OLED TVs: Technology Advancements Thread - Page 37 - AVS Forum
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post #1081 of 11075 Old 06-02-2009, 11:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mahlerfan999 View Post

CRT flicker is awful! Why would you want to recreate that experience?

I can't really see any flicker in a CRT at 120hz. Barely even at 85hz. I'm impressed if you can. Usually I play Quake 3 at 140hz with vertical sync on and it's the smoothest gaming experience I've ever seen.
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post #1082 of 11075 Old 06-03-2009, 03:06 AM
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Would it be possible a 240Hz OLED with 75% duty cicle? IMO it would be high enough to eliminate flicker, but I'm not sure if it would be low enough to avoid blur... Any words on where the threshold for no-flicker+no-blur is?
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post #1083 of 11075 Old 06-03-2009, 07:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daviii View Post

Would it be possible a 240Hz OLED with 75% duty cicle? IMO it would be high enough to eliminate flicker, but I'm not sure if it would be low enough to avoid blur... Any words on where the threshold for no-flicker+no-blur is?

I believe we'll find out the real threshold once manufacturers start releasing new OLED TVs (not theory). So, it looks like CEDIA will be the next electronics show where more details in terms of when the next OLED TVs will be released, and if they flicker or blur.
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post #1084 of 11075 Old 06-03-2009, 07:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daviii View Post

Would it be possible a 240Hz OLED with 75% duty cicle? IMO it would be high enough to eliminate flicker, but I'm not sure if it would be low enough to avoid blur... Any words on where the threshold for no-flicker+no-blur is?

This is good thinking. Instead of BFI, just shorten the intrinsic duty cycle at 120Hz or 240Hz and you improve motion handling. The problem is that as you increase the refresh rate you decrease the effective duty cycle.

For example, 240Hz with a duty cycle of 75% without any interpolation will produce an effective duty cycle close to 100% which does not help sample and hold blur all that much.

Assuming long life, very bright EL materials I would suggest the following drive methods

120Hz with <100% duty cycle per refresh
- this will produce a flicker rate of 120Hz which is well beyond most persons threshold
- SAH blur will be reduced a little bit

240Hz with BFI and <100% duty cycle per refresh
- BFI on every second refresh will produce a 120Hz flicker
- combination of BFI and short intrinsic duty cycle per refresh will reduce SAH significantly

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post #1085 of 11075 Old 06-03-2009, 08:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xrox View Post

This is good thinking. Instead of BFI, just shorten the intrinsic duty cycle at 120Hz or 240Hz and you improve motion handling. The problem is that as you increase the refresh rate you decrease the effective duty cycle.

For example, 240Hz with a duty cycle of 75% without any interpolation will produce an effective duty cycle close to 100% which does not help sample and hold blur all that much.

Assuming long life, very bright EL materials I would suggest the following drive methods

120Hz with <100% duty cycle per refresh
- this will produce a flicker rate of 120Hz which is well beyond most persons threshold
- SAH blur will be reduced a little bit

240Hz with BFI and <100% duty cycle per refresh
- BFI on every second refresh will produce a 120Hz flicker
- combination of BFI and short intrinsic duty cycle per refresh will reduce SAH significantly

Interesting stuff.

Question though: You mention it using 120hz/240hz (multiples of 60)

What about for PAL-centric systems which are multiple of 50 (like 100hz and 200 hz)???
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post #1086 of 11075 Old 06-03-2009, 11:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xrox View Post

The problem is that as you increase the refresh rate you decrease the effective duty cycle.

you lost me on that one...did you mean increasing refresh without interpoaltion increases sample and hold?
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post #1087 of 11075 Old 06-03-2009, 11:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post

Question though: What about for PAL-centric systems which are multiple of 50 (like 100hz and 200 hz)???

I would assume that to be the case.

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post #1088 of 11075 Old 06-03-2009, 11:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borf View Post

you lost me on that one...did you mean increasing refresh without interpoaltion increases sample and hold?

Sort of. I was trying to explain that increasing the refresh of a display that has a short duty cycle per refresh actually increases the effective duty cycle due to repetition of the frames.

