I am not sure if this is where this question belongs but what the hey? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 2 Old 08-29-2016, 08:01 AM - Thread Starter
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I am not sure if this is where this question belongs but what the hey?

I am trying to figure out how I can record an audio track from a Blu Ray that is being played on my laptop computer. I have no idea where to begin with this project but ultimately what I want to do is record the soundtrack from several films and then convert them to MP3's and ultimately download them into Itunes and then transfer them to my Ipod. Can this be done? I am currently using Windows 10 for the software and I have a Blu Ray Player installed on the laptop. Any advise will be greatly appreciated by this beginning knucklehead. Thanks in advance.
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post #2 of 2 Old 08-29-2016, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by blackiederke View Post
I am trying to figure out how I can record an audio track from a Blu Ray that is being played on my laptop computer. I have no idea where to begin with this project but ultimately what I want to do is record the soundtrack from several films and then convert them to MP3's and ultimately download them into Itunes and then transfer them to my Ipod. Can this be done? I am currently using Windows 10 for the software and I have a Blu Ray Player installed on the laptop. Any advise will be greatly appreciated by this beginning knucklehead. Thanks in advance.
Blackie Derke
Hey there-- yes I think you've come to the right place.

There are two main ways to accomplish this: through software or though hardware.

Software Audio Capture

Software is almost always the preferred method since there are less devices/wires/adapters for a signal to travel through before you capture it. Note that audio capture software (Windows or Mac) can capture audio from your own content and also from anything you play from the internet (including Youtube or Spotify for instance). Remember to not do anything illegal here!

Windows Audio Capture Software

You may already have a utility on your windows computer that can capture audio called "Stereo Mix" (depending on your soundcard). If not, you can download Audacity for free and capture audio that way.

This awesome how-to article takes you through all the possible free ways to accomplish this with software on your Windows computer.

Mac Audio Capture Software

I know you didn't ask about Mac but I actually do a lot of 'recording' on my Mac using something called Soundflower. It allows your soundcard to work as simultaneously an input and an output device so it can record itself. I believe that's the general principle behind Stereo Mix.

The Easiest Software Solution for Starters

IMHO, Audacity is the most user-friendly (and it's free) for people just starting out doing this since it is both a capture softare and a DAW (digital audio workstation) all in one. After you capture your tunes from the soundtrack or part of a film, you might want further control to crop clips and Audacity makes that pretty easy and intuitive. Being free software, it's not the most aesthetically pleasing user interface, but I think it is really useful and it gets the job done.

If you are pretty advanced and already have a DAW that you like, using something like Stereo Mix on Windows or Soundflower for Mac is better since it will record tracks straight into your favorite DAW.


Hardware Solutions


There are a number of cheap (and expensive) audio hardware capture devices out there. There are a lot of times when you'd rather have the hardware since you are trying to record something that doesn't exist on your computer (or in a high-quality form online).

Least Expensive Hardware Solution Type

Typically audio quality is more a function of the audio source (e.g. record player, tape deck, CD player, etc) than the capture device, but both matter. So if you're going the cheap route, you will have to try some of these devices and see for yourself if you think the quality is good. You'll also notice that all adapters in this price range also capture composite video (what we affectionately remember as the yellow RCA plug). These bring both analog audio and video into your computer via USB. It's difficult to find a unit with a lot of reviews that is better than 3.5 star average on Amazon because people typically have expectations that don't match the possible quality these things can kick out.

More Expensive Hardware Solution

For those who are serious about audio capture, I recommend Zoom recorders. They have both dynamic microphone capture abilities as well as direct line-in recording from any device. Zoom is a long-standing audio professional's favorite, and the audio quality for capture or via built-in mic recording is outstanding. I carry one with me whenever I do anything out of the ordinary (like going to the zoo in recent history) in case there's an interesting sound I want to capture.

Hope that helps, hit me back if you need any more clarification and happy audio hunting!

Connect Anything at Sewell Direct

Also, check out our dedicated AVS subforum here.

Last edited by Sewell Direct Jared; 08-29-2016 at 09:25 AM.
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