incher or two 65-inchers and two larger screens (75 and 78 inches). We decided to go with the latter choice, but that was a judgment call.

Many AVS members have commented that price and value should be taken into account in the scoring. However, this shootout has always been exclusively about picture quality; it does not take price, features, user interface, or any other criteria into consideration. This is how Robert originally designed the event, and that orientation has not changed in its 11-year history.

Another related comment is that the shootout should include step-down or mid-level models that more people can actually afford. But Robert's explicit goal is to present only flagship TVs, under the assumption that flagships represent the best that a manufacturer can do in terms of picture quality. I know that isn't always true, but it is mostly true. A shootout of mid-level TVs is a great idea, and one I hope to pursue at some point in the future, but by definition, that's not what this event is about.

I've heard and read many comments that the ballot was designed to give OLED an unfair advantage. I don't see how—the ballot includes various picture-quality attributes that should be examined with any TV, regardless of its underlying technology. Of course, OLED will be superior in the depth of its blacks and its off-axis performance compared with LCD. And perceived contrast is likely to be better as well, though with full-array local dimming and greater light output, high-end LCDs can exhibit superb—perhaps even better—contrast. But those are attributes that any reviewer would look at with any TV, and OLED naturally excels in these areas. Does that mean we shouldn't include them in the ballot? Not in my book.

This year, we added screen uniformity as a separate category, and it happened to put the LG OLED at a distinct disadvantage because of the weird darkening along the side edges. This problem manifested itself at low APLs (average picture levels), though it was also clearly visible in some cases of not-so-dark images—for example, in the orange menu of the AVS HD 709 program, the sides were darker orange than the center. Should we not have included screen uniformity as a ballot category because it gave the LCDs an advantage in that respect? Not as far as I'm concerned.

LG sent an engineer from Korea to the event, who said the side-edge darkening has something to do with how the electronics address the pixels, but we did not get a definitive explanation. Calibrator David Mackenzie confirmed that the issue could not be mitigated by adjusting the picture controls. Tim Alessi, LG's product-development manager, acknowledged that the problem is endemic—which was demonstrated by trying two samples from Robert's inventory—and that LG is working diligently to correct it.

Some have noted that HDR content was not used in the shootout, but that is because only one of the TVs—the Samsung JS9500—currently has HDR capabilities; the others will get these capabilities in a future firmware update. A brilliant demonstration of HDR and a comparison with SDR was presented by Joe Kane on two Samsung TVs, a UN65JS9500 and UN65JU7100, at CE Week—in the same room—but not during the shootout. Shootout participants had an opportunity to learn about HDR from a true master of the art and see it under excellent conditions, and I hope they took advantage of that.

Another common complaint is that we didn't evaluate UHD content on these UHDTVs. (We did play some UHD content from a Sony FMP-X10 server before and after the evaluation process.) Certainly, there is a growing amount of UHD content available via streaming and downloading, but as of today, very little of it includes high dynamic range (HDR) or wide color gamut (WCG), so we decided to calibrate the TVs to BT.709 color and BT.1886 gamma and present mostly Blu-ray content. Blu-ray has the same dynamic range and color gamut as most currently available UHD content, so things like color accuracy and contrast would be the same whether we played HD or UHD content. Next year, I expect there will be sufficient HDR/WCG content—and TVs that can reproduce it—to warrant including it in the evaluation content.

Many have asked why we didn't include upscaling from HD to UHD in the evaluation. We discussed adding this category to the ballot, but we decided not to because the upscaling in virtually all high-end sets is quite good these days. Also, each session was unavoidably time-limited, because the shootout had to share the room with two other demos in an alternating fashion, so adding a category that we believed all the contenders would do well at seemed impractical. However, I can see a valid argument for including it anyway, which we may well do next year.

This year, the ballot was changed to more accurately reflect subjective impressions; for example, unlike past years, this year's ballot replaced "black level" with "black quality" (which includes depth of black and shadow detail), "contrast ratio" with "perceived contrast," and "motion resolution" with "motion clarity." The older categories are actually objective measurements, which are included in the calibration results.

We also added off-axis performance and screen uniformity, which used to be part of "overall picture quality," a voting category that was dropped from this year's ballot because it is too vague. As I mentioned earlier, we felt that these attributes are not unreasonable to examine with any TV; in particular, off-axis performance is important for many buyers, even though it might not be important to true videophiles, who sit as close as possible to the on-axis position.

Even though we omitted overall picture quality from the scoring, we wanted to get a sense of which TV each participant thought was best overall. So we added this question to the ballot: "Which TV do you think is the best, and why?" This allowed each participant to apply their own weighting—some might put blacks at the top of their priorities, while others (say, sports fans) might think motion clarity is most important, which would influence which TV they thought was the best. (Some voters took things like flat versus curved screens into account as well.) We did not include this info in the tabulated results, but we did count how many chose each TV, and you can see a summary of those results in the comment above.