60Hz display
75% duty cycle per refresh
60Hz signal
= effective duty cycle of 75%
= 60Hz flicker

120Hz display
75% duty cycle per refresh
60Hz signal
no interpolation
= effective duty cycle of 88%
= 120Hz flicker

240Hz display
75% duty cycle per refresh
60Hz signal
no interpolation
= effective duty cycle of 94%
= 240Hz flicker

If however you combine this idea with BFI

240Hz display
75% duty cycle per refresh
60Hz signal
no interpolation
BFI every second refresh (refresh-black-refresh-black = 1 60Hz frame)
= effective duty cycle of 69%
= 120 Hz flicker

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post #1089 of 11075 Old 06-03-2009, 01:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xrox View Post

240Hz display
75% duty cycle per refresh
60Hz signal
no interpolation
BFI every second refresh (refresh-black-refresh-black = 1 60Hz frame)
= effective duty cycle of 69%
= 120 Hz flicker

So, even in theory, OLEDs can have full motion resolution with a flicker/refresh that is well beyond human perception (120Hz refresh on my DP900u CRT gives absolutely no perceivable flicker).
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post #1090 of 11075 Old 06-03-2009, 01:04 PM - Thread Starter
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OLED attains the vast reaches of a visual heaven heretofore beyond the eyes of today's J6P.

It's truly better than sliced bread and tastier too. OLED's got the slim and sexy shape that your wife/girlfriend could never attain - even with liposuction again!

The only detractors are secret LCD contractors... If your living room is a field of dreams, then an OLED TV is a home run!

It's truly worth any price to own something so perfectly nice.
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post #1091 of 11075 Old 06-03-2009, 01:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Isochroma View Post

OLED attains the vast reaches of a visual heaven heretofore beyond the eyes of today's J6P.

It's truly better than sliced bread and tastier too.

The only detractors are secret LCD contractors...

If your living room is a field of dreams, then an OLED TV is a home run!

It's truly worth any price to own something so perfectly nice.

I agree. And I'm sure at least the TV manufactures would like it because the manufacturing process is cheaper than any other technology used today and they will still charge more than they should and have a better profit margin than they do today.

The only downfall I see though, is that how will they make improvements in a great TV? I'm sure they don't like this aspect of it but OLED does offer many more solutions and possibilities.
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post #1092 of 11075 Old 06-03-2009, 01:42 PM
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Manufaturing cost of new tech is fairly minor compared to the cost of recouping the R&D and production line setup expenses - which is why new tech - even if it *should* be cheaper - always comes at a premium. Once initial expenditure of bringing the tech to market is more or less recouped, only then can customers really see the benefit of a cheaper manufacturing process.
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post #1093 of 11075 Old 06-03-2009, 03:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post

Interesting stuff.

Question though: You mention it using 120hz/240hz (multiples of 60)

What about for PAL-centric systems which are multiple of 50 (like 100hz and 200 hz)???

Would that even apply in the HD world? Doesn't the rest of the world clock their HDTVs at 60, regardless of line frequency? And is there even a "50" Blu-ray spec?

Reunite Pangea!
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post #1094 of 11075 Old 06-03-2009, 05:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xrox View Post

Sort of. I was trying to explain that increasing the refresh of a display that has a short duty cycle per refresh actually increases the effective duty cycle due to repetition of the frames.

60Hz display
75% duty cycle per refresh
60Hz signal
= effective duty cycle of 75%
= 60Hz flicker

120Hz display
75% duty cycle per refresh
60Hz signal
no interpolation
= effective duty cycle of 88%
= 120Hz flicker

240Hz display
75% duty cycle per refresh
60Hz signal
no interpolation
= effective duty cycle of 94%
= 240Hz flicker

If however you combine this idea with BFI

240Hz display
75% duty cycle per refresh
60Hz signal
no interpolation
BFI every second refresh (refresh-black-refresh-black = 1 60Hz frame)
= effective duty cycle of 69%
= 120 Hz flicker

yes that's what i've seen.
i know those numbers are theoretical, but to add my own experience, motion resolution even at 50% duty cycle (120hz interpolated lcd) is still far cry from crt imo.
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post #1095 of 11075 Old 06-04-2009, 10:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borf View Post

yes that's what i've seen.
i know those numbers are theoretical, but to add my own experience, motion resolution even at 50% duty cycle (120hz interpolated lcd) is still far cry from crt imo.

