OLED TVs: Technology Advancements Thread - Page 402 - AVS | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #12031 of 12050 Old 04-24-2015, 11:28 PM
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Originally Posted by irkuck View Post
If LG uses glass sheet size 2200x2500 mm in its M2 OLED plant what might be the biggest size two displays stamped on this glass? Half of the glass sheet is either 2200x1250 mm or 2500x1100 mm but which of these is possible? Both?? Do they stamp four 55 inchers on this sheet?
The M2 fab is a classic 8G fab essentially.

It allows for 6-up production of 55-inch displays because it doesn't require cutting the sheets in half.

A 55-inch display is 1216mm wide, which fits into the width with enough space for edge handling and cutting.

It's 685 mm tall, which fits into a 3-tall format.

What it doesn't do is fit into a half sheet and allow you to make four displays. Period. You would never cut to the 1100 dimension, you'd only get two. Instead, you'd cut the other way and and you'd get three. This is presumably what they'd done with M1, cutting the sheets "early" and getting the same total output.

You can't magically get make displays off of half sheets, however. Basic math should make that clear.

It should similarly be clear that making 65s and 77s is much less efficient. Once you start cutting those sizes out, you get waste that can't be avoided.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working. (Oh, and plasma didn't die because of logistics problems, nor does OLED ship in big boxes because it comes from Korea.)
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post #12032 of 12050 Old 04-25-2015, 03:10 AM
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^Brilliant. My fault I have not expressed clearly what I had in mind. The question was about the biggest size of two displays which would fit onto the LG glass sheet. The size would be then limited by the cut in half, is this the reason why LG is making the 77"?

Another efficient cut for maximizing single display size seems to possible since 6x55" is clearly being done. The cut would be at 2/3 of the height and thus there would be one 110" display and two 55". Glass would be utilized then as in the 6x55" but is such arrangement possible?
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post #12033 of 12050 Old 04-25-2015, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by irkuck View Post
^Brilliant. My fault I have not expressed clearly what I had in mind. The question was about the biggest size of two displays which would fit onto the LG glass sheet. The size would be then limited by the cut in half, is this the reason why LG is making the 77"?

Another efficient cut for maximizing single display size seems to possible since 6x55" is clearly being done. The cut would be at 2/3 of the height and thus there would be one 110" display and two 55". Glass would be utilized then as in the 6x55" but is such arrangement possible?
No way to mix panel sizes on the same sheet.

Both 3 65" and 2 77" utilize about 2/3 of the panel (meaning 1/3 is wasted).

The 77" 2-up is probably based on stacking 2 along the short 2200mm side of the sheet and if the can manufacture with two stacked along the long 2500mm side of the panel, they should at least be able to manufacture 88" TVs.

If there was no overhead (which there is), the long side of the screen would be the full 2200mm side of the sheet and the result would be a 99" TV.

The fact that Sharp is selling 90" LCD TVs is reason to have confidence that 90" OLEDs being manufactured in 2-up configuration will eventually be possible...
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post #12034 of 12050 Old 04-25-2015, 01:31 PM
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I have a Fabrication 401 question.

Are these glass substrates for rigid panels only?

Using Artificial Life algorithms, I created a bunch of creatures and let them evolve on my system. Over the years they gained intelligence, a society, and quite a few interesting abilities. However, using the rules from their world, they concluded that I did not exist. So I created a special creature meant to spread the Word about Me with amazing magical abilities that only He had. Went well, until they decided to nail the poor Guy to a tree.
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post #12035 of 12050 Old 04-25-2015, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by irkuck View Post
^Brilliant. My fault I have not expressed clearly what I had in mind. The question was about the biggest size of two displays which would fit onto the LG glass sheet. The size would be then limited by the cut in half, is this the reason why LG is making the 77"?

Another efficient cut for maximizing single display size seems to possible since 6x55" is clearly being done. The cut would be at 2/3 of the height and thus there would be one 110" display and two 55". Glass would be utilized then as in the 6x55" but is such arrangement possible?
I don't see why it isn't. They don't "pixel pattern" the OLED material so it seems like this could be done. Whether it's efficient/practical is another matter. But technologically, it should be achievable.