I was actually somewhat surprised that the LG OLED won the ballot tabulation and the "which is best" question among the non-experts despite its screen-uniformity issue. (It also won the ballot tabulation among the professionals, but not the "which is best" question.) Of course, the OLED's blacks and contrast were spectacular—though the black level seemed to float a bit in some dark scenes—and it's off-axis performance killed the LCDs, as you would expect.

For me, the LG's uniformity problem is a deal-breaker, and it's color was often clearly different than all the LCDs, with too much cyan in the blues. Of course, OLED technology is extremely promising; without those two flaws, it would beat the LCDs by a mile instead of a whisker as it did this year.

The Panasonic had the best color accuracy and widest maximum color gamut, but its blacks were quite a bit less deep than the others, taking it out of contention for me. According to David Mackenzie, he could have set the local-dimming control to its maximum strength, which would have deepened the blacks considerably, but that also took the gamma far from the target of BT.1886, thus compromising shadow detail. The mandate of the shootout was to get as close to that gamma as possible, so he set the local-dimming control one step down from maximum, which allowed him to nail the BT.1886 gamma at the expense of deeper blacks.

The Sony and Samsung were extremely close in my view; I found it difficult to select one over the other. The Sony had better blacks and motion clarity, while the Samsung had better color accuracy and screen uniformity. The Sony does not have a CMS (color-management system) to adjust the colors—which were slightly oversaturated—and maximizing its backlight scanning to improve motion clarity reduced the brightness dramatically.

Speaking of brightness, the Sony's peak brightness could not be reduced to 35 fL with the backlight-level control alone, and David did not want to do it by lowering the contrast control, which would have reduced the overall contrast of the picture without lowering the black level. So he decided to set the backlight-flashing control, called Clearness, to "1," which reduced the peak brightness to around 35 fL and improved motion clarity as a bonus.

I don't typically watch with the lights on in my black-hole theater, so I don't need high peak luminance—in fact, I prefer 30 fL to 35. Plus, I like the fact that the Samsung has HDR capabilities now rather than having to wait for a firmware upgrade, and the TV's hardware can be updated with a new One Connect Box. Given all that, I decided I liked the Samsung just a smidge better than the Sony. But the Sony also paints a beautiful picture, so I can easily see someone else making the other choice based on their preferences.

As with any major event that undergoes major changes, I recognize that improvements can be made, and if I'm involved next year, I intend to make as many as I can. For example, I want to find a way to increase the amount of time for each session to allow for longer consideration of each category and more Q&A. Other likely changes include adding an HD-to-UHD upscaling test and native UHD content with HDR/WCG.

Above all, I want this event to be as fair and transparent as possible, and if we fell short of that ideal, I can assure you that I will work to raise that bar as much as I can. My only interest is the truth about how well each TV performs to bring consumers the best possible visual experience. The Value Electronics Flat-Panel Shootout provides a rare opportunity for consumers to examine the best TV from each manufacturer, side by side and fully calibrated, showing the same content in a well-controlled viewing environment. To be involved in such an event is an honor, and I look forward to making it even better next year.

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post #6 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 07:28 AM
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Not surprising the OLED won. I like it the best too, but maybe not the best for the $.
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post #7 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 07:32 AM
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It is a shame that for the important things like color accuracy, screen uniformity and even motion clarity the LG was not good, so clearly Blacks and contrast saved it's butt. I would be curious as to any comment as to how any of these hold up to the last gen Samsung and Panny plasmas.
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post #8 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 07:32 AM
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Thanks for the report, Scott. No surprise to me that the LG won.
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post #9 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 07:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Wilkinson View Post


The highly anticipated face-off between the flagship TVs from LG, Panasonic, Samsung, and Sony is now complete, and the winner is...

After five voting sessions and 77 valid ballots over the course of two days at the CE Week trade show, the results of the 2015 Value Electronics Flat-Panel Shootout are in. The four contestants were a LG 65EG9600 curved OLED, Panasonic TC-65CX850C flat LED-LCD, Samsung UN78JS9600 curved LED-LCD, and Sony XBR-75X940C flat LED-LCD. All three LCD TVs employ full-array LED backlighting with local dimming and VA (vertical alignment) LCD panels for better on-axis blacks, though this compromises their off-axis performance compared with IPS (in-plane switching) LCD panels.

And the winner is...

The LG 65EG9600 OLED!

But as you can see in the results from non-experts below, it was a very close race between the LG, Samsung, and Sony.


There were 72 valid ballots from non-experts; six ballots were discarded because they were not properly filled out. As you can see, the LG OLED won in five of the seven voting categories: black quality, perceived contrast, color accuracy, off-axis performance, and motion clarity. The Samsung took the top spot in screen uniformity and day mode (viewing with the lights on).

