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post #901 of 10944 Old 02-18-2009, 06:35 PM - Thread Starter
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OLED Q&A with Dr. Udo Heider - VP of OLED unit at Merck
17 February 2008

Merck is a global pharmaceutical and chemical company based in Germany. The company designs, develops and manufactures a wide range of specialised materials including high performance light emitting materials for OLEDs. The OLED business belongs to Mercks' Liquid-Crystal (LC) unit.

I managed to conduct an interview with Dr. Udo Heider, the VP of the LC business unit at Merck (it's called the LC/OLED unit) about their OLED program.

Q: Hello Dr. Heider, and thank you for this interview. Can you describe your range of OLED products in more detail? Are you just into OLED materials, or other IPs as well?

First of all Merck's business is materials.

Merck is approaching the OLED market with both a short-term and a long-term perspective.

The current OLED market is centered around small-molecule evaporable materials. Here the electron and hole transport materials are the basis for long lifetime and high-efficiency (product) device performance and Merck considers these materials as the essential building blocks in our development and commercial portfolio. For the emitting layers, Merck has a leading market position in blue singlet materials and a strong focus on the strategic development of the highly efficient emitting materials for the next generation of OLED products.

For the long term, OLED device manufacturers are indicating a strong need for wet-processable, i.e. ink-jet OLED materials. In cooperation with key customers Merck is developing the materials that will give its customers the potential to significantly reduce factory process and equipment costs.

Q: What are the advantages of your OLED materials? Can you give us some technical details? (efficiency, lifetime, etc.)

As indicated in the above question, regarding the commercial materials Merck believes that the OLED market urgently needs lifetime and efficiency to be competitive with incumbent technologies. Commercialized Merck materials fulfill those requirements for lifetime and efficiency needed for device application.

Q: You have just announced that you will buy OLED-T's IP assets... Can you give us more info on this? How will OLED-T's material complement your own portfolio?

OLED-T based its long-term development on the close interaction with OLED customers: It has an interesting IP and material portfolio that perfectly complements Merck's IP and material product range in this field.
This deal will enable Merck to broaden its range of products on offer as well as its IP base for ongoing material developments.

Q: OLED-T has developed phosphorescent OLEDs. Some say that Universal Display owns the basic phosphorescent-OLED patents. So if someone wants to use these materials, does he need to license from UDC as well?

Whether the OLED-T phosphorescent patents will yield phosphorescent materials that can be commercialized is currently under investigation at Merck. Therefore the question on IP dependence and/or the need for a license from another company cannot be answered at this point in time.

Q: Can you name some companies that are already using your materials or IPs? Are there any products on the market that have OLEDs that are "Merck Inside"?

Basically all Merck commercial OLED activities are covered by NDAs, therefore it is not possible to disclose details and company names here.

Merck can confirm that it considers having control of marketing and sales of OLED materials as very important to understand the customers and market requirements. These are absolutely essential for us, to have the development focus exactly on those points that will enable the OLED market to grow and prosper in future.

So, Merck is participating actively with its materials in the OLED market but cannot comment further.

Q: We are taking a special interest in OLED for lighting - which you are working on. Any updates in this regard?

Merck also considers the lighting market as an additional feature and benefit that OLEDs bring to the table. Merck is both addressing this market with evaporable small-molecule materials as well as in its strategic soluble-material developments.

Here again, Merck is actively involved with materials for this developing market.

Q: Your CEO recently said that "OLEDs will not replace LCDs till 2030". Do you guys still hold this view? If so, why invest in OLED materials now?


Merck is a material supplier: Our focus is on developing materials that have the ability to enable OLEDs to be used in different products. The product-development roadmaps and timelines are in the hands of our customers.

As history shows, it can take a very long time for a new technology to fully replace an incumbent technology, i.e. there is still a market for CRT TVs. On the other hand you can see the first small OLED-TVs like the SONY XEL-1 already on the market.

Q: What do you think are the main challenges still ahead for the OLED industry?

For any new technology to replace an incumbent technology some elementary points have to be addressed.

A new technology has to bring key values to the end customer as well as to the device manufacturer. While the key values for the end customer of OLEDs are sufficiently clear to the broad community, the manufacturing yield and processes will drive the ultimate cost of the OLED product. Merck is addressing these needs from the material perspective.

Q: Where do you see Merck's OLED business five years from now?

The business is growing and most likely will continue to do so.
We will be among the top players in OLED materials.

Q: It seems like OLED prototypes were very strong in CES, but no new OLED TVs. I wonder what you guys think of that as well.