Perhaps Phosphorescent OLEDs can eventually reach a CRT-like experience. Maybe a luminance of 1,000 or even 3,000 cd/m2 can allow for a reduced hold time?
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post #1096 of 11075 Old 06-04-2009, 11:03 AM
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that might allow liberal use of black frame insertion (by off-setting the diminished lifetime and brightness issues). but then what do you do about BFI flicker. we run in circles without raising the frame rate. i don't believe working within the current frame rate system will show Oled's potential in motion handeling. it held back crt, plasma (and now LCD) and it will hold back Oled - so waiting for my Oled pc monitor.
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post #1097 of 11075 Old 06-04-2009, 05:45 PM - Thread Starter
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Universal Display and Samsung Present Advances in Highly Efficient, Long Lifetime Green PH-OLEDs
4 June 2009

Universal Display and Samsung Mobile Displays present advances in green Phosphorescent OLEDs at SID. This new material will be used in both hand-held devices and OLED TVs, extending lifetime and efficiency. UDC's red materials are already used in Samsung's AMOLED displays, and it's likely that we'll see Samsung use their green materials as well.

The companies showed a highly-efficient, green UniversalPHOLED material that has been used in a top-emission PHOLED device architecture. Using this approach, they achieved two milestones. A green PHOLED with NTSC color at CIE(0.20, 0.73), high luminous efficiency of 110 candelas per Ampere (cd/A), and a low voltage of 3.6 V at 3,000 candelas per square meter (cd/m2) was achieved.

A second device structure using this green PHOLED material system also achieved an ultra-high luminous efficiency of 160 cd/A along with CIE(0.28, 0.69) and low voltage of 3.8 V at 3,000 cd/m2. These compare to a standard bottom-emission device with CIE(0.33, 0.62) and 52 cd/A using this same green PHOLED material system. Replacing the green fluorescent OLED material typically used today in an AMOLED with this new green PHOLED can result in a significant 37% power savings.

The operational lifetime for this green PHOLED material system is also very good. A bottom-emission device using this material system offers > 300,000 hours to 50% (extrapolated) and 15,000 hours to 90% of the initial luminance of 1000 cd/m2 (defined as LT90). With these top-emission devices, the LT90 lifetime is 28,000 hours and 6,400 hours, respectively, for the 110 cd/A and 160 cd/A devices.
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post #1098 of 11075 Old 06-05-2009, 01:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by navychop View Post

Would that even apply in the HD world? Doesn't the rest of the world clock their HDTVs at 60, regardless of line frequency? And is there even a "50" Blu-ray spec?

I dunno

But I think some Euro-broadcasters (like BBC HD use 50 fps in their broadcasts). I'm just wondering if the 10 fps/hertz difference would be a cause of any concern (or not). Maybe xrox can answer this....

P.S.
Kudos to improvements to OLED technology from Uni/Samsung SDI

EDIT:
Oops, I guess xrox already answered that a while ago. My bad
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post #1099 of 11075 Old 06-05-2009, 04:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borf View Post

that might allow liberal use of black frame insertion (by off-setting the diminished lifetime and brightness issues). but then what do you do about BFI flicker. we run in circles without raising the frame rate. i don't believe working within the current frame rate system will show Oled's potential in motion handeling. it held back crt, plasma (and now LCD) and it will hold back Oled - so waiting for my Oled pc monitor.

Flicker can be eliminated by repeating the same frame at a higher refresh rate (e.g. 120 HZ), or by adding interpolated frames. I would guess it's just a question of materials: develop the Red and Blue PHOLED materials with enough brightness and lifetime, and together with the Green PHOLED material referenced above you have the perfect display.
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post #1100 of 11075 Old 06-05-2009, 03:31 PM - Thread Starter
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Ambipolar Organic Semiconductor Material Claims High Charge Mobility
28 May 2009



The benzodifuran derivative
announced in 2007 (left) and the
structure of new ambipolar CZBDF



The voltage and external quantum efficiency
characteristics (graph on the left) of homojunction OLED
devices with the intermediate layer doped with a dye, and
the emission of the device (picture on the lower right)


A Japanese research group claimed that it developed a new ambipolar organic semiconductor material with the "highest level" charge mobility as an amorphous material.