As you might expect, the LG OLED easily won the black quality, perceived contrast, and off-axis performance categories, but the others (except screen uniformity) were quite close. And the combined totals were very close as well, with the Samsung edging out the Sony for second place.

The overall ranking was the same for the five ballots submitted by experts (professional calibrators and TV reviewers), but not in all the individual category results:


Among the experts in the audience, the LG OLED won the black performance, perceived contrast, and off-axis categories, while the Samsung took the top spot for color accuracy and screen uniformity, and the Sony won for motion clarity. In the overall rankings, it was another tight race between the LG, Samsung, and Sony, with the Samsung taking second place.

I've reserved the first few comments in this thread to add the calibration results for each TV, a description of the balloting and tabulation process, some of the comments written on the ballots, and more detailed comments about the TVs' performance from my perspective. But for now, I wanted to post the voting results ASAP.

Congratulations to the LG 65EG9600, and thanks to all four companies for their excellent entries in the 2015 Value Electronics Flat-Panel Shootout!

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Scott: Do you have the results for people's response to the question of which TV was their over-all favorite?
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post #10 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 07:51 AM
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Wow based on the other thread you would have thought LG was in last place.

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post #11 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 07:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Wilkinson View Post


The highly anticipated face-off between the flagship TVs from LG, Panasonic, Samsung, and Sony is now complete, and the winner is...

After five voting sessions and 77 valid ballots over the course of two days at the CE Week trade show, the results of the 2015 Value Electronics Flat-Panel Shootout are in. The four contestants were the LG 65EG9600 curved OLED, Panasonic TC-65CX850C flat LED-LCD, Samsung UN78JS9600 curved LED-LCD, and Sony XBR-75X940C flat LED-LCD. All three LCD TVs employ full-array LED backlighting with local dimming and VA (vertical alignment) LCD panels for better on-axis blacks, though this compromises their off-axis performance compared with IPS (in-plane switching) LCD panels.

And the winner is...

The LG 65EG9600 OLED!

But as you can see in the results from non-experts below, it was a very close race between the LG, Samsung, and Sony.


There were 72 valid ballots from non-experts; six ballots were discarded because they were not properly filled out. As you can see, the LG OLED won in five of the seven voting categories: black quality, perceived contrast, color accuracy, off-axis performance, and motion clarity. The Samsung took the top spot in screen uniformity and day mode (viewing with the lights on).

As you might expect, the LG OLED easily won the black quality, perceived contrast, and off-axis performance categories, but the others (except screen uniformity) were quite close. And the combined totals were very close as well, with the Samsung edging out the Sony for second place.

The overall ranking was the same for the five ballots submitted by experts (professional calibrators and TV reviewers), but not in all the individual category results:


Among the experts in the audience, the LG OLED won the black performance, perceived contrast, and off-axis categories, while the Samsung took the top spot for color accuracy and screen uniformity, and the Sony won for motion clarity. In the overall rankings, it was another tight race between the LG, Samsung, and Sony, with the Samsung taking second place.

I've reserved the first few comments in this thread to add the calibration results for each TV, a description of the balloting and tabulation process, some of the comments written on the ballots, and more detailed comments about the TVs' performance from my perspective. But for now, I wanted to post the voting results ASAP.

Congratulations to the LG 65EG9600, and thanks to all four companies for their excellent entries in the 2015 Value Electronics Flat-Panel Shootout! Also, many thanks to Robert Zohn, president of Value Electronics, his wife Wendy, his daughters Lianne and Katie, and his entire team for organizing, schlepping and setting up all the equipment, and presenting the entire event at CE Week; I was amazed at how much work went into it, and I'm honored to have been part of it this year.

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When I compared OLED to LCD it don't take genius to figure who makes better picture or video Quality.
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post #12 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 07:58 AM
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Not surprising the OLED won. I like it the best too, but maybe not the best for the $.

Well, after reading some of the comments made yesterday about the LG you might have been surprised, I certainly am a bit after yesterday.

Based on the posts from yesterday by various people you would have expected the Sony and Samsung to come out on top of the LG with ease, based mostly on the very negative comments regarding the "black sides" issue of the LG with dark content.

I really wonder how this issue affects normal viewing, considering it still came out on top, and if it is limited to a number of sets or each and every 9600 out there. Let's hope LG pays close attention and comes up with a way to fix this.

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post #13 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:01 AM - Thread Starter
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Scott: Do you have the results for people's response to the question of which TV was their over-all favorite?
Yes; I'll include that in the reserved comment about ballot comments, since that was not included in the tabulation.