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No way to mix panel sizes on the same sheet.
Well, that's not entirely true.
Quote:
Both 3 65" and 2 77" utilize about 2/3 of the panel (meaning 1/3 is wasted).
That, however, is much more true.
Quote:
The 77" 2-up is probably based on stacking 2 along the short 2200mm side of the sheet and if the can manufacture with two stacked along the long 2500mm side of the panel, they should at least be able to manufacture 88" TVs.
The thing is, they can obviously make 110" inch TVs the way irkuck describes. They'd be wasting no more of the sheet than they waste today in the 65s and 77s. And arguably, because the cut actually makes sense, they'd be wasting zero of the sheet, while using the 1/3 they didn't use on a 110" for 2 55s. This sets a theoretical lower bound for the 110 at 4 x 55 plus a yield factor compensator plus a logistic factor compensator plus a "this is a small market" compensator. In short, I actually believe they could someday sell $20,000 110-inch TVs pretty easily if they decide people would buy them.

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I have a Fabrication 401 question.

Are these glass substrates for rigid panels only?
Well, that's trickier to answer. LG has some fascinating "shenanigans" going on that allows them to already make the displays flexible. This involves what is very likely incredibly thin glass on the TVs as the substrate and not plastic, but it seems as though plastic is being used on the smart phones, perhaps a polyimide (which is the direction of the future) with thin-film encapsulation.

Irrespective of that, glass processing is being used by LG today which is then curving the vast majority of the TVs and is planning on launching a TV that will curve and uncurve repeatedly. So, no, glass substrates are not being used for rigid panels only. But LG has talked about how the glass eventually can "leave" the display even if it's used in the creation thereof and then a film-film encapsulation strategy can protect the OLED from air, etc. to preserve longevity.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working. (Oh, and plasma didn't die because of logistics problems, nor does OLED ship in big boxes because it comes from Korea.)
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post #12036 of 12050 Old 04-25-2015, 03:10 PM
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Originally Posted by rogo View Post


Well, that's not entirely true.

The thing is, they can obviously make 110" inch TVs the way irkuck describes. They'd be wasting no more of the sheet than they waste today in the 65s and 77s. And arguably, because the cut actually makes sense, they'd be wasting zero of the sheet, while using the 1/3 they didn't use on a 110" for 2 55s. This sets a theoretical lower bound for the 110 at 4 x 55 plus a yield factor compensator plus a logistic factor compensator plus a "this is a small market" compensator. In short, I actually believe they could someday sell $20,000 110-inch TVs pretty easily if they decide people would buy them.
Yes, the max I commented on of 88-99" was for a 2-up configuration. The maximum size for a 1-up configuration is 110".

And while the theory of manufacturing 1110" and 2 55" OLED YV panels per sheet is enticing, I suspect it is a logistical nightmare. Among other things, LG would probably start by trying to salvage to 1/3 panel leftovers from manufacturing 3 65" or 2 77" OLEDs to start. For the number of 110" OLEDs they might ever produce, the payoff of solving the logistics issues to try to salvage the leftover panel space from manufacturing a single 110" OLED would be far less compelling than solving those issues to salvage the leftovers when manufacturing 3 65" OLEDs.

These exact same 'wasted sheet' issues exist when manufacturing LCDs - are you aware of any manufacturer like sharp that attempts to salvage the leftovers of their LCD sheets by mixing panels of differing sizes on a single sheet?

By the way, on the subject of LCD, I have another question for you - the largest 1-up size for a 2500mm X 2200mm sheet is just under 113" (assuming no overhead at all, which is not realistic).

So how is Vizio making a 120" LCD?

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post #12037 of 12050 Old 04-25-2015, 05:20 PM
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^^^ fix the quote. Who said what?

Using Artificial Life algorithms, I created a bunch of creatures and let them evolve on my system. Over the years they gained intelligence, a society, and quite a few interesting abilities. However, using the rules from their world, they concluded that I did not exist. So I created a special creature meant to spread the Word about Me with amazing magical abilities that only He had. Went well, until they decided to nail the poor Guy to a tree.
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post #12038 of 12050 Old 04-25-2015, 05:40 PM
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^^^ fix the quote. Who said what?
Apologies - fixed...
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post #12039 of 12050 Old 04-26-2015, 01:34 AM
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Originally Posted by rogo View Post


Irrespective of that, glass processing is being used by LG today which is then curving the vast majority of the TVs and is planning on launching a TV that will curve and uncurve repeatedly. So, no, glass substrates are not being used for rigid panels only. But LG has talked about how the glass eventually can "leave" the display even if it's used in the creation thereof and then a film-film encapsulation strategy can protect the OLED from air, etc. to preserve longevity.
Have you any idea of how pigments are treated for production of paint or ink?


And if not it's okay for it is not something that's highly publicized.