A host of very interesting OLED displays for portable media applications were promoted at CES, demonstrating the striking key features of OLEDs. This shows that OLEDs are continuing to find their way into products. To specifically comment on why OLED TVs were not so prominent at the CES would be difficult for Merck to say as we are not a device manufacturer. As you of course know, in order to successfully launch new technology products, timing and investment are the key, but it also necessary that the technology is ready to be supplied in quantities (at a reasonable cost value), with the quality of material, components, process and process technology also playing essential roles. Merck, as a material supplier, sees its role as working in close cooperation with key customers to deliver continuous material improvements that enable our customers to achieve their product roadmap targets.

Dr. Heider - thank you again for this interview. I wish you and Merck OLED unit great success in the coming years...
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post #902 of 10944 Old 02-19-2009, 06:42 PM
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Okay will do. I swear! (by this Saturday). I got my OLED right next to my "cheapy" Philips HD Tube. I got at least 2 digital cameras to choose from. I just will need to find out hot to post pics to AVS. I'm glad to help out a fellow member with my findings.

Great - look forward to the results!

I updated my 'testcard', and it's now at the native resolution of the Sony XEL-1 Also added 0-255 greyscale (each of the 256 greys is 3 pixels wide). Dunno how good it really is - I'm sure somehow here may find think of improvements/faults to it. Maybe there's a better "testcard" out there?
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post #903 of 10944 Old 02-19-2009, 07:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Tele-TV View Post

I got my OLED TV. Its obviously nice! I just wished it was 1920x1080. Instead of 980x540. Anyways...

I have not seen HD animated programming on my set yet, but tonight I have a recording set for South Park HD (2008). I saw some Sponge Bob in 4:3 (NICK HD) and it looked beautiful. And my TV was not even in VIVID mode.

Sounds nice. It is cool for a first attempt but I think Sony blew it in a number of ways. It is small yes but that is not the main thing to me. The resolution is weird and means everything must be scaled. Scaling ruins sharpness and for a set trying to show off sharpness it doesn't make sense to me. They should have at LEAST tried for 720P if they couldn't muster a full 1080.

The inputs are too limited. No VGA for PCs? Why?

Other than that the PQ from what I saw was stunning. Their next set should be interesting. I dream of a 32" at least 720P set with PC input. My Xbox 360 connected via VGA to it would be amazing. I would pay $ 4000 for one even in this terrible economy.
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post #904 of 10944 Old 02-21-2009, 05:19 AM
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Forget the OLED TVs for now. Bring on the PC monitors where consumers will accept the smaller size and love the increased PQ.
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post #905 of 10944 Old 02-24-2009, 02:51 PM
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New Samsung TL320 Camera Boasts Three-Inch AMOLED for Enhanced Viewing and Energy Efficiency

The new TL320 goes above and beyond traditional compact point-and-shoot digital cameras, offering an impressive list of features that set the camera apart from the competition. The TL320 features a Schneider lens, renowned for quality and trusted by professionals worldwide, and offers consumers a more versatile 24mm ultra-wide angle focal length paired with a powerful 5x optical zoom.

Utilizing the same advanced technologies found in its revolutionary AMOLED televisions, Samsung was able to incorporate a three-inch, 460,000-dot HVGA AMOLED screen in the new TL320, the largest AMOLED screen on a digital camera to date. In comparison to a traditional TFT-LCD screen, the TL320's AMOLED consumes less power and offers a higher contrast ratio of 10,000:1, producing darker black levels, more vibrant colors, and a brighter display which can easily be viewed outdoors and even in direct sunlight. Additionally, unlike a TFT-LCD, the TL320's AMOLED screen has the ability to display images that can be reviewed at any angle, while fully maintaining the same color gamut.
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post #906 of 10944 Old 02-25-2009, 02:06 PM
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http://techon.nikkeibp.co.jp/english...090223/166150/

Eiji Shikoh, an assistant professor at the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, developed an OLED device that emits circularly polarized light in the visible light range.

It is a basic technology to enable 3D representation on OLED and electronic paper displays. To produce the circularly polarized light in the visible light range, the spin state during the light emission process is controlled by injecting a spin-polarized carrier from the ferromagnetic negative electrode into the emission layer.

For the future, Shikoh intends to increase the degree of circular polarization so that two components, the right and left circularly polarized light, may be clearly differentiated. Through this method, he aims to realize 3D display by producing parallax images that have different information in each component.