The material, "CZBDF," was developed based on a derivative announced by the research group, which is led by Tokyo University and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), in 2007. The derivative has a mother nucleus of "benzodifuran," an annulated π-conjugated compound containing oxygen atoms. The benzodifuran derivative is an amorphous thin film p-type semiconductor material with a high hole mobility.

This time, the research group replaced the "amine" portion in the benzodifuran derivative with "carbazole" and realized the CZBDF ambipolar material with high charge mobility. Also, the group produced a homojunction OLED device with the use of CZBDF and succeeded in achieving EL emission by using both fluorescence and phosphorescence, as well as EL emission of three primary colors of blue, green and red.

The CZBDF amorphous thin film has a hole charge mobility of 3.7 x 10-3cm2/Vs and an electron charge mobility of 4.4 x 10-3cm2/Vs. Both has a high mobility and exhibited well-balanced values, the group said. These values were measured by using the time-of-flight (TOF) method (at a field intensity of 2.5 x 105V/cm).

Furthermore, the research group produced a homojunction OLED device by vacuum vapor deposition with the use of the newly developed ambipolar material CZBDF. Specifically, indium tin oxide (ITO) on a glass substrate is used as the positive electrode, and a 150-200nm-thick organic thin film and an aluminum (Al) metal (negative electrode) are sequentially formed on the positive electrode by vacuum vapor deposition.

Using CZBDF as a single host material, the organic thin film was subjected to p-type doping in the range of 30nm from the positive electrode by co-deposition with vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), which is an inorganic oxidant. Meanwhile, an area in the range of 20nm from the negative electrode is subjected to n-type doping by co-deposition with a reductant (metal cesium). This facilitated the charge injection and transport from the electrodes to CZBDF, the research group said.

To generate three primary colors, an intermediate layer (thickness: 50-100nm), which was doped with no oxidant or reductant, was doped with a blue or green fluorescent dye, or a red phosphorescent dye. The green fluorescent dye showed a high external quantum efficiency of 4.2% at a luminance of 60,000cd/m2.

According to the research group, the following characteristics of CZBDF were believed to have contributed to the emission of three primary colors by the newly developed OLED device and its high luminous efficiency. (1) It is an ambipolar material with high balance and mobility. (2) It is a wide gap semiconductor material that has a sufficiently high energy gap (approximately 3eV) between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO). (3) It can effectively capture electric charges into the emitting dyes.

Thus far, OLED devices with a heterojunction structure composed of organic thin film layers made of five or six different types of materials have been pervasive. The research group achieved the emission of three primary colors and a high luminous efficiency by using an OLED device with a simple homojunction structure.

It expects that this achievement leads to the development of low-cost, highly-efficient OLED displays and lighting equipment. Also, the group intends to apply the new material to organic thin-film solar cells with a multilayer structure like OLEDs.

The achievement was published in the online version of German scientific magazine "Advanced Materials" May 25, 2009.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SMD unveils production ready OLED-Tvs and AMOLEDs at SID 2009
1 June 2009




Samsung Mobile Display (SMD), exhibit an extensive range of OLED and mobile LCD displays at the SID-2009 Display Week 2009.

Production-ready AM OLED-TV

SMD is exhibiting 14.1-inch and 31-inch diagonal OLED TV panels. The 31-inch is the world's first OLED display that features full HD resolution (1920 x 1080), a contrast ratio of 1,000,000:1, a color gamut of over 100% NTSC and a ultra-slim design of only 8.9mm – providing outstanding brightness and exceptional image quality. The OLED TV panels can be mass produced through the use of Fine Metal Mask (FMM) technology.

Active Matrix AMOLED for the Future

SMD is showing the world’s thinnest “flapping” OLED panel, one that can flutter in a breeze. The super-thin panel is only 0.05mm thin, about one tenth the thickness of OLED panels with a normal glass substrate. It features a high contrast ratio, is polarizer-free and has a pixel resolution of 480 x 272.

SMD also is showing 4.82-inch and 12.1-inch transparent, foldable and ID card displays as well.

