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post #541 of 11252 Old 05-28-2008, 08:14 AM - Thread Starter
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Samsung 12.1-inch WXGA AMOLED panel using MOS-TFT technology
27 May 2008




At SID 2008, Samsung concentrated on displaying AMOLED applications including a 31-inch full HDTV, 14-inch HDTV, 3D display panel and several other AMOLED applications.

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Samsung 12.1-inch WXGA AMOLED panel using MOS-TFT technology
28 May 2008




Samsung displayed a 12.1-inch WXGA AMOLED panel using new MOS-TFT technology at the recent SID 2008 electronic display trade show.
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post #542 of 11252 Old 05-30-2008, 10:51 AM - Thread Starter
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Sony's Stringer Promises 27-inch OLED TV 'fairly Soon'
28 May 2008



Sony 27” OLED Prototype


Sony plans to launch a much larger version of its impressive OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) television within the next year, CEO Howard Stringer said Wednesday.

Sony launched its first OLED TV, an 11-inch model, in late 2007. The set, which also has the distinction of being the first commercial OLED TV in the world, won great acclaim thanks to the smoother, sharper and more richly colored images it offered over today's LCD (liquid crystal display) and PDP (plasma display panel) technologies.

At the same time Sony began showing a prototype 27-inch OLED screen and last month in Tokyo showed an OLED screen that was just 0.3 millimeters thick. Stringer, speaking at The Wall Street Journal's "D: All Things Digital" conference in Carlsbad, California, on Wednesday, introduced the thin prototype and talked about commercialization.

"This is 0.3 millimeters wide, it's a glass, we can produce this in plastic and you can wrap it around your arm, we're not quite sure why you would want to," Stringer told Walt Mossberg, a columnist for the newspaper and co-host of the event. "We're looking for applications for the next generation of the plastic version but this will come out in a 27-inch version fairly soon."

"Within the next 12 months, we haven't given a date," he said when asked to be more specific on timing.

Stringer didn't give much away when it came to pricing. The 11-inch model, which Sony calls the XEL-1, carries a relatively high price-tag of US$2,500.

"It's a complicated process and obviously we are working very hard to find out how to mass-produce it but until then it's very expensive," said Stringer.

Stringer's reference to a plastic OLED panel was to a prototype announced by the company in May 2007. Then it showed a small 2.5-inch OLED manufactured on a plastic substrate. The screen has a resolution of 160 pixels by 120 pixels and showed full-motion video while being bent and rolled.

Sony hasn't announced any sales targets for its OLED televisions but said earlier this month that it plans to sell 17 million LCD televisions in the fiscal year from April. That's a jump of about 7 million sets on the previous year. Sony hopes to achieve this by producing more models for the mid-market based on panels it will procure from Sharp. High-end sets will continue to feature panels produced by S-LCD, the LCD panel manufacturing joint venture it has with Samsung Electronics.

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Sony CEO Howard Stringer: Look At Our Awesome, Expensive, Money-Losing TVs!
28 May 2008




Sony (SNE) CEO Howard Stringer uses his D6 stage time to show off his tiny, expensive OLED screens. We're told they're amazing, but that's hard to tell from a distance. We do know they're expensive: The model that's for sale is $2,500, and Howard won't venture a price for the new card-thin model. But unless you live in a very very fancy neighborhood, your neighbor won't have one anytime soon.

Transcript follows:

A couple of years ago Howard Stringer had high hopes for his e-reader. But Jeff Bezos Kindle has stolen that thunder, and we assume we might hear about that when Walt Mossberg chats with him. We definitely know we're about to see a very, very thin TV.

Howard comes out to "Turning Japanese" (do the D6 folks know what that song is supposedly about?).

So Sir Howard, how are things going? "We're coming on, I think... culturally the word "profit" is not high on anybody's agenda in Japan. We're turning that around... there's a sort of sense that we're climbing the mountain. We're nowhere near the top, we're about halfway up."

But TVs are doing well, right? Yeah, but we're not making any money: "If we have any more success we'll be bankrupt". Why can't you make money? It's a commoditzed business. Lots of overhead from old biz we've exited, and race for market share puts pressure on prices.