In general, OLED devices use a nonmagnetic material such as aluminum (Al) for their negative electrodes. But the new technology uses a ferromagnetic material such as iron (Fe) for the negative electrode in order to inject spin-polarized electrons from the ferromagnetic negative electrode into the emission layer.

As a result, light emission with a circular polarization degree of about 0.5% was observed when a magnetic field intensity of 3,000Oe is applied at room temperature, Shikoh said.

It has been known that GaAs-based inorganic LEDs produce circularly polarized light by the spin injection into the emission layer. However, those LEDs cannot be used for displays, etc because they emit light in the infrared range. Moreover, the base material has to be changed in order to precisely control the colors of light emitted by inorganic light emitting devices.

With organic molecules, it is possible to precisely control the emission color by changing the functional group, Shikoh said.
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post #907 of 10944 Old 03-01-2009, 06:50 AM
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Samsung Mobile Display has their new website up. Some specs are available on their various OLED displays....plus this little snippet from their FAQ.

http://samsungsmd.com/kor/main.html

Q When will AM OLED TV panels be commercially available?

A Televisions adopting AM OLED were put out in the market in 2008 by a Japanese company. Samsung Mobile Display is planning to release a small number of them in 2009, and is planning a full-scale release in 2010.
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post #908 of 10944 Old 03-01-2009, 09:30 AM
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Makes me wonder if OLED will find its way into PC displays in the near future. I know that there are LED-backlit LCD PC monitors, but whether or not OLED will be the next thing for the higher-end displays for laptops and desktop monitors, I'm wondering if they'll be doing that this year at all.

EDIT: Oops, Neo1022 beat me to that one. Sorry about that one. Maybe Dell's next UltraSharp line may start doing this?

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post #909 of 10944 Old 03-03-2009, 10:15 AM
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Asus is considering putting an OLED into a netbook.

http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2009/03...ebit_keyboard/

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post #910 of 10944 Old 03-08-2009, 11:53 PM
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Videos on OLED were scant even a few months ago. Now they're cropping up like rabbits. Despite this, there are no vids which actually put *side by side* the picture quality next to a lesser LCD/plasma TV.

Apart from one.

A bonus if you can understand German, but otherwise, it's quite awesome to see the difference. Especially at 2:15.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pu1-pO54FMQ
Also...
http://webtv.comon.dk/index.php/video/id=862 (same vid, but better quality)

Note the increased gamut and ace contrast ratio of course. I'm not sure what LCD/plasma they're using, but I'm guessing it's fairly typical... (say 1000~2000 : 1 contrast?)

Also notice the slight flicker on the OLED at that point which helps prove that the sample and hold duty cycle is not quite 100% There's even a use for which nobody could have imagined, but is shown at the very end of the vid. That's almost worth the $2500 alone. =)
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post #911 of 10944 Old 03-09-2009, 12:52 AM
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Note that PC Magazine has some of the lowest contrast ratio numbers I have seen since they test the average contrast ratio of a calibrated display and that contrast ratio tests based only on dynamic contrast ratio would give higher contrast ratio numbers. In the PC Magazine reviews the Panasonic TH-46PZ85U had a contrast ratio of 1,408:1, the Samsung LN52A750 had a contrast ratio of 3,725:1, the Pioneer KURO PDP-5020FD had a contrast ratio of 8,809:1, and the Sony XEL-1 OLED Digital TV had a contrast ratio of 23,132:1.


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Originally Posted by twinbee View Post

Also notice the slight flicker on the OLED at that point which helps prove that the sample and hold duty cycle is not quite 100%

That would explain why the Sony XEL-1 OLED Digital TV was able to get a perfect motion resolution score. The HD Guru review said that "this production sample had superb motion resolution. Measurements using my FPD test disc indicated that the set could resolve all 540 lines (per picture height) in the moving Monoscope Pattern test."
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post #912 of 10944 Old 03-09-2009, 06:38 AM
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In those videos I think its pretty clear the sony OLED works in pulsed mode, it shows a plasma grade ammount of flicker. Everything we've heard about SAH and OLED is just BS.

I'm much more optimistic about OLED being "the next thing" after seeing this video. Once they manage to get long-lasting emmitters and production of big panel sizes, I really see OLED as the future! It's like plasma, but much more efficent and without phosphor trailing.
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post #913 of 10944 Old 03-09-2009, 07:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Daviii View Post

In those videos I think its pretty clear the sony OLED works in pulsed mode, it shows a plasma grade ammount of flicker. Everything we've heard about SAH and OLED is just BS.

