OLED TVs: Technology Advancements Thread - Page 196 - AVS | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #5851 of 11932 Old 05-15-2013, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by rogo View Post

The proof of the pudding will be in the release of thousands of displays per month to the market, I suppose.
It still seems like a fairly non-scaleable way to make millions of TVs.

To succeed in the marketplace only pudding is not enough, full menu is required. Meaning that one 55" set is not a menu, a range of sizes is definitely needed with flagships considerably bigger than 55". Plus 4K is likely to be necessary in the menu, and all at prices that thousands of sets can be moved each month. There is no evidence OLED can provide such menu.
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post #5852 of 11932 Old 05-15-2013, 02:58 PM
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55" is not big enough. Get one to 70" that is reliable and can actually last a few years and I am there.

Louder is NOT better!
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post #5853 of 11932 Old 05-15-2013, 06:12 PM
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Originally Posted by irkuck View Post

To succeed in the marketplace only pudding is not enough, full menu is required. Meaning that one 55" set is not a menu, a range of sizes is definitely needed with flagships considerably bigger than 55". Plus 4K is likely to be necessary in the menu, and all at prices that thousands of sets can be moved each month. There is no evidence OLED can provide such menu.

I completely agree with all of this.

My pudding comments referred only to the claims that Samsung had licked its yield problems.

In other news, the temperature in Hades appears to be around 31 degrees Fahrenheit.
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There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working. (Oh, and plasma didn't die because of logistics problems, nor does OLED ship in big boxes because it comes from Korea.)
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post #5854 of 11932 Old 05-16-2013, 02:46 AM
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This thread, and the whole OLED saga, is beginning to take on Duke Nukem Forever legendary status, and we all know how that turned out !! tongue.gif
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post #5855 of 11932 Old 05-16-2013, 07:34 AM
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OLED pudding tongue.gif
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post #5856 of 11932 Old 05-16-2013, 08:14 AM
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OLED News.

Say hello to iOLED;
Quote:
NHK has a theoretical fix for OLED's theoretical longevity problem
Engadget
Also posted here in AVS Latest Industrial News.

Japan's National Broadcasting Corporation, NHK, reckons OLED displays don't last long enough. And they have a point, because OLED pixels that are exposed to the air can lose half of their brightness in just 100 days. Commercial products are of course protected from the elements, but they're not perfect. This is where iOLED comes in. NHK inverts the anode and cathode layers in traditional OLED configurations, hence the added "i", and then adds an additional protective coating above the cathode. The result is a display that retains its brightness even when not fully sealed from the environment. Hopefully, this sort of solution will make its way into OLED TVs by the time OLED TVs are actually affordable, but in the meantime we're expecting to hear more about NHK's technology (and maybe see it in action) at Display Week later this month.
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post #5857 of 11932 Old 05-16-2013, 08:51 AM
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thank you, The company is thus gearing up towards commercialization in 2007.
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post #5858 of 11932 Old 05-16-2013, 08:51 AM
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thank you, The company is thus gearing up towards commercialization in 2007. 4.gif
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post #5859 of 11932 Old 05-16-2013, 08:56 AM
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OLED will be affordable in 2020 at this rate! The Panasonic new Z60 sounds like a winer and will be available this year smile.gif
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post #5860 of 11932 Old 05-20-2013, 11:12 AM
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World’s Largest 65-inch Full HD OLED TV Panel Published By AUO

Source: http://www.hngn.com/articles/3213/20130520/world-s-largest-65-inch-full-hd-oled-panel-technology.htm

AU Optronics Corp., one of the world's leading providers of optoelectronic solutions, has published the world's largest 65-inch Full HD OLED TV panel, which will be debuted during the Display Week 2013 this week at the Vancouver Convention Centre, Canada, according to the company's news release.

Taiwan based AU Optronics Corp. submitted 13 technology papers, which will be presented during the Display Week 2013 held by the Society for Information Display (SID). These technology papers will include special features such as OLED, 3D, Flexible, and Transparent LCD. One among these will be the world's largest 65-inch Full HD OLED panel technology.