Because it is off-topic I am not going to go into gory detail about the aforementioned process. But basically, during the OLED manufacturing process some of the pigment containing oils will have evaporated before the rest of the material solidifies and it's all fine and in good order when you use natural pigments, but when you use pigments which constitute part of a small-molecule OLED which have very little nuturality about them... well, then the vapors coming out of those pigment oils are explosive and only one whiff of contaminated air is enough to poison a dozen of people that's why they can't have these vapors contaminating the air.


Encapsulation has little to do with longevity down the line, but it is very important that oils don't evaporate right after they are deposited.


P.S. These are just inferences based off my experience with the treatment of pigments for fluorescent and phosphorescent materials for LEDs and CCFLs. I am not personally familiar with how LGD does it, but this is what I'd have done in order to avoid explosions and air contamination and prevent pigment evaporation i.e, encapsulation and air-tight production rooms.

....

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post #12040 of 12050 Old 04-26-2015, 06:44 PM
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Fafrd, this isn't LCD. LCD is laid down as pixels on the substrate and to "mix sizes" would be more logistically challenging.

Because the OLED vapor deposition step isn't pixel based, however, it's less of a logistical challenge to deposit the whole sheet, cut, and then make the rest of the magic happen separately. At least in theory.

Practice? I have no idea.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working. (Oh, and plasma didn't die because of logistics problems, nor does OLED ship in big boxes because it comes from Korea.)
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post #12041 of 12050 Old 04-26-2015, 07:03 PM
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Originally Posted by rogo View Post
Fafrd, this isn't LCD. LCD is laid down as pixels on the substrate and to "mix sizes" would be more logistically challenging.

Because the OLED vapor deposition step isn't pixel based, however, it's less of a logistical challenge to deposit the whole sheet, cut, and then make the rest of the magic happen separately. At least in theory.

Practice? I have no idea.
Your saying the color filters are deposited following singulation?

Agree that would make size mixing more practical, but I assumed the entire stack was processed in sheet form and only singulated following completion of all of the processing steps (including color filter).

P.s. Still curious how/where Vizio is manufacturing the 120" panel for the R120 - is there a Gen 9 LCD fab somewhere!??

P.p.s. Found this: http://www.displaysearchblog.com/201...amsung-and-lg/

Sounds like a Gen 10 fab must be getting used to manufacture that 120" panel for Vizio. Either Sharp or possibly Hon Hai if they are in production yet...

P.p.p.s Sounds like it must be Sharp Sakai - found this interesting DARPA presentation on Gen 10 manufacturing: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/sites/defau...PV%20final.pdf

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post #12042 of 12050 Old 04-26-2015, 11:18 PM
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Your saying the color filters are deposited following singulation?
I'm saying it's possible. It's also the case that given a 110" would have the same size pixels as a 1080p 55", well....
Quote:
Agree that would make size mixing more practical, but I assumed the entire stack was processed in sheet form and only singulated following completion of all of the processing steps (including color filter).
So, anyway... I haven't seen the fab or how it does it's magic. But you could have multiple different color-filter layouts. One for all 55s, one for 65s, one for 77s, one for a 110 and 2 55s... I mean lots of things are possible.
[quote]
P.s. Still curious how/where Vizio is manufacturing the 120" panel for the R120 - is there a Gen 9 LCD fab somewhere!??[/quite]

AFAIK, no.
Quote:
P.p.s. Found this: http://www.displaysearchblog.com/201...amsung-and-lg/

Sounds like a Gen 10 fab must be getting used to manufacture that 120" panel for Vizio. Either Sharp or possibly Hon Hai if they are in production yet...
All Hon Hai did was give Sharp some bailout money to help stave off bankruptcy. And Sharp is still bitter that Foxconn didn't agree to buy shares at some dumb price that they are unlikely to ever trade at again. Sharp still wants that price honored for any future investment even though it's like 2x current market. Non-starter much?
Quote:
P.p.p.s Sounds like it must be Sharp Sakai - found this interesting DARPA presentation on Gen 10 manufacturing: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/sites/defau...PV%20final.pdf
Pretty sure that's the only >8G fab running on earth still and perhaps forever using conventional techniques. If we're going to see bigger fabrication, it's likely going to come from some sort of roll-to-roll processing that allows for an 8G (or perhaps a bit more) width and an arbitrary length. If (when?) printable OLED ever becomes real, this becomes an exciting technique though it may prove very difficult to adapt roll-to-roll to Kateeva's nitrogen atmosphere. We'll see.