What's next, beyond the LCD? LCD has had a good run, has plenty of life in it. But now getting excited about OLED. Very expensive at the moment, but is in the market. $2,500 for an 11" screen. DreamWorks guys like it a lot. I have one on my desk. It's really, really bright. Time to see the demo:

As we worried, it's really really hard to get a sense of what an OLED screen looks like when you're looking at on stage. But, as predicted, here comes the 0.3 mm thick OLED, thickness of a playing card. Will come out in 27-inch version fairly soon. Not at mass market quantity, and it will be "quite expensive... the only people who can buy one are in this room."

Do you believe that this will supplant LCD? "I'm biased. I have mine on my desk, and I haven't turned on the wall screen since I've had it. It's a perfect television companion."

Making these panels yourself? Yes. Very technologically sophisticated. Can't outsource.
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post #543 of 11252 Old 06-05-2008, 11:51 AM - Thread Starter
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Oxide Semiconductors: Potential Revolutionary AMOLED Fabrication Technology
3 June 2008



IGZO based 12.1″ WXGA AMOLED


SID, the display industry's leading annual academic conference, is always a great source of information on R&D into future display technologies. Crystallization of a-Si to p-Si and its application to AMOLED fabrication have been a favorite topic of the symposium for several years now. However, looking over the proceedings of this year's recently held conference, there anecdotally seems to be shift in focus; I could only find one paper on LTPS crystallization for AMOLED backplanes. Instead, a variety of papers promote using oxide semiconductors as a panacea to technical and cost issues that continue to restrict the growth of the AMOLED industry.

Samsung SDI's development of a 12.1″ WXGA AMOLED (see Figure 1) highlighted the potential of this technology. The company used amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) to replace silicon as the semiconducting layer of the TFT backplane.

A staggered gate and etch stop layer TFT design (see Figure 2) was employed to prevent degradation of the subthreshold gate swing and uniformity of the threshold voltage.



Staggered gate and etch stop layer TFT design


Although IGZO TFTs have much lower mobility than p-Si based TFTs formed by ELA (Excimer Laser Annealing), at around 10 cm2/V-sec, mobility is greater than 10X that of a-Si TFTs and more than sufficient to drive OLEDs.

Advantages of IGZO compared to conventional p-Si TFTs include
  • Deposited by PVD at low temperatures that might enable use of flexible or low-cost soda lime substrates
  • Can be fabricated on conventional a-Si TFT lines at relatively low cost and scaled to large substrates (i.e., Gen 7 or larger)
  • The smooth surface morphology of IGZO enables a clean interface with the gate insulator to provide a higher breakdown field
  • Transparency
  • Good uniformity and stability
  • TFT characteristics are controllable by the metal composition and deposition parameters
In other words, oxide semiconductors are potentially a revolutionary technology that would negate the need for Si crystallization and enable large size, high quality, low-cost AMOLED displays.

Whether or not this will actually happen is still to be determined. Oxide semiconductor technology for display applications is not a mature technology and repeatability is said to be a significant issue. Currently all AMOLEDs in mass production are fabricated with some version of ELA or solid phase crystallization. Sony is investing in a dTLA (Diode Thermal Laser Annealing) pilot line to prove the manufacturability of its µc-Si technology. Others pursuing direct deposit p-Si, RTA (Rapid Thermal Annealing) and other techniques to overcome the continued uniformity, cost and scaling problems related to ELA. But, at least, the strong interest by the SID paper selection committee and the impressive results shown by Samsung SDI and others, suggest that oxide semiconductors are a technology to keep a close eye on when evaluating future AMOLED opportunity.
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post #544 of 11252 Old 06-05-2008, 04:32 PM
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So, I can get a 50'' OLED TV when? 2012?

-Adam
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post #545 of 11252 Old 06-10-2008, 12:13 PM - Thread Starter
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LG Display shows 15-inch XGA OLED TV
20 May 2008

LG Display one of the world’s leading TFT-LCD manufacturers, today announced its plans to showcase its latest next-generation displays at SID’s Display Week 2008 (May 18-23 in Los Angeles, Calif.).

“LG Display continues to pave the way for the future of displays through its leadership and unrivaled technical advances. We recently announced our elliptical and circular shaped LCDs, and there are many additional, exciting demonstrations to see at our booth this year,” noted Mr. In Jae Jeung, LG Display’s Chief Technology Officer and Vice President.