I'm much more optimistic about OLED being "the next thing" after seeing this video. Once they manage to get long-lasting emmitters and production of big panel sizes, I really see OLED as the future! It's like plasma, but much more efficent and without phosphor trailing.

I've already posted numerous times that the XEL-1 has a less than 100% duty cycle. This is not news?

And what are you talking about when you say SAH and OLED is just BS? Please explain

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post #914 of 10944 Old 03-09-2009, 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted by twinbee View Post

A bonus if you can understand German, but otherwise, it's quite awesome to see the difference. Especially at 2:15.

I understand German, but he has a bit of a Danish accent .
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post #915 of 10944 Old 03-09-2009, 06:58 PM
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understand German, but he has a bit of a Danish accent

Haha, late night last night - I thought it didn't seem *quite* German...

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And what are you talking about when you say SAH and OLED is just BS?

I think I recall that one or two mentioned how they experienced blur with the Sony XEL. I have a sneaking suspicion that the pre-production model at trade shows was like this (but I could be wrong).
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post #916 of 10944 Old 03-09-2009, 07:02 PM
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Originally Posted by xrox View Post

I've already posted numerous times that the XEL-1 has a less than 100% duty cycle. This is not news?

It is one thing to read posts about it and another to see a video that shows it. As such I would personally consider a video that shows it to be news.


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Originally Posted by xrox View Post

And what are you talking about when you say SAH and OLED is just BS? Please explain

I think he is referring to posts such as this, this, this, this, this, and others like them. In other words some people would not have predicted that the first OLED TV on the market would have perfect motion resolution. That is very impressive if you think about it since the only other display that HD Guru has reviewed that had perfect motion resolution was the Samsung LN-46A950 and it used both a sequential LED backlight and motion interpolation.
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post #917 of 10944 Old 03-09-2009, 07:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Richard Paul View Post

It is one thing to read posts about it and another to see a video that shows it. As such I would personally consider a video that shows it to be news.


I think he is referring to posts such as this, this, this, this, this, and others like them. In other words some people would not have predicted that the first OLED TV on the market would have perfect motion resolution. That is very impressive if you think about it since the only other display that HD Guru has reviewed that had perfect motion resolution was the Samsung LN-46A950 and it used both a sequential LED backlight and motion interpolation.

IMO the prediciton was that OLED would require 100% duty cycles in order to get respectable lifetime numbers. If it used a less than 100% duty cycle to gain motion resolution it would take a hit in an already short lifetime. Seems that prediciton is correct.

When the XEL-1 came out touting 30K hours I was really suspect and assumed they must have used a long duty cycle. Turns out the thing flickers and has a short lifetime (5000 hours white and 17000 hours RGB) and burns in quickly.

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post #918 of 10944 Old 03-09-2009, 08:58 PM
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Originally Posted by twinbee View Post

Also notice the slight flicker on the OLED at that point which helps prove that the sample and hold duty cycle is not quite 100% There's even a use for which nobody could have imagined, but is shown at the very end of the vid. That's almost worth the $2500 alone. =)

I have seen this set in person and it doesn't flicker anywhere near as bad as this video would suggest. Most of the time you don't notice any, it mostly shows up with bright whites. You are mostly seeing the camera and TV not syncing exactly causing this. It is like when people try to take a video of a CRT, it flickers like mad.
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You are mostly seeing the camera and TV not syncing exactly causing this.

Oh I know, yes. Just like with the CRTs. Perhaps the effect can't be seen in most vids showcasing OLED because of the cheaper video camera equipment others use to film - which 'smears' out the flicker so it's not noticable.

Any idea if the OLED flickers less than an equivalent refresh rate CRT when seeing it in person?
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post #920 of 10944 Old 03-09-2009, 09:44 PM
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Originally Posted by xrox View Post

IMO the prediciton was that OLED would require 100% duty cycles in order to get respectable lifetime numbers.

Which post(s) that I linked to are you referring to or are you referring to a past prediction that you made?


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When the XEL-1 came out touting 30K hours I was really suspect and assumed they must have used a long duty cycle. Turns out the thing flickers and has a short lifetime (5000 hours white and 17000 hours RGB) and burns in quickly.

Those calculated lifetime numbers are from DisplaySearch and Sony has said that they are wrong.
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post #921 of 10944 Old 03-09-2009, 10:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Richard Paul View Post

Which post(s) that I linked to are you referring to or are you referring to a past prediction that you made?

Not referring to a post. I'm just stating where the SAH-OLED connection comes from scientifically speaking. I went through this stuff years ago in this very thread.