AVS Forumers continue to wildly overestimate the demand for giant displays. The fact that 8G fabs can easily be adapted to 110" screens means there's a path to larger screens than have ever been sold in any commercial volumes. While I continue to believe the ability to sell said screens for <$10,000 is well within the grasp of existing manufacturing (for LCD, not yet for OLED), I don't believe the demand even at $9999 is especially high. It's clearly far higher than today's demand at many multiples of that. And with OLEDs that are likely to survive the shipping due to flexible substrates, it'll be far more interesting.

Is this a 1 million unit/$10B business someday? We might learn that in 2025 or so.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working. (Oh, and plasma didn't die because of logistics problems, nor does OLED ship in big boxes because it comes from Korea.)
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post #12043 of 12050 Old Yesterday, 04:57 AM
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FWIW, BOE recently received the go ahead for a Gen 10 LCD fab. I have no idea why they think that duplicating Sharp's venture will be a good idea but it is possible that their reasons arent economic in nature. It would seem far cheaper to me to just buy Sharp's capacity than build another fab.

Samsung was supposedly considering a Gen 10 LCD fab until they decided to renew their push back into OLED's.

It seems to me that LG/Samsung have little choice but to push towards OLED's. If OLED's dont succeed, they are likely to get buried under a tsunami of Chinese LCD capacity in a few years.
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post #12044 of 12050 Old Yesterday, 10:48 AM
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FWIW, BOE recently received the go ahead for a Gen 10 LCD fab. I have no idea why they think that duplicating Sharp's venture will be a good idea but it is possible that their reasons arent economic in nature. It would seem far cheaper to me to just buy Sharp's capacity than build another fab.

Samsung was supposedly considering a Gen 10 LCD fab until they decided to renew their push back into OLED's.

It seems to me that LG/Samsung have little choice but to push towards OLED's. If OLED's dont succeed, they are likely to get buried under a tsunami of Chinese LCD capacity in a few years.
When is that new BOE Gen 10 Fab expected to be up and running?

Sharp is probably supplying the vast majority of the worlds demand for 60" and 70" LCD panels right now, and even with at they are unable to make money and are probably underutilizing their fab. With a second Gen 10 fab coming online, there is going to be an absolute glut of 60" and 70" LCDs and this could amount to doom for Sharp.

Maybe it's time for Sharp and LG to start thinking about an alliance to convert Sakai to WOLED production...

LG would quickly round out their OLED product offering with sheet-efficient 60" and 70" OLEDs and Sharp may carve out a small piece of the future for themselves...
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post #12045 of 12050 Old Yesterday, 12:46 PM
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When is that new BOE Gen 10 Fab expected to be up and running?
On April 20, 2015, Chinese panel maker BOE officially announced its investment of CNY 40 billion in the world’s largest TFT LCD fab, a Gen 10.5 with glass substrates sized 3370 × 2940 mm. Mass production is scheduled for late 2017 or early 2018.

According to the announcement, BOE’s Gen 10.5 will mainly produce 60”+, ultra-high resolution, high-end smart TVs, and digital information displays with a design capacity of 90K glass substrates per month. We believe this Gen 10.5 will actually focus on both 43” and 65” products.
http://www.displaysearchblog.com/201...10-5-in-china/

Quote:
Originally Posted by slacker711 View Post
FWIW, BOE recently received the go ahead for a Gen 10 LCD fab. I have no idea why they think that duplicating Sharp's venture will be a good idea but it is possible that their reasons arent economic in nature. It would seem far cheaper to me to just buy Sharp's capacity than build another fab.

Samsung was supposedly considering a Gen 10 LCD fab until they decided to renew their push back into OLED's.

It seems to me that LG/Samsung have little choice but to push towards OLED's. If OLED's dont succeed, they are likely to get buried under a tsunami of Chinese LCD capacity in a few years.
LCD production requires significant labor (much more so than OLED) and wage rates are lower in China than in Japan. Here are some quotes from UBI Research...

any experts who know Korea’s display would recognize that Gen10 LCD line investment is not suitable for Korea. This is because even if Korea expands the market share by investing in Gen10 LCD line they will still be weak against Chinese display companies in price.

An interesting point and perhaps why LG put a lot of focus on China for their initial OLED sets while they worked out production issues...

Korean display companies only sell high quality goods and 90~95% is the limit of yield rate. In comparison, in China the size of the population who can easily purchase expensive high quality TV and the consumers who demands lower priced goods are both huge; faulty display panels have a place in Chinese market. Chinese display companies can also sell lower quality panels through close relationship with lower price TV production companies with factories in China. Theoretically, this can lower the panel price as yield rate close to 100% can be achieved. Furthermore, support from Chinese government and cheap factory construction cost increases price competitiveness of Chinese display companies even more.