LG Display shows a a-Si AMOLED panel with 15 inch and XGA resolution, with an contrast ratio from 10.000:1, and a 4-inch qVGA flexible AMOLED display on metal foil with increased flexibility and durability.

LG Display’s expert team will also present 12 technical papers and 10 posters on topics including 15-inch TFT LCDs produced with TFT and color filter substrates via roll-to-roll printing and a-Si 15-inch AM OLED.

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LG Display Dual-plate OLED Display (DOD) at SID 2008
24 May 2008




OLED displays are marvelous, at least the prototypes that I have seen at SID 2008. OLEDs are super thin, colors are brilliant and black levels are truly kuro! But there are many challenges to OLED displays becoming the next display standard. A LOT. One challenge is the short lifetimes of the OLED materials that lasts, at most, about 30,000 hours (Sony’s claim for its XEL-1 OLED TV’s lifetime). Another challenge is differential aging where brightness is lost at different rates leading to discoloration of the OLED display.

Another challenge is that in most cases OLED has to use a TFT backplane made from a Low Temperature Poly-Silicon (LTPS) process due to the need for higher electron mobility leading to faster performance. Well LTPS is a difficult process that has lower than wanted yields and is rather expensive.




LG Display showcased a concept called Dual-plate OLED (DOD) that uses the encapsulation glass as a OLED substrate and connects to an a-Si TFT backplane via a contact spacer. The contact spacer has a dual role: it is used as a spacer but also as a contact between the TFT backplane and the top OLED substrate. This allows for use of a-Si based backplane that is easier, more affordable and has high yields. The DOD prototype was rather large at 15″. Cheaper and larger OLEDs, I’m all for that! But I’m not holding my breath.
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post #546 of 11252 Old 06-13-2008, 01:27 PM - Thread Starter
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CMEL AMOLED panel yield expected to reach 85% by end of 2008
12 June 2008

Chi Mei EL (CMEL), a fully owned subsidiary of Chi Mei Optoelectronics (CMO), expects its yield for AMOLED panels rise to 85% by the end of 2008 from the present 70%, and the company is mulling installing a new production line (5G or 5.5G) for the segment sometime in the future, according to company president Douglas Park.

CMEL, which is the only Taiwan-based company that has started volume production of AMOLED panels, currently offers a range of panels sized at 2-inch QCIF+, 2.4-inch QVGA, 2.8-inch QVGA, 3.4-inch WQVGA, and 4.3-inch WQVGA. It is also developing a 7.6-inch WVGA panel, which will be volume produced in the fourth quarter this year, Park revealed.

Park said the company's second production line, which is being constructed, will become operational in October. Total output from the two lines will reach 800,000 units (2.8-inch equivalent) per month, he added.

CMEL is aiming to enter the large-size segment in 2010, Park said. The company is showcasing a 25-inch AMOLED panel at Display Taiwan 2008.

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LG Display Launches OLED Production Line
13 June 2008

LG Display formally launched an organic light emitting diode (OLED) division at its Gumi plant in North Gyeongsang Province on Thursday.

OLED is touted as a driving force in the next-generation display field, and companies like Sony and Samsung Electronics have already entered the business. Because it does not require additional backlight, OLED panels can be made thinner than 1 millimeter.

LG Display will first focus on developing and producing small products but expand business to producing medium-sized to large televisions, the company said.

LG Display developed an active-matrix OLED (AMOLED) for a 20.1-inch television in 2004, and was the first in the world to produce a 4-inch flexible OLED in May 2007.
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post #547 of 11252 Old 06-13-2008, 09:01 PM
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Wait, even small OLED panels only have 70% yields?

Haven't they been making small OLEDs for cell phones and other small devices for years?
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post #548 of 11252 Old 06-14-2008, 08:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmbphan041 View Post

So, I can get a 50'' OLED TV when? 2012?


Just a guess. . .

Lets see - a 27" but priced out of range in 2009.

Maybe a 42" very very expensive model by 2010.

Might see units in 50" range by 2012 - but start saving your pennies. I'll bet it'll be closer to 2015 before mere mortals wil be able to afford them in the 50" range.

Maybe - An affordable one by 2015 (if something doesn't come around in the meantime. . .)