"The 65" FHD AMOLED TV panel is adopted advanced metal oxide TFT backplane and the worldwide largest Generation 6 full-size Fine Metal Mask (FMM) OLED evaporation technology,"said the press release. "The Company achieves an excellent uniformity of metal oxide TFT and panel without the color mixing by FMM technology. The panel is also embedded the self-invention pixel compensation driving technology which further improves the TFT and OLED performances."
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post #5861 of 11932 Old 05-20-2013, 05:06 PM
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So they have "published" it? Sounds really exciting to watch TV in an industry journal!

For what it's worth, there will never be a mass-produced 65" AMOLED using FMM.... Certainly not from AUO, which is ostensibly the mfg. partner of Sony and Panasonic working to develop "printable" techniques, using solution-based deposition....

In short, I'd love to find this exciting, but it's a classic OLED announcement: Something you can't buy and will never be able to.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working. (Oh, and plasma didn't die because of logistics problems, nor does OLED ship in big boxes because it comes from Korea.)
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post #5862 of 11932 Old 05-20-2013, 07:37 PM
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So OLED displays have the motion blur of an LCD and the prospect of burn-in like a plasma and this is the holy grail of display technology?
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post #5863 of 11932 Old 05-20-2013, 11:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mfogarty5 View Post

So OLED displays have the motion blur of an LCD and the prospect of burn-in like a plasma and this is the holy grail of display technology?

Since about 1% of people consider either of those a problem, yes.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working. (Oh, and plasma didn't die because of logistics problems, nor does OLED ship in big boxes because it comes from Korea.)
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post #5864 of 11932 Old 05-21-2013, 06:11 AM
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Rogo,

I enjoy reading your informative no non-sense posts so please allow me to elaborate on my post above. You said above that only 1% consider burn-in or motion blur an issue. I actually think the population scared of plasma burn-in is much higher than that, but I will go with your 1% assumption for purposes of this discussion.

You have said in many posts that OLED has an uphill battle in the marketplace because most people won't notice the difference between LCD and OLED and most of the population that can tell the difference will not be willing to pay the price premium. So aren't display manufacturers targeting the very 1% you noted above?There will be a few wealthy individuals who will purchase the latest and greatest, but it seems to me that in order for OLED to be successful in the market it has to be successful here on avsforum first because this is where people who care about the best picture quality congregate. So which group of people here do you think will purchase OLED displays? The plasma fans who dislike the motion blur of LCD or the LCD fans who do not want to worry about IR/burn-in?

It seems to me that OLED can only be successful if it has the best attributes of LCDs and plasmas and eliminates their weaknesses when in fact the truth is that it has two of the worst attributes of plasmas and LCDs: burn-in and motion blur.
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post #5865 of 11932 Old 05-21-2013, 06:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mfogarty5 View Post

It seems to me that OLED can only be successful if it has the best attributes of LCDs and plasmas and eliminates their weaknesses when in fact the truth is that it has two of the worst attributes of plasmas and LCDs: burn-in and motion blur.


So it seems to me. I keep thinking back to Mark Rejhon's pondering about the current OLED brightness not yet being enough for the to pull off a pulse technology (aka "backlight scanning" in the LCD world).

Further, just for comparative info he seemed to notice that Sony's Crystal LED (using "standard" non-organic LED's somehow smile.gif) had a pronounced flicker to them, so that he speculated that that particular technology would not be prone to the issues. I still think that as time goes on, the pursuit for longer life OLED's and a discovery of CLED-like manufacturing techniques will collide accidentally. And we'll have a series of mumbleLED options (O, iO, C, pick letters from the alphabet). If Rogo is getting ready to pounce on me, pretend I didn't say this. (LOL)

What makes mumbleLED remain the Holy Grail is all the magic that comes from emissive, plus absolutely fine-tuned control of every conceivable metric.

And if that weren't enough, apparently Holy Grail is primarily defined as Skinny to the vast majority of the public.

If you believe you can win an argument by stating that scientists "often" get things wrong, all you're doing is selectively ignoring the overwhelming legion of things they have gotten right. Viewed as an aggregate, scientists very very rarely get things wrong.
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post #5866 of 11932 Old 05-21-2013, 10:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mfogarty5 View Post

Rogo,

I enjoy reading your informative no non-sense posts so please allow me to elaborate on my post above. You said above that only 1% consider burn-in or motion blur an issue. I actually think the population scared of plasma burn-in is much higher than that, but I will go with your 1% assumption for purposes of this discussion.