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Those URL="http://www.twice.com/article/CA6558309.html"]calculated lifetime numbers are from DisplaySearch[/url] and Sony has said that they are wrong.

I would love to know how Sony came up with that 30K number. At least display search documented the testing procedure and results. Based on historical marketing do you honestly want to believe Sony?

IMO Sony arrived at the 30K number through either a 100% duty cycle or very low APL. I notice that the XEL-1 has an auto-dimming feature. Maybe they used this to reach 30K?

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post #922 of 10944 Old 03-10-2009, 09:19 AM
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Originally Posted by xrox View Post

IMO the prediciton was that OLED would require 100% duty cycles in order to get respectable lifetime numbers. If it used a less than 100% duty cycle to gain motion resolution it would take a hit in an already short lifetime. Seems that prediciton is correct.

When the XEL-1 came out touting 30K hours I was really suspect and assumed they must have used a long duty cycle. Turns out the thing flickers and has a short lifetime (5000 hours white and 17000 hours RGB) and burns in quickly.

I'm not talking about predictions, I'm talking about people repeating like parrots that OLED would suffer SAH forever, and that the XEL-1 showed blur due to SAH, which is even worse in my opinion since it is not a wrong prediction, but a fanboyish lie.

Predictions use to be wrong for the TV market 99% of the time, facts are always valid. Fact is XEL-1 has perfect motion resolution. Fact is XEL-1 degrades faster than plasma. Everything else is just playing nostradamus.
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post #923 of 10944 Old 03-10-2009, 09:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Daviii View Post

I'm not talking about predictions, I'm talking about people repeating like parrots that OLED would suffer SAH forever

Well I hope I never said that because that would be wrong. What I have said is that in order to maximize lifetime OLED will have to use SAH until they make longer lived more efficient materials. Which is correct based on facts.

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....., and that the XEL-1 showed blur due to SAH, which is even worse in my opinion since it is not a wrong prediction, but a fanboyish lie.

LOL, fanboy of what? You sound a little worked up over this? Are you ok?

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Predictions use to be wrong for the TV market 99% of the time, facts are always valid. Fact is XEL-1 has perfect motion resolution. Fact is XEL-1 degrades faster than plasma. Everything else is just playing nostradamus.

LOL, not only was the prediction correct (really not a "prediction", bad word on my part) but you just agreed with it by stating the XEL-1 has great motion resolution but poor lifetime. Thank you

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post #924 of 10944 Old 03-10-2009, 06:42 PM
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I daresay this is all a short term argument. It's "more than good enough" right now, if they could produce them. The advancements clearly seem to be trending toward a high quality display, with adequate lifespan, by the time they can produce 40" plus sizes in quantity. 5 years? Think how perfected the technology may be in 10 years.

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post #925 of 10944 Old 03-10-2009, 07:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xrox View Post

I would love to know how Sony came up with that 30K number. At least display search documented the testing procedure and results. Based on historical marketing do you honestly want to believe Sony?

IMO Sony arrived at the 30K number through either a 100% duty cycle or very low APL. I notice that the XEL-1 has an auto-dimming feature. Maybe they used this to reach 30K?

I don't know how CE companies get lifetime numbers for displays. Since DisplaySearch based their lifetime numbers on calculations, and might have used different picture setting than Sony, I simply thought it was fair to mention both sides of the story.


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What I have said is that in order to maximize lifetime OLED will have to use SAH until they make longer lived more efficient materials.

What kind of duty cycle do you need with an OLED display to make it so it has perfect motion resolution and how much does that affect the lifetime?
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post #926 of 10944 Old 03-10-2009, 09:39 PM
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I don't know how CE companies get lifetime numbers for displays. Since DisplaySearch based their lifetime numbers on calculations, and might have used different picture setting than Sony, I simply thought it was fair to mention both sides of the story.

When you say "calculated" do you mean accelerated? If so, I think every all OLED materials or panels use accelerated measurements. When my company measured OLED material lifetimes they could do it in one day if I remember correctly.

Problem is that to compare results you need to match measurement parameters exactly. No one seems to do this. It is quite a mess reading through research papers on lifetimes. I read Display Search's method and it seems pretty good to me.


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What kind of duty cycle do you need with an OLED display to make it so it has perfect motion resolution and how much does that affect the lifetime?

Who knows? Motion resolution measurement is a total disaster. I can't even begin to tell you what a mess it is. There seems to be hundreds of different ways to measure it and none of them can be compared. And, there is no such thing as perfect motion resolution since all displays have a hold time, even CRT.