In otherwords - OLED is still way too speculative at this point - Both LCD and Plasma will continue to improve and get cheaper. . . I think they'll have those black levels pretty well nailed down by then, also brighter more effecient displays, full implementation of 10 lumen technology in plasmas, LED backlighting in LCDs and thin form factors in both. . . I don't know what OLED will really offer at that point to make it worth the extra Xthousand dollars. . .

Anyway, I'm not holding my breath.
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post #549 of 11252 Old 06-17-2008, 06:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 10th St. View Post

Just a guess. . .

Lets see - a 27" but priced out of range in 2009.

Maybe a 42" very very expensive model by 2010.

Might see units in 50" range by 2012 - but start saving your pennies. I'll bet it'll be closer to 2015 before mere mortals wil be able to afford them in the 50" range.

Maybe - An affordable one by 2015 (if something doesn't come around in the meantime. . .)

In otherwords - OLED is still way too speculative at this point - Both LCD and Plasma will continue to improve and get cheaper. . . I think they'll have those black levels pretty well nailed down by then, also brighter more effecient displays, full implementation of 10 lumen technology in plasmas, LED backlighting in LCDs and thin form factors in both. . . I don't know what OLED will really offer at that point to make it worth the extra Xthousand dollars. . .

Anyway, I'm not holding my breath.

I agree with you. If they keep stringing this out, its gonna be in the same boat as SED. If it lives or dies, it doesn't matter, because either way, it is good for consumers...better competition drives better improvements in existing technology.
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post #550 of 11252 Old 06-18-2008, 09:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 10th St. View Post

Just a guess. . .

Lets see - a 27" but priced out of range in 2009.

Maybe a 42" very very expensive model by 2010.

Might see units in 50" range by 2012 - but start saving your pennies. I'll bet it'll be closer to 2015 before mere mortals wil be able to afford them in the 50" range.

Maybe - An affordable one by 2015 (if something doesn't come around in the meantime. . .)

In otherwords - OLED is still way too speculative at this point - Both LCD and Plasma will continue to improve and get cheaper. . . I think they'll have those black levels pretty well nailed down by then, also brighter more effecient displays, full implementation of 10 lumen technology in plasmas, LED backlighting in LCDs and thin form factors in both. . . I don't know what OLED will really offer at that point to make it worth the extra Xthousand dollars. . .

Anyway, I'm not holding my breath.


Well there are a few issues where LCD (even LED-backlit) and Plasma still mostly fall short:


Motion Resolution

Viewing Angles


In both these areas lcd and plasma still fall short of the performance enjoyed for years (really for _generations_) in CRTs.

I have a nice 42" lcd, but am thinking of picking up a used 40" Sony HD-capable CRT, because I watch a lot of sports, usually with with several friends over, and the lcds and plasmas I have/my friends have just don't cut it on either motion handling or viewing angles.
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post #551 of 11252 Old 06-18-2008, 09:51 AM
 
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Originally Posted by dlp755 View Post

Well there are a few issues where LCD (even LED-backlit) and Plasma still mostly fall short:


Motion Resolution

Viewing Angles


In both these areas lcd and plasma still fall short of the performance enjoyed for years (really for _generations_) in CRTs.

I have a nice 42" lcd, but am thinking of picking up a used 40" Sony HD-capable CRT, because I watch a lot of sports, usually with with several friends over, and the lcds and plasmas I have/my friends have just don't cut it on either motion handling or viewing angles.

Plasmas have motion and viewing angle problems? Which plasmas have you been viewing as my off axis picture is very good and fast motion sports are awesome as I've been watching a lot of soccer and car racing and you don't get much more motion than that, oh and I've been doing it on a 50" set.
No way would I ever go back to a weigh a ton elephant like the 40" Sony.
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post #552 of 11252 Old 06-18-2008, 10:22 AM
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Plasmas don't have viewing angle problems, but LCD's do.

I second Maxdog's comment. I used to have a Sony HD 32" CRT and dumped it for a 50" plasma 6 years ago. I'd never look at a CRT again. They're pretty well extinct now anyway.
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post #553 of 11252 Old 06-18-2008, 12:06 PM
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I used to have a Sony HD 32" CRT and dumped it for a 50" plasma 6 years ago. I'd never look at a CRT again. They're pretty well extinct now anyway.[/quote]


I sure would look back at a crt if there was a 42" full 1080p crt tv. Besides, quality weighs.
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post #554 of 11252 Old 06-18-2008, 09:51 PM
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I find I like the CRTs a lot better than Plasmas. LCDs I find horrible for TV. they just don't cut it as a home theater monitor.
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post #555 of 11252 Old 06-19-2008, 06:13 AM
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That 27" Sony looks nice. However, until there is a 60"+ affordable one this won't mean much to me.