Why Samsung must choose OLED TV...

Samsung Elec.’s smart phone business department, IM, is recording twice the amount of revenue of VD business department that produces TV. Therefore that VD department’s marketing method of emphasizing OLED has worse definition than LCD is contradictory since IM department is marketing their product by valuing the superior picture quality of OLED over LCD. If QD-LCD is good then obviously the panel for Galaxy S series also has to be replaced to QD-LCD. Insisting that OLED has better picture quality in smart phone and LCD is superior in TV is mutually incompatible. This kind of dual behavior could result in Samsung Elec.’s rationales to be considered as ones by the boy who cried wolf. For the future expansion of Samsung Elec.’s smart phone market, VD department also has to produce OLED TV and establish the equation of ‘Samsung Elec. = OLED’ in order to complete the business strategy. This is the reason Samsung must undertake OLED TV.

LTPS vs oxide backplane...

Even in TFT production cost, Samsung Display is weaker in comparison to LG Display. LTPS-TFT process used by Samsung Display requires 8~9 mask processes but LG Display is using oxide TFT which needs 4~5. Therefore, it has an advantage of minimizing the investment cost when LCD line is transformed to OLED line. For Samsung Display to transform existing LCD line to OLED line, they have to add a huge amount of capital to the LTPS-TFT production. If they transform the existing 200K LCD factory to OLED line, the capa. also decreases to 90K, but LG Display can maintain the 200K volume without any loss. When OLED is produced transforming the existing LCD line, LG Display does not need additional factory construction but it is calculated that Samsung Display has to build another factory of equal size.

Conclusion...

In conclusion, for Samsung Display to re-enter OLED panel for TV industry, rather than using their existing technology of LTPS-TFT, RGB OLED, and damn & fill encapsulation, it is better to use the technology being used by LG Display such as oxide TFT structure, WRGB OLED structure and lamination method of encapsulation structure that uses adhesive film.

To challenge large area OLED panel industry again, Samsung Display placed the existing large area OLED team under research lab led by their top OLED expert SungChul Kim. Although there has been no official discussion regarding OLED panel production technology directional course, using the same technology as LG Display’s would be advisable in order to succeed.

In terms of resources, Samsung Display, with their many years of OLED panel mass production experience and several thousands of top quality OLED engineers, is superior compared to LG Display.

Only the patents and decision making processes are left.
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post #12046 of 12050 Old Yesterday, 01:15 PM
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On April 20, 2015, Chinese panel maker BOE officially announced its investment of CNY 40 billion in the world’s largest TFT LCD fab, a Gen 10.5 with glass substrates sized 3370 × 2940 mm. Mass production is scheduled for late 2017 or early 2018.

According to the announcement, BOE’s Gen 10.5 will mainly produce 60”+, ultra-high resolution, high-end smart TVs, and digital information displays with a design capacity of 90K glass substrates per month. We believe this Gen 10.5 will actually focus on both 43” and 65” products.
http://www.displaysearchblog.com/201...10-5-in-china/



LCD production requires significant labor (much more so than OLED) and wage rates are lower in China than in Japan. Here are some quotes from UBI Research...

any experts who know Korea’s display would recognize that Gen10 LCD line investment is not suitable for Korea. This is because even if Korea expands the market share by investing in Gen10 LCD line they will still be weak against Chinese display companies in price.

An interesting point and perhaps why LG put a lot of focus on China for their initial OLED sets while they worked out production issues...

Korean display companies only sell high quality goods and 90~95% is the limit of yield rate. In comparison, in China the size of the population who can easily purchase expensive high quality TV and the consumers who demands lower priced goods are both huge; faulty display panels have a place in Chinese market. Chinese display companies can also sell lower quality panels through close relationship with lower price TV production companies with factories in China. Theoretically, this can lower the panel price as yield rate close to 100% can be achieved. Furthermore, support from Chinese government and cheap factory construction cost increases price competitiveness of Chinese display companies even more.

Why Samsung must choose OLED TV...