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post #927 of 10944 Old 03-11-2009, 01:36 AM
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When you say "calculated" do you mean accelerated?

In the twice article they refer to it as "a calculated panel lifespan".


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Who knows? Motion resolution measurement is a total disaster. I can't even begin to tell you what a mess it is. There seems to be hundreds of different ways to measure it and none of them can be compared.

There is the FPD benchmark test which was made by a few Plasma companies (Hitachi, Panasonic, and Pioneer) and is the motion resolution test used by several reviewers including HD Guru.


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And, there is no such thing as perfect motion resolution since all displays have a hold time, even CRT.

True, though it is possible to get a perfect motion resolution score on the FPD benchmark. As such what kind of duty cycle do you need with an OLED display to make it so it has a perfect motion resolution score on the FDP benchmark and how much does that affect the lifetime?
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post #928 of 10944 Old 03-11-2009, 08:27 AM
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In the twice article they refer to it as "a calculated panel lifespan".

Dsiplay Search's method looks to be extrapolated.......
http://www.cdrinfo.com/Sections/News...x?NewsId=23197
http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2008/05...rch_sony_oled/

And even HDGuru suggests what I have suggested. Essentially that Sony measures lifetime at lower average pixel levels. The XEL-1 not only has an ABL circuit but also an auto dimming circuit it seems.

http://hdguru.com/sony-xel-1-finally...al-review/242/


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There is the FPD benchmark test which was made by a few Plasma companies (Hitachi, Panasonic, and Pioneer) and is the motion resolution test used by several reviewers including HD Guru.

This test is almost useless IMO. The Adavnced PDP Development Corporation has the most accurate method to measure motion resolution that I've read about yet these reviewers will not adopt it because it is too expensive. Standard moving test patterns must be measured using a tracking camera with standard parameters such as distance, speed...etc.

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True, though it is possible to get a perfect motion resolution score on the FPD benchmark. As such what kind of duty cycle do you need with an OLED display to make it so it has a perfect motion resolution score on the FDP benchmark and how much does that affect the lifetime?

Even with the APDC method you can get a perfect score as long as the test pattern velocity is slow enough. This is why there needs to be standards.

Richard you are a smart guy who understands display measurement so think about the following: how can you measure the motion resolution of an 11" screen and compare it to the motion resolution of a 50" or 60" screen using the same test. APDC figured it out, HD Guru did not

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post #929 of 10944 Old 03-11-2009, 09:34 PM
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This test is almost useless IMO.

The FPD benchmark test is somewhat subjective since it is based on human perception, which varies from individual to individual, but it the closest thing we have to a standard motion resolution test used by third party reviewers. It is also a motion resolution test developed and used by some of the largest CE companies in the world. Panasonic has used the FPD benchmark test, which is the same test used by HD Guru, to promote their new Plasma displays coming out this year.


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Richard you are a smart guy who understands display measurement so think about the following: how can you measure the motion resolution of an 11" screen and compare it to the motion resolution of a 50" or 60" screen using the same test.

Well excluding other potential variables you could watch all the displays with the same viewing angle. That way the movement across your field of view for the test is the same regardless of whether it is 11" display or a 110" display.


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APDC figured it out, HD Guru did not

Do you know what the FPD benchmark has in terms of instructions for how to measure the motion resolution of a display?
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post #930 of 10944 Old 03-11-2009, 09:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Richard Paul View Post

The FPD benchmark test is somewhat subjective since it is based on human perception, which varies from individual to individual, but it the closest thing we have to a standard motion resolution test used by third party reviewers. It is also a motion resolution test developed and used by some of the largest CE companies in the world. Panasonic has used the FPD benchmark test, which is the same test used by HD Guru, to promote their new Plasma displays coming out this year.

I would have thought that Panasonic used the APDC method since they are part of APDC


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Well excluding other potential variables you could watch all the displays with the same viewing angle. That way the movement across your field of view for the test is the same regardless of whether it is 11" display or a 110" display.

You cannot measure something accurately by "watching it". You need a tracking camera with standardized parameters. To compare different sized screens the paramaters have to be normalized (velocity of test pattern....etc)


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Do you know what the FPD benchmark has in terms of instructions for how to measure the motion resolution of a display?

From what I read, the FPD benchmark disc was made by APDC and is the test patterns used in their method involving the tracking camera system. Using just your naked eye to read the pattern would eliminate all the standard parameters. Seems like a poor method IMO.

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