However, something to keep in mind when talking price on these is to consider Sony's first SXRD. The first SXRD, the Qualia, ran about $12k. The second gen SXRD came out in less than a years time(the 60XBR1) and retailed for $5k. You never know.
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post #556 of 11252 Old 06-19-2008, 07:12 AM
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Now if only they'd give SED a second chance, then we'd have something to compare OLED against when it came to better display technology. Most certainly would've been a heck of a lot cheaper.

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post #557 of 11252 Old 06-19-2008, 07:56 AM
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I'm surprised LCD is so prominent. The lack of screen uniformity and poor viewing angle makes it a horrible choice in my opinion for home theater. It would have made more sense to me to stick with CRT for 20-27" sets and go with Plasma for anything larger than that.

LCD as a TV I find to be not even a reasonable option for my home theater. Perhaps as a kitchen TV or something that is not home theater I can see though. But I don't understand why people would spend lots of money for an LCD home theater TV with the limitations it has.
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post #558 of 11252 Old 06-20-2008, 02:00 PM
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Interesting feature here from Kevin Miller who just visited the Sony plant regarding OLED. http://www.tweaktv.com/the-miller-ch...nel-hdtvs.html
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post #559 of 11252 Old 06-24-2008, 01:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmaynan View Post

I'm surprised LCD is so prominent. The lack of screen uniformity and poor viewing angle makes it a horrible choice in my opinion for home theater. It would have made more sense to me to stick with CRT for 20-27" sets and go with Plasma for anything larger than that.

LCD as a TV I find to be not even a reasonable option for my home theater. Perhaps as a kitchen TV or something that is not home theater I can see though. But I don't understand why people would spend lots of money for an LCD home theater TV with the limitations it has.

But CRT isn't flat and is so heavy! (I'm being sarcastic of course. BTW: Even plasma had poor PQ compared to CRT until recently, so maybe in that ideal world we could use CRTs up to 34" and start plasmas at 50"...a gap in between as it would have taken a lot more inches before plasma started to look more competive in PQ. Of course now though we have Kuro and even LCDs at least look better than they did...)
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post #560 of 11252 Old 06-24-2008, 06:34 AM
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Possibly big news out of Panasonic: http://gizmodo.com/5019072/panasonic...n-sale-by-2011


That could be sweet. If true, of course.

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post #561 of 11252 Old 06-24-2008, 06:45 AM
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post #562 of 11252 Old 06-24-2008, 06:51 AM
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And Gizmodo is reporting a price of only $1400 or so for that size. If so, that's a lot sooner than I expected given Sony's pace. . .If true - this may be a serious contender in 5 years from now for both the plasma and lcd markets (though 5 years from now I also imagine the technology in those two display technologies will be quite impressive even as compared with the latest models available today).
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post #563 of 11252 Old 06-24-2008, 06:53 AM
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Originally Posted by jayhawk11 View Post

Possibly big news out of Panasonic: http://gizmodo.com/5019072/panasonic...n-sale-by-2011


That could be sweet. If true, of course.

If true -this is the first realistic price point to make major inroads into the market. . .

Let me know when the 60" OLEDs are selling for $2000.00
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post #564 of 11252 Old 06-24-2008, 07:28 AM
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I bought my Panasonic 50" 10UKA just a few months ago. One of the main reasons I chose this display was the ridiculously low price of a 50" plasma panel of this quality AND the fact I know my next TV purchase will be an OLED. I mean, Kuro this and Kuro that, but everything I read on OLED makes it sound like the greatest thing since..... you guessed it..... sliced bread.

So I am very much anxious to see these displays becoming main-stream.

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post #565 of 11252 Old 06-24-2008, 05:26 PM
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Yes this is some good info.

Chris
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post #566 of 11252 Old 06-24-2008, 05:38 PM
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Do we know whether OLED technology has developed to the point where it would make a great TV, as opposed to having incredible wow factor? Do images look realistic? Does motion? Is it pleasant to watch a movie on an OLED?