You have said in many posts that OLED has an uphill battle in the marketplace because most people won't notice the difference between LCD and OLED and most of the population that can tell the difference will not be willing to pay the price premium. So aren't display manufacturers targeting the very 1% you noted above?There will be a few wealthy individuals who will purchase the latest and greatest, but it seems to me that in order for OLED to be successful in the market it has to be successful here on avsforum first because this is where people who care about the best picture quality congregate. So which group of people here do you think will purchase OLED displays? The plasma fans who dislike the motion blur of LCD or the LCD fans who do not want to worry about IR/burn-in?

It seems to me that OLED can only be successful if it has the best attributes of LCDs and plasmas and eliminates their weaknesses when in fact the truth is that it has two of the worst attributes of plasmas and LCDs: burn-in and motion blur.

Targeting the 1% is a surefire money-loser, unless you're in the yacht business.

Steve S.
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post #5867 of 11932 Old 05-21-2013, 11:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve S View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mfogarty5 View Post

Rogo,

I enjoy reading your informative no non-sense posts so please allow me to elaborate on my post above. You said above that only 1% consider burn-in or motion blur an issue. I actually think the population scared of plasma burn-in is much higher than that, but I will go with your 1% assumption for purposes of this discussion.

You have said in many posts that OLED has an uphill battle in the marketplace because most people won't notice the difference between LCD and OLED and most of the population that can tell the difference will not be willing to pay the price premium. So aren't display manufacturers targeting the very 1% you noted above?There will be a few wealthy individuals who will purchase the latest and greatest, but it seems to me that in order for OLED to be successful in the market it has to be successful here on avsforum first because this is where people who care about the best picture quality congregate. So which group of people here do you think will purchase OLED displays? The plasma fans who dislike the motion blur of LCD or the LCD fans who do not want to worry about IR/burn-in?

It seems to me that OLED can only be successful if it has the best attributes of LCDs and plasmas and eliminates their weaknesses when in fact the truth is that it has two of the worst attributes of plasmas and LCDs: burn-in and motion blur.

Targeting the 1% is a surefire money-loser, unless you're in the yacht business.

I don't believe it to be 1%. If you're referring to the 1% that *actually* suffer from it, then that's one thing. But the folks that believe it to be big issues are far greater than that I'm guessing.

If you believe you can win an argument by stating that scientists "often" get things wrong, all you're doing is selectively ignoring the overwhelming legion of things they have gotten right. Viewed as an aggregate, scientists very very rarely get things wrong.
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post #5868 of 11932 Old 05-21-2013, 02:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post

So it seems to me. I keep thinking back to Mark Rejhon's pondering about the current OLED brightness not yet being enough for the to pull off a pulse technology (aka "backlight scanning" in the LCD world).
You can *interpolate* instead, too. That way, you can add more Hz, and milk the OLED color gamut full-time, while reducing motion blur without losing brightness headroom (as pulsing requires). But of course, that's not good for computers and games.

Also the transistors in AMOLED slows things down a bit -- that's why IPS LCD (active matrix) is slower than TN LCD (no transistors).

Also, high speed video of the Sony Trimaster OLED display shows it flickering in a roughly 50%-50% duty cycle, which would reduce motion blur by 50%. It's probably internally run at the equivalent of 120Hz, and putting black frames in between 60Hz refreshes, to switch the pixel transistors in an AMOLED on and off.

Motion blur on an OLED is not an unsolvable problem. But it isn't a simple problem as some think. For reasons explained in recent posts in the other thread, it is currently much easier to eliminate motion blur on an TN LCD than on an OLED or IPS LCD. It's funny to see the black level holy grail solved by OLED, but the motion blur holy grail darn-near solved by LightBoost strobe backlight LCD's (which less motion blur than plasma -- even Panasonic's 2500 FFD). We can't have our cake and eat it too. Yet.

Thanks,
Mark Rejhon

www.BlurBusters.com

BlurBusters Blog -- Eliminating Motion Blur by 90%+ on LCD for games and computers

Rooting for upcoming low-persistence rolling-scan OLEDs too!

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post #5869 of 11932 Old 05-21-2013, 04:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mfogarty5 View Post

Rogo,

I enjoy reading your informative no non-sense posts so please allow me to elaborate on my post above

Anyone who enjoys my lack of nonense is free to elaborate. smile.gif
Quote:
You said above that only 1% consider burn-in or motion blur an issue. I actually think the population scared of plasma burn-in is much higher than that, but I will go with your 1% assumption for purposes of this discussion.