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post #14 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TVuc View Post
Scott: Do you have the results for people's response to the question of which TV was their over-all favorite?
Yes, I'm very interested in this as well since the LG has been trashed in the other thread due to its horrendous nonuniformity. I think the ballot was stacked in the OLED's favor, the fact that it didn't blow the others away indicates to me that it was much closer than it should have been.
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post #15 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:09 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by avdoc View Post
Yes, I'm very interested in this as well since the LG has been trashed in the other thread due to its horrendous nonuniformity. I think the ballot was stacked in the OLED's favor, the fact that it didn't blow the others away indicates to me that it was much closer than it should have been.
How was the ballot stacked in the OLED's favor? The picture-quality attributes are those you would evaluate with any TV.
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post #16 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:10 AM
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Weird results considering reviews on the samsung and panasonic panels and the overall imprssions of the oled by forum members.
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post #17 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:11 AM
 
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Surprised OLED won with blk crush and wrong colours . they were mesmerized by the blacks and contrast..Sony last place for colours ouch..
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post #18 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:13 AM
 
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thank you scott this was awesome for the us @ home ...
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post #19 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:15 AM
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Wow based on the other thread you would have thought LG was in last place.
Yeah! but looking at the scoring you can see why. The high Scores for black level and contrast offset a lot of the other categories which were scored lower but looking at how close it was you can say pretty much you cant go wrong with the sony samsung or LG but if you factor in price. It would suggest most bang for your buck would be the sony. based on it being 8k vs 10k for the JS78 or 9k for the smaller LG.
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post #20 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:17 AM
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Who were the experts this year?
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post #21 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:28 AM
 
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Interesting the overall summary reult scoring was the same for the experts and audience this year .

I'm not suprised Samsung finished second in overall scoring with both panels they looked pretty good in the store.

OTOH I still have not seen the X940C so I have no opinion on that set presumably it's pretty good .
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post #22 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:29 AM
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I'm not going to lie, I'm pretty shocked that the Sony had the worst color accuracy. Not shocked that the LG OLED won though. OLED tech excels at the foundation of PQ/IQ.

Thanks for the info, and if the people read this, thank for the show once again!
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post #23 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:30 AM
 
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that only tells that Blacklevel and Contrast is still King and what gets the highest scores.
nothing has changed there.

you can run a Ferrari with an Volvo engine and still that car will draw attention to it
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post #24 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:31 AM
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Interesting results, thanks for the post!

Biggest surprise for me is the screen uniformity scores for the LG OLED. I havent watched the video of the event, but would be very interested in hearing some expert discussion of the issue with the LG.

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post #25 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:31 AM
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Panasonic 65CX850U getting crushed, that's a shame considering the raving it had with reviewers. Had high hopes for Panasonic this year.
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post #26 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:31 AM
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Thanks, Scott. I now look forward to this shootout every year.
One question; I am surprised there was not a review category for the upscale properties of these UHD sets. Any reason for not including this category?
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post #27 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:38 AM
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What surprised me the most is the fact the five ballots from the experts ranked the "amazingly FABU" LG OLED an average of 8.31 (out of maximum of 10) while ranking those "promising/yet to be proven UHD LCD" sets from Samsung at 8.20 and the Sony at 8.03, and the 72 ballots ranking from non-experts followed closely.
Isn't that a rather small difference in overall performance to justify all this hoopla we've been hearing about OLED tech as well as its steep pricing differential versus UHD LCD sets ?
I can only imagine that had they presented native HDR material on the Samsung set next to the LG OLED set displaying the same material but downconverted to "standard mode" (non-HDR), the majority of voters would have picked the Samsung as their favorite, or am I assuming too much ?
I for one feel a lot better about purchasing current top-of-the-line UHD sets insofar as brightness/contrast performance are concerned, as long as they use Full-Array Local-Dimming technology with as many "inteligente" zones as possible...

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post #28 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:38 AM
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Average scores without off-axis category:

1) Samsung - 8.54
2) Sony - 8.4
3) LG - 8.14
4) Panasonic - 7.134

As you can see, the off-axis viewing angle performance is what carries the OLED to the top. With that aside, it's rather handily bested by both the Samsung and Sony sets.
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post #29 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:43 AM
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After seeing the uniformity issue that the LG had, I find the results beyond bizarre...especially from professionals.

You'd have to totally ignore such a major issue to rank the LG first...and this coming from one of their biggest 'fanboys' prior to becoming so aware of the issue.

In another thread I said I would have ranked the LG first if it had not had that issue, but geez Louise, how can you ignore it.

And the Samsung had better off-axis than the Sony? I must have been at a different shootout.
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post #30 of 1566 Old 06-26-2015, 08:44 AM
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I think the issue here is that there is no real penalty for failing to make a minimum score in any single category. The LG has the lowest score of any of the four TVs in a single category.
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