Sorry for being out of the loop on this stuff.
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post #567 of 11252 Old 06-24-2008, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by johnnylighton View Post

Do we know whether OLED technology has developed to the point where it would make a great TV, as opposed to having incredible wow factor? Do images look realistic? Does motion? Is it pleasant to watch a movie on an OLED?

Sorry for being out of the loop on this stuff.

Until i saw Sony's unit all the OLED demo sets I've seen at shows looked like crap. Sony's looked amazing and did everything you mentioned beautifully. It is a tiny screen though of course, so I still need to see a 50"+ OLED before I'll be sure it's the holy grail.
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post #568 of 11252 Old 06-25-2008, 10:16 AM - Thread Starter
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Matsushita Planning 37-inch OLED TVs?
24 June 2008

Reports have Japan's Matsushita aiming to mass-produce 37-inch OLED televisions within three years, potentially jump-starting the OLED market.

According to the Japanese trade daily Sankei Shimbun, electronics giant Matsushita—still in the process of transitioning its corporate identity to its better-known sub-brand Panasonic—is putting the finishing touches on plans to mass-produce 37-inch OLED televisions within three years. If the plans bear out, it would make Matsushita the first manufacturer producing OLED televisions over 30 inches in size, and could enable Matsushita to challenge Samsung for the top spot in the flat-screen television market.

According to the report, Matsushita is considering initial prices around 150,000 Yen (roughly $1,400), although Matsushita itself said only that the company is working on commercializing OLED televisions at some point in the future.

Sony launched an 11-inch OLED television in late 2007, bringing it to the United States early this year. Japan's Toshiba and South Korea's Samsung are also developing OLED televisions, although so far Matsushita's proposed 37-inch size would be the largest of the bunch. OLED panels are considerably slimmer than traditional LCDs and use less energy since they don't require backlighting.

Late last year, Toshiba and Matsushita ditched a joint effort to enter the OLED television market with a 30-inch unit, following difficulties getting the system from research to production. They had planned to offer the 30-inch set in 2009.

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CMEL expects to volume produce AMOLED TV panels in next two to three years
25 June 2008

Chi Mei EL (CMEL) expects that its AMOLED TV-panel technologies, which are being developed with help from Kodak and DuPont, will see a breakthrough next year, and volume production may start in 2010 or 2011, according to company vice chairman Peter Chen.

When the technology is ready, CMEL –a subsidiary of Chi Mei Optoelectronics (CMO) – will then be able to work out a timetable for constructing its third production line to be dedicated to volume producing AMOLED TV panels, he said.

CMEL's yield for AMOLED panels has reached 70%, and is expected go up to 85% by the end of 2008, Chen said.

The company's second production line, which is under construction, will come online in October this year, and by then the company's monthly capacity will reach 800,000 units (2.8-inch equivalent), he added.

While CMEL demonstrated a 25-inch AMOLED panel at Display Taiwan 2008 earlier this month, Chen said that may not necessarily be the size that the company will volume produce.

As TV panels will have to be produced at 5G or above lines in order to be cost effective, CMEL is still assessing the panel size that it will make, Chen said.
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post #569 of 11252 Old 07-01-2008, 10:17 AM - Thread Starter
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Panasonic, CMEL Anticipate Volume Production of Large AMOLED-TVs in 2010 – 2011
26 June 2008

At $227 per diagonal inch (in the U.S.), Sony’s XEL-1 11-inch AMOLED TV set is a combination of technological stake in the sand, early adopter’s toy, and public relations coup. And, with a lifetime that is, according to tests supervised by Barry Young at DisplaySearch, much shorter than that claimed by Sony, the XEL-1 can also be viewed as a premature delivery.

Since the XEL-1 is clearly a triumph of public relations over sound product development, I’m only inclined to give it one-and-a-half cheers. But it does look beautiful, and the enthusiastic response people have to its screen images clearly show that AMOLED-TV will be a product category to threaten both LCDs and PDPs — but only when the technology matures a bit, screen sizes grow, and prices fall.

So when will that be? At least since last October’s FPD International in Yokohama, LG Display and CMEL have had 32-inch AMOLED-TVs on their roadmaps for late 2009 or early 2010. CMEL has been showing a 25-inch prototype and Samsung has been showing a handsome 31-inch FHD prototype, although nobody, understandably, was talking about price or volume.