I agree with you on the plasma thing, too. I was being hyperbolic and flip. But we're going with it.... (Let's say 10% of people actually still worry about it if they are shopping plasmas, which are only sold on bigness or videophileness or cheapness, by the way.)
Quote:
You have said in many posts that OLED has an uphill battle in the marketplace because most people won't notice the difference between LCD and OLED and most of the population that can tell the difference will not be willing to pay the price premium. So aren't display manufacturers targeting the very 1% you noted above?There will be a few wealthy individuals who will purchase the latest and greatest, but it seems to me that in order for OLED to be successful in the market it has to be successful here on avsforum first because this is where people who care about the best picture quality congregate. So which group of people here do you think will purchase OLED displays? The plasma fans who dislike the motion blur of LCD or the LCD fans who do not want to worry about IR/burn-in?

So I think the first buyers are going to be plasma buyers. LCD buyers don't generally give a rat's hiney about picture quality. That's not to say there aren't LCD-loving videophiles, but again, look at proportions.
Quote:
It seems to me that OLED can only be successful if it has the best attributes of LCDs and plasmas and eliminates their weaknesses when in fact the truth is that it has two of the worst attributes of plasmas and LCDs: burn-in and motion blur.

So, yeah, that's not gonna help. frown.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve S View Post

Targeting the 1% is a surefire money-loser, unless you're in the yacht business.

Well, BMW does it....But in TV making you need more scale than in cars. And first-gen OLED is targeting the 0.1%, aka "yacht people."

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working. (Oh, and plasma didn't die because of logistics problems, nor does OLED ship in big boxes because it comes from Korea.)
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post #5870 of 11932 Old 05-21-2013, 06:50 PM
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Samsung-LG Misstep on TV Screens Creates Opening for Sony

Source: Bloomberg

Samsung Electronics Co. and LG Electronics Inc. are reworking their strategies for high-end TVs after spending billions of dollars on a new display technology that’s behind schedule and costs almost $10,000 a set. The misstep by the Koreans has created an opening for Sony Corp. Sharp Corp. and Chinese maker Skyworth Digital Holdings Ltd. Those companies are introducing TVs using conventional liquid-crystal displays that offer resolutions rivaling the new technology for about half the price.

The world’s two biggest television makers have struggled to profitably manufacture sets with organic light-emitting diodes, which have a brighter and sharper picture than the LCDs used in most TVs. Though both companies said they would mass-market OLED TVs last year, LG’s first model, priced at 11 million won ($9,900), hit stores in South Korea in January and Samsung still isn’t selling one.

Samsung and LG are now pivoting, with plans to boost output of LCD sets to maintain their dominance of the industry. Sony, meanwhile, is seeking to capture a greater share of the market for ultra-high definition TVs -- forecast to rise sevenfold by 2015 -- by expanding its range of LCD sets.

“Samsung and LG both misjudged the ultra-high definition market,” said Jeon Byung Ki, an analyst at E*Trade Korea Co. in Seoul. “Now they’re thinking they may have to stick with LCD technology for a while.”

Spokesmen for both Samsung and LG said their companies remain committed to OLEDs, yet they will expand their offerings of ultra-high-definition sets using LCD technology.

[Lots more in the article]
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post #5871 of 11932 Old 05-21-2013, 07:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mfogarty5 View Post

Rogo,

I've I enjoy reading your informative no non-sense posts so please allow me to elaborate on my post above. You said above that only 1% consider burn-in or motion blur an issue. I actually think the population scared of plasma burn-in is much higher than that, but I will go with your 1% assumption for purposes of this discussion.

You have said in many posts that OLED has an uphill battle in the marketplace because most people won't notice the difference between LCD and OLED and most of the population that can tell the difference will not be willing to pay the price premium. So aren't display manufacturers targeting the very 1% you noted above?There will be a few wealthy individuals who will purchase the latest and greatest, but it seems to me that in order for OLED to be successful in the market it has to be successful here on avsforum first because this is where people who care about the best picture quality congregate. So which group of people here do you think will purchase OLED displays? The plasma fans who dislike the motion blur of LCD or the LCD fans who do not want to worry about IR/burn-in?