AM OLED for Mobile

OLEDs have become an important consideration in mobile design as set makers require smarter displays to accommodate multi-functions.

SMD will exhibit a full line up of mobile displays from a 3.2-inch “real” WVGA to a 7-inch WSVGA. The 3.2-inch WVGA on exhibit is the world’s first OLED-Display with 310ppi. (pixels per inch).

Check out also the new Samsung Mobile Display Website about AMOLED.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cheaper Big-Screen OLEDs
5 June 2009



Longer life: DuPont has developed
longer-lasting OLED materials that can be printed
using cheap, simple techniques to make displays
like this one. Credit: DuPont


New organic display materials can be printed with ink-jets.

High-end displays made from organic materials are lightweight, energy efficient, and crisp--but it has proved difficult to manufacture them cheaply and durably.

Now the chemical giant DuPont is reporting the development of long-lasting organic-display materials that can be printed cheaply over large areas, much like ink. DuPont says that these materials can be used to make cheaper high-end displays with existing equipment, and the company says that it is in talks with display manufacturers to bring them to market.

Each pixel in an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) is made up of materials that emit red, green, and blue light in response to electrical stimulation via a thin-film transistor backplane.

OLED displays on the market today are made by depositing organic materials in a vapor through a mask. This setup ensures that differently colored subpixels are properly aligned, but the process is expensive, because some material inevitably gets lost, and difficult to do over large areas. For this reason, OLEDs have so far found their way into only a few products, including a Sony television and some Samsung cell phones.

An alternative approach is solution deposition, which involves printing liquid organic materials onto a surface. Several companies and university research groups have been trying to develop such printable OLED materials, but it's difficult to make light-emitting materials that last long enough to bring them to market: the display quality tends to degrade too quickly.

"If one could get high performance from solution-deposition methods, it would be very attractive: it would solve the scaling issues" associated with making these displays, says Nick Colaneri, director of the Flexible Display Center at Arizona State University, in Tempe. "Now DuPont claims to have solved that problem."

This week at the Society for Information Display (SID) Symposium, in San Antonio, DuPont is presenting OLED materials that can be printed in solution and that make longer-lasting displays. DuPont is disclosing not the composition of the materials or how they are printed. However, the lifetimes of the materials, which the company has disclosed, "are indeed impressive," says Samson Jenekhe, a professor of chemical engineering at the University of Washington, Seattle. For example, the lifetime of the green material involved is more than a million hours, which DuPont says is a record. The efficiency and color purity of the materials, says Jenekhe, are comparable to those of the state-of-the-art organic displays on the market.

Vladimir Bulović, an associate professor of electrical engineering at MIT and a cofounder of QD Vision, a startup company that makes lighting and displays using quantum dots, says, "Since they aim to produce displays, the key will be to understand the deposition and pixelation method they intend to use." DuPont says that the materials are laid down using a high-speed nozzle printer developed with Dainippon Screen, a Kyoto electronics company.

Colaneri adds that, to his knowledge, no solution-printed OLED displays are currently on the market. But other companies are also trying to tackle the problem. Indeed, Sumitomo executives reported at the SID event that they have been shipping solution-printable polymers for displays. Sumitomo also recently acquired U.K. company Cambridge Display Technologies, which makes polymer-based displays. And Universal Display Corporation of Ewing, NJ, is also reporting long-lifetime green display materials at the conference.

William Feehery, global business director of DuPont OLED Displays says that DuPont is currently in discussions with several display companies interested in commercializing its new OLED materials. "They already have the manufacturing infrastructure to make these on glass," he says. The company also plans to look into making flexible displays using the technology.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Corning shows Silicon-On-Glass (SiOG) tech to enable cheaper, larger OLEDs
5 June 2009



Corning SiOG prototype


Corning is showing their latest Silicon-On-Glass (SiOG) technology. SiOG is used to transfer a thin-film of silicon into a display substrate. SiOG is scalable, and currently Corning can make it on a Gen2 substrate, Gen4 by the end of the year.

The SiOG process would permit the fabrication of stable OLED pixel switches with higher yield and much greater performance than LTPS, and on larger substrates. Corning claims that costs will be lower, because this enables manufacturers to integrate the circuitry on the display substrate easily.

