record uverse to dvd discs - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 5 Old 01-08-2010, 08:09 AM - Thread Starter
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how do i record what i have saved in the att uverse Motorola vip 1216 to a dvd disk?
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post #2 of 5 Old 01-08-2010, 08:29 AM
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U-Verse does not allow downloads or offloads from their box. You'll need to buy a standalone DVD recorder or a PC capture card to record the composite, s-video, or component output from the box.
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post #3 of 5 Old 01-08-2010, 08:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cucui View Post

how do i record what i have saved in the att uverse Motorola vip 1216 to a dvd disk?

Several ways that I can think of.

1. Connect the VIP1216 to a stand-alone DVD-Recorder. Press play on the VIP and record on the DVD-recorder.

2. Does the VIP have Firewire? If so, import your recordings onto your Mac or PC. Use software to convert the video to MPEG-2 (if necessary) for burning onto a DVD. Toast does this on Macs. Not sure about Windows. If the video is HD, then you could burn as a BD-5/9 disc (see #4 below).

3. Use a dedicated device for taking analog video to a Mac/PC. Here's an example for a Mac product. I'm sure Windows has these kinds of devices as well. Then burn to DVD with the proper software.

3a. Use a miniDV camcorder as a DV bridge to get the footage onto a Mac/PC. Then burn to DVD with the proper software.

4. If you're interested in HD material, you can use the Hauppauge HD-PVR 1212 to import the component outputs of the VIP. The imported video will be in h264 format. On a Mac, you can use the latest Toast to burn a BD-5/9 disc that will play on a BluRay player. (note - a BD-5/9 is a standard DVD that is burned so that it will play HD video on a BluRay player. It will not play on a DVD player)

I'm not familiar with the VIP, but some fancier DVRs can connect to a computer network and will allow for videos to be downloaded to a Mac/PC. Tivos allow this. If the VIP can do this and there aren't huge DRM issues to overcome, this would be the easiest/cheapest way to go.

I'm sure there are tons of other ways to do this, but I can't think of them right now.
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post #4 of 5 Old 01-08-2010, 12:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ftaok View Post

Several ways that I can think of.

1. Connect the VIP1216 to a stand-alone DVD-Recorder. Press play on the VIP and record on the DVD-recorder.

2. Does the VIP have Firewire? If so, import your recordings onto your Mac or PC. Use software to convert the video to MPEG-2 (if necessary) for burning onto a DVD. Toast does this on Macs. Not sure about Windows. If the video is HD, then you could burn as a BD-5/9 disc (see #4 below).

3. Use a dedicated device for taking analog video to a Mac/PC. Here's an example for a Mac product. I'm sure Windows has these kinds of devices as well. Then burn to DVD with the proper software.

3a. Use a miniDV camcorder as a DV bridge to get the footage onto a Mac/PC. Then burn to DVD with the proper software.

4. If you're interested in HD material, you can use the Hauppauge HD-PVR 1212 to import the component outputs of the VIP. The imported video will be in h264 format. On a Mac, you can use the latest Toast to burn a BD-5/9 disc that will play on a BluRay player. (note - a BD-5/9 is a standard DVD that is burned so that it will play HD video on a BluRay player. It will not play on a DVD player)

I'm not familiar with the VIP, but some fancier DVRs can connect to a computer network and will allow for videos to be downloaded to a Mac/PC. Tivos allow this. If the VIP can do this and there aren't huge DRM issues to overcome, this would be the easiest/cheapest way to go.

I'm sure there are tons of other ways to do this, but I can't think of them right now.

The Motorola VIP DVRs are IPTV DVRs for AT&T's U-verse IPTV service (not a cable DVR), AT&T does use DRM protection on their recordings, so the Motorola VIP1216 is very limited on what it can do

Options 1, 3, 3a, and possibly 4 may work, the Motorola VIP1216 does not have a Firewire port and the USB ports are disabled

In order to record something from the Motorola VIP1216, you need to use a video output that is not affected by DRM, this can be Coax, Composite (Yellow), S-Video (Mini DIN connector), and possibly component (Red, Green, Blue) (I have seen component devices with copy protection, so your mileage may vary), HDMI is known for it's DRM protection compatibility, so that is definitely out of the question

Your best bet is to use either Coax, Composite, or S-Video to a computer or standalone DVD recorder (a standalone DVD recorder is preferred, most standalone DVD recorders are set up like a VCR, so they are pretty easy to record with), or using component to a computer or standalone Blu-Ray/BD-5/9 recorder (if there are standalone Blu-Ray or BD-5/9 recorders, not sure, but I bet one would exist by now)

If you use a standalone recorder, it should burn directly to disc in real time, so it should save time, if you are using a computer, you will have multiple steps, and possibly multiple programs (there are some programs that are all-in-one, I can not think of any off the top of my head though), so the process is a little more controlled, but will take longer
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post #5 of 5 Old 01-08-2010, 01:16 PM
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If looking at the DVDR option check out this AVS forum. A tunerless Panasonic EA-18 would give you the best picture quality over 2hrs/DVD up to about 3hrs. At 4hrs macroblocking becomes an issue for fast action scenes. The Magnavox 2160a is also a favorite due to it's HDD which makes editing much easier. Personally I'd try and not go over 2hrs/DVD with the Magnavox.
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