It seems to me that OLED can only be successful if it has the best attributes of LCDs and plasmas and eliminates their weaknesses when in fact the truth is that it has two of the worst attributes of plasmas and LCDs: burn-in and motion blur.

I've been following the development of OLED displays with some interest, but I'd object to the statement that:
"...when in fact the truth is that it has two of the worst attributes of plasmas and LCDs: burn-in and motion blur".

First of all (and being a big fan of plasma displays), the 'burn-n' issue, is not nearly the same problem with today's sets as it was even 7 or 8 years ago. Sure, if you want to use it for your computer monitor, or for primarily gaming I'd stay away. But most buyers today are ignorant of the fact that plasmas when treated well the first 100 to 200 hours, and not abused thereafter, no longer have such a problem.

Secondly, I'd argue that LCD/LEDs have a MUCH bigger problem than 'motion-blur', which is their terrible tendancy for significant picture quality degradation when viewing off-axis .
THAT'S a much bigger deal IMO.

So concerning OLED displays - does anyone know if they have better off-axis picture quality than LCD/LED?
Because if not, that's a real deal breaker for me...

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post #5872 of 11932 Old 05-21-2013, 11:11 PM
 
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^The off-angle problem only bothers those who have a large enough (or widely distributed enough) group of viewers where off-axis degradation might rear its ugly head (only videophiles notably suffer from this defect, I truly believe the average joe puts it out of sight and out of mind with modern sets). I don't like it and prefer the greater versatility of Plasma viewing angles, but that is not a concern for every buyer.

OLED should certainly possess better viewing angles, though I could have sworn some CES attendees noticed some discoloration when the prototypes were viewed at a certain angular threshold.
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post #5873 of 11932 Old 05-22-2013, 01:53 AM
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Originally Posted by vinnie97 View Post

^The off-angle problem only bothers those who have a large enough (or widely distributed enough) group of viewers where off-axis degradation might rear its ugly head (only videophiles notably suffer from this defect, I truly believe the average joe puts it out of sight and out of mind with modern sets).

Respectfully, I disagree with this. I think it's not so much a videophile problem as a "where is the couch" problem. A lot of people will like TV better when this problem goes away again.
Quote:
OLED should certainly possess better viewing angles, though I could have sworn some CES attendees noticed some discoloration when the prototypes were viewed at a certain angular threshold.

Some of the 2012 prototypes were sub-optimal. By 2013 that seemed to be gone though. I expect plasama-like viewing angles from the shipping sets -- if they ever do ship.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working. (Oh, and plasma didn't die because of logistics problems, nor does OLED ship in big boxes because it comes from Korea.)
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post #5874 of 11932 Old 05-22-2013, 07:32 AM
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A few points.
Nobody would invest the billions in any new technology just to market to the upper 1% or 10% of the market. I think Samsung and LG both expect the cost of manufacture of OLED sets to be lower than the equivalent LCD set. Not today or tomorrow, but in a few years. If they achieve that, then it doesn't matter if OLED retains some weakness of LCD, provided it isn't really obvious to the majority of viewers, as long as the cost of a low end OLED panel is lower than the cost of an equivalent LCD panel, it will sell more units. Price rules. Obviously, that isn't the only consideration. If the lifespan of OLED panels were perceived to be unusually short for example, then that could cause J6P to avoid OLED unless cost were significantly lower than LCD. I'm not saying OLED will ever get there or that it will have no weaknesses.

Burn-in with plasma may not be an actual concern (I bought one in the last few months and certainly haven't worried about it), but the perception is certainly a concern. As long a J6P thinks his set might burn-in in a couple of years, he'll rethink his purchase. He may educate himself and buy one anyway, but he may just say to hell with it and buy an lcd for about the same price after looking at one and deciding he can live with the contrast or off-axis problem.

If I were a manufacturer, I'd be more concerned about an issue like burn-in than off axis or contrast. Burn-in is a demon down the road, and you can't tell just by looking at a set in the showroom how bad it might be if you buy one. OTOH, off-axis and contrast can both be demonstrated while you are in the showroom, and you can decide if you can live with it or not.

As has been said here many times, the real money to be made is not in sales to videophiles, it's in sales to the rest of the buying public, and provided the picture is decent, the average consumer cares about cost and reliability more than contrast or off-axis. Especially contrast, since most sets don't get viewed in really low light situations where you can even tell.