Some panel makers are already trying this out, and hopefully we'll see prototype OLED displays based on SiOG by the end of 2009.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Scientists eliminate precise doping limits from the OLED manufacturing process
5 June 2009

Scientists from the RIKEN Advanced Science Institute in Wako have developed a way to eliminate precise doping limits from the OLED manufacturing process. By using a metal dopant containing molecular groups that block the self-quenching interactions, the scientists have, for the first time, fabricated high-efficiency OLEDs with a wide range of doping concentrations.

Hou and colleagues modified a phosphorescent iridium metal complex with a class of molecules known as amidinates. These molecules bind to iridium through a nitrogen atom that localizes electrons near the center of the metal complex. Bulky carbon groups on the edges of the complex are inert and prevent the materials from attaching and self-quenching their phosphorescence.
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post #1101 of 11075 Old 06-06-2009, 01:21 AM
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Wow, nice all positive news containing improvements and announcements.

This is superb stuff for OLED
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post #1102 of 11075 Old 06-06-2009, 03:36 AM
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Wow thanks for the details!. There is more here then most sites that are selling these!
[img]http://www.****************/blog/see.GIF[/img]
Great post
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post #1103 of 11075 Old 06-09-2009, 05:06 PM - Thread Starter
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[SID] LG Display Develops 'OLED Panel Able to Withstand Hammer Strikes'
8 June 2009



The OLED panel was repeatedly
being hit with a mallet, which
made a huge noise in the
demonstration movie.


LG Display Co Ltd of Korea exhibited a 15-inch OLED panel at SID Display Week 2009. To highlight its toughness, the company showed a demonstration video of the panel being hammered with a mallet.

The OLED panel has a thin profile, measuring only 347.94 x 209.80 x 0.85mm. It has 1,366 x RGB x 768 pixels with a resolution of 105 pixels per inch (ppi). The average luminance is 200cd/m2, and the contrast ratio is 100,000:1. The frame frequency is 120Hz.

What surprised visitors most is that the panel was repeatedly being hit with a mallet in the demonstration movie.

"We formed an OLED layer on a glass substrate and provided a steel sheet on its back side and a resin sealing layer on the front, making the panel durable to shock," LG Display said.

However, the panel is not flexible because of the glass substrate, the company said.

The terms "rugged" and "ruggedized," which mean tough or less breakable, were ones of the keywords at this year's SID. They will probably become more familiar words as more and more displays are becoming flexible.
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post #1104 of 11075 Old 06-10-2009, 02:31 PM
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post #1105 of 11075 Old 06-11-2009, 12:49 AM
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Amazing lifetime numbers for green. Acceptable for blue (100% duty time though)

The main problem I see here is that a TV using those materials should be re-calibrated quite often.
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post #1106 of 11075 Old 06-11-2009, 08:14 AM
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post #1107 of 11075 Old 06-11-2009, 11:04 AM
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FICAHsE_enE


That's a great show of OLED strengths. OLED is very suitable for camera applications.
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post #1108 of 11075 Old 06-12-2009, 09:21 AM
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That's a great show of OLED strengths. OLED is very suitable for camera applications.

Ohh! Perhaps the Samsung TL320 will be my first digital camera IF it is capable of taking high "enough" quality pictures!
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post #1109 of 11075 Old 06-12-2009, 02:19 PM
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Truly an eye opener. Thanks for sharing it.

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post #1110 of 11075 Old 06-14-2009, 12:34 AM
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More good news (yummy)
-reliability/durability of certain OLED panels
I could see its potential usage in the near future for outdoor and extreme use (especially in heavy-duty applications such as military and law enforcement)
-lifetime improvements
In the case of the DuPont products, those are indeed convincing finds. Personally though, here's what I think: Green is unbelievable (should last for decades if run at 24/7 non-stop); Red has broken through the 60k threshold (of ideal) HDTV lifespan; Blue seems to be improving (almost there at 38k); Now DuPont is using a Deep Blue (not sure what to say about this Deep Blue thing......but whatever works, then bring it on )

Indeed, superb news in the forefront of OLED technology and it doesn't stop there. Amazing indeed
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Reply OLED Technology and Flat Panels General

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