The media’s recent focus on Matsushita has been on its taking over Pioneer’s plasma panel research, development, and manufacturing activities and on its assuming control of IPS Alpha, the LCD-panel manufacturer jointly owned by Matsushita, Hitachi, and Toshiba. But if you looked at the corporate fine print, you could see references to Matsushita intending to do OLED development at one of IPS Alpha’s facilities.

Still, it came as a surprise yesterday when Japan’s Sankei newspaper reported Matsushita has finalized plans to mass-produce 37-inch AMOLED-TVs within 3 years. Matsushita spokesperson Akira Kadota said his company plans to sell the 37-incher for the equivalent of $1,390.

Now, $1,390 is certainly not cheap for a 37-inch TV. Today, you can buy a Sharp LC-37D64U FHD LCD-TV for $1099 on-line from J and R, or a Sony KDL-37L4000 HD LCD-TV for $889, and equivalent sets will surely be cheaper in 2011. But it’s also not crazy to expect early adopters and demanding videophiles to buy this kind of set in significant quantities at such a price.

Also yesterday, CMEL VP Peter Chen said his company anticipates the mass production of TV-use AMOLED panels in 2010 or 2011, as reported in Digitimes. The TV panels will be made at a new third production OLED line, Chan said.

And what conclusions about CMEL’s initial volume-produced product should we draw from that 25-inch prototype we’ve seen so much of? Not much. Chen said CMEL would not mass produce that size.

So real AMOLED-TVs are coming. Not rich men’s toys, but real TVs in reasonable sizes at rational price premiums. You’ll just have to wait a couple of years.

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Samsung invests over $500 million to boost OLED production
30 June 2008

Samsung SDI said today that it will be spending over $500 million USD to boost production of next-generation OLED displays to six times its current level by mid-2009.

This latest move comes as panel makers try to get bigger shares of the growing market for OLED displays, which offer better contrast ratio, slimmer designs and better energy efficiency than current LCD or plasma displays.

Currently, however, production costs are still high, too high to make OLED TVs available to the masses.

Samsung currently produces small-sized AM-OLED screens used in watches and other handheld devices and there was no word on whether this large new investment will be to increase production of small OLED screens or for all OLED production including TVs.

Using 2-inch screens as a basis, the new investment should raise capacity from 1.5 million units a month to over 9 million by mid-2009.

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Samsung SDI to invest $529 million to up OLED output
30 June 2008

SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korean display maker Samsung SDI Co (006400.KS: Quote, Profile, Research) said on Monday it would boost production of next-generation organic displays to six times the current level by mid-2009, spending $529 million.

The move comes as leading panel makers try to grab a piece of the fast-growing market for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AM-OLED) displays, which make better-quality, slimmer and more energy-efficient screens than liquid crystal displays.

But makers need to clear hurdles such as cutting production costs and maximizing screen size in order to see an adoption in a wider range of applications.

Samsung SDI, which produces small-sized AM-OLED screens used in handheld devices, said in a filing with the local exchange that it would invest 551.8 billion won ($528.6 million) until mid-2009 to expand its AM-OLED output.

When the investment is completed, its production capacity will reach 9 million units a month in 2-inch screen terms, compared with 1.5 million currently, the company said.

Other makers are also moving fast to launch OLED products and build scale. Japan's Sony Corp (6758.T: Quote, Profile, Research) last November started selling small-sized TVs using OLED technology and Toshiba Corp (6502.T: Quote, Profile, Research) plans to ship small-to-medium-size OLED screens for mobile devices in the autumn.

Last week, Japan's Sankei Shimbun daily reported Matsushita Electric Industrial Co (6752.T: Quote, Profile, Research) is finalizing plans to mass-produce 37-inch OLED TVs in three years.

Market researcher iSuppli said in May it expected global shipments of AM-OLED panels to nearly quadruple in 2008 to 10.2 million units, with revenue reaching $225 million.

Shares in Samsung SDI ended up 0.12 percent at 83,600 won, outperforming the wider market's 0.57 percent loss.

($1=1043.8 Won)
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post #570 of 11252 Old 07-02-2008, 05:55 PM
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Originally Posted by dmbphan041 View Post

So, I can get a 50'' OLED TV when? 2012?

I don't know; butt Pana say's a 37" in 2015.
http://www.electronista.com/articles...enies.oled.tv/

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