OLED is an active display and burn-in is a consideration with crt, plasma, and it will be with any LED based tech, or any tech where the light from an individual pixel is generated at the pixel itself and the technology shows some kind of output decay with time (which is all of them so far as I know). The only active tech that comes to mind where it doesn't come into play would be scanning laser, but I don't think we are likely to see scanning laser flat panels hanging on walls in the near future. Lots of consumers still consider burn-in an issue on plasma where the lifespan is 100k hours. For me, until shown otherwise, I would consider it a bigger risk on OLED where the lifespan is currently around 20k hours, or at least that is the number I see thrown around.

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post #5875 of 11932 Old 05-22-2013, 10:14 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

Respectfully, I disagree with this. I think it's not so much a videophile problem as a "where is the couch" problem. A lot of people will like TV better when this problem goes away again.
Perhaps so, it just seems to not make enough of an impact in comparison to the appeal of a set that resembles a torch (perhaps the defects don't readily become apparent to the buyer until viewed at home), given the lion's share of the market that LCD holds.
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post #5876 of 11932 Old 05-22-2013, 12:41 PM
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It's funny, I don't really think LCD won mostly because of "torch" capability, although I realize AVSers believe that. For years, it's been much cheaper to make and sell in the smaller sizes and so it automatically "won" the market in those sizes. It also had dozens of suppliers, to boot. Plasma is handicapped by the brightness factor, yes, but I don't think that's really been very important on the list of reasons why it's "lost". Does it matter on the margins? Absolutely, which is why Samsung produced a brighter plasma. Does it matter more now that you can finally buy 65" LCDs regularly? Absolutely.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working. (Oh, and plasma didn't die because of logistics problems, nor does OLED ship in big boxes because it comes from Korea.)
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post #5877 of 11932 Old 05-22-2013, 05:19 PM
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Not sure if it mattered to most but the heat issue was a problem for me.I have 10 year old Pioneer 433 that always raised the temperature in my room thus I passed on it for a small video room I set up in my condo.The 433 is over my fireplace but my dedicated video room has a calibrated Samsung 8500.Yes its a great picture but off axis viewing and some flashlight effects have always made me wish i had gone with a plasma.If an affordable OLED appears on market in a few years I will replace my 8500.

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post #5878 of 11932 Old 05-22-2013, 05:56 PM
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The heat issue is gone for most people, but I do think it mattered in the middle of the prior decade a lot. Once larger LCDs became viable and didn't act as radiators, a TV that did would have a negative.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working. (Oh, and plasma didn't die because of logistics problems, nor does OLED ship in big boxes because it comes from Korea.)
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post #5879 of 11932 Old 05-23-2013, 12:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Peterson View Post

Samsung-LG Misstep on TV Screens Creates Opening for Sony

Source: Bloomberg

Samsung Electronics Co. and LG Electronics Inc. are reworking their strategies for high-end TVs after spending billions of dollars on a new display technology that’s behind schedule and costs almost $10,000 a set. The misstep by the Koreans has created an opening for Sony Corp. Sharp Corp. and Chinese maker Skyworth Digital Holdings Ltd. Those companies are introducing TVs using conventional liquid-crystal displays that offer resolutions rivaling the new technology for about half the price.

[Lots more in the article]

So I read this whole thing and don't know what to make of it....

But let's take it at face value for a second....

If it's even a little bit true, the idea that lots of affordable OLED TVs are coming anytime soon is increasingly remote / absurd. I am inclined to agree with the theory that Samsung doesn't spend money improving plasma as they did if another videophile-quality technology is "just around the corner" in some affordable form...

Nothing here really changes the possible timetable I've been looking at -- 2016-17 -- but if that were to slip again, I would not be shocked.

Again, I feel foolish only for becoming briefly fooled by 2012's dog-and-pony show. The predictions before and since remain remarkably on point....

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working. (Oh, and plasma didn't die because of logistics problems, nor does OLED ship in big boxes because it comes from Korea.)
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post #5880 of 11932 Old 05-23-2013, 04:59 AM
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If Samsung and LG Display are actually planning to boost LCD output, it is news to the market. Samsung said two weeks ago that they are expanding capex spending on OLED's and LG Display indicated a month ago that they will spend half of their capex on OLED's this year and a higher percentage next year.

All of this might be a huge mistake, but there is nothing in that article that actually indicates a change in spending.
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