Samsung Elec.’s smart phone business department, IM, is recording twice the amount of revenue of VD business department that produces TV. Therefore that VD department’s marketing method of emphasizing OLED has worse definition than LCD is contradictory since IM department is marketing their product by valuing the superior picture quality of OLED over LCD. If QD-LCD is good then obviously the panel for Galaxy S series also has to be replaced to QD-LCD. Insisting that OLED has better picture quality in smart phone and LCD is superior in TV is mutually incompatible. This kind of dual behavior could result in Samsung Elec.’s rationales to be considered as ones by the boy who cried wolf. For the future expansion of Samsung Elec.’s smart phone market, VD department also has to produce OLED TV and establish the equation of ‘Samsung Elec. = OLED’ in order to complete the business strategy. This is the reason Samsung must undertake OLED TV.

LTPS vs oxide backplane...

Even in TFT production cost, Samsung Display is weaker in comparison to LG Display. LTPS-TFT process used by Samsung Display requires 8~9 mask processes but LG Display is using oxide TFT which needs 4~5. Therefore, it has an advantage of minimizing the investment cost when LCD line is transformed to OLED line. For Samsung Display to transform existing LCD line to OLED line, they have to add a huge amount of capital to the LTPS-TFT production. If they transform the existing 200K LCD factory to OLED line, the capa. also decreases to 90K, but LG Display can maintain the 200K volume without any loss. When OLED is produced transforming the existing LCD line, LG Display does not need additional factory construction but it is calculated that Samsung Display has to build another factory of equal size.

Conclusion...

In conclusion, for Samsung Display to re-enter OLED panel for TV industry, rather than using their existing technology of LTPS-TFT, RGB OLED, and damn & fill encapsulation, it is better to use the technology being used by LG Display such as oxide TFT structure, WRGB OLED structure and lamination method of encapsulation structure that uses adhesive film.

To challenge large area OLED panel industry again, Samsung Display placed the existing large area OLED team under research lab led by their top OLED expert SungChul Kim. Although there has been no official discussion regarding OLED panel production technology directional course, using the same technology as LG Display’s would be advisable in order to succeed.

In terms of resources, Samsung Display, with their many years of OLED panel mass production experience and several thousands of top quality OLED engineers, is superior compared to LG Display.

Only the patents and decision making processes are left.
Interesting find - thanks.

It is clear that by 2017/2018, Sharp is going to be facing a major degree of hurt, especially since BOE is actually leapfrogging them to Gen 10.5.

Hopefully they are smart enough to figure out that a conversion of Sakia to WOLED production is about their only way out and they are already in discussions with both Korean companies to see who is going to make them a better offer.

It would be suicidal for LG to allow Samsung to team up with Sharp on WOLED, so hopefully they have the foresight to make Sharp an offer they can not refuse...
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The question if LG can produce 2x110" on the glass sheet they use for making 4x55" has direct impact on the perspectives of OLED. 55" OLEDs competing with 55" LCDs is questionable since this market segment has razor-sharp price and profits sensitivity, if there are profits at all there. Profits are in the big size segment and thus there is no other way than grabbing it, jumping over the LCD. 110" LCD were announced but at exorbitant prices and never made to the shops. A 110" 4K OLED would be PQ-wise extremely competitive in the high-end home theater projectors among others and obviously it would be a hot marketing item "OLED dwarfs LCD". The 110" does not have to carry ultrahigh price if made on the same line and the same pixel size as the 55".
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Motion resolution 300 line (4K panel)

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post #12049 of 12050 Unread Today, 09:46 AM
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Originally Posted by irkuck View Post
The question if LG can produce 2x110" on the glass sheet they use for making 4x55" has direct impact on the perspectives of OLED.
I'm guessing that should have been one 110" for four 55".

I'm not sure how much they could determine ahead of time about whether they would get a good 110" display, since one of the four 55" being bad would mean three good ones, but no good 110".

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Interesting find - thanks.

It is clear that by 2017/2018, Sharp is going to be facing a major degree of hurt, especially since BOE is actually leapfrogging them to Gen 10.5.

Hopefully they are smart enough to figure out that a conversion of Sakia to WOLED production is about their only way out and they are already in discussions with both Korean companies to see who is going to make them a better offer.

It would be suicidal for LG to allow Samsung to team up with Sharp on WOLED, so hopefully they have the foresight to make Sharp an offer they can not refuse...
Slightly OT, but I just ran into this: http://www.displaysearchblog.com/201...10-5-in-china/

Seems the Gen 10.5 Fab by BOE is only going to be making IPS LCDs, so Sharp and Sakai have some breathing room and should continue to own/dominate the 60" and 70" VA panel market...

Expect a big price drop in 65" and 75" IPS LED LCD TVs before the end of the decade, however...
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