HDTV Recording - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 03-18-2013, 06:19 PM - Thread Starter
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Greeting everyone,

I'm sorry if this has already been asked and perhaps answered as well. Let's suppose that there is a HD television program that is copy protection free, and I want to get this program onto my pc/mac for editing and then finally onto a DVD disc while retaining as high of a resolution as possible. What are my options from start to finish ranked in order of total price to complete.

Sincerely grateful,
Rob
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post #2 of 11 Old 03-19-2013, 06:39 AM
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This is the wrong forum for that subject.
Too many legal beagle, straight arrows here. wink.gif

Abundant OTA television is what makes this country different from all others. Lets keep it this way.
The Internet is no place for streaming video.
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post #3 of 11 Old 03-19-2013, 08:40 AM
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Since your desired end product is a std def (SD) DVD, one option would be to copy the HD recording to a Magnavox MDR533's HDD ($230), edit on the Mag (if nothing "fancy" is desired), then high-speed dub (HSD) to DVD.

 

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post #4 of 11 Old 03-19-2013, 09:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turpy View Post

Let's suppose that there is a HD television program that is copy protection free, and I want to get this program onto my pc/mac for editing
OTA or cable.

- kelson h

The bitterness of poor quality lasts long after the sweetness of the low price is forgotten . . . life is too short to drink bad wine

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post #5 of 11 Old 03-19-2013, 09:51 AM
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OTA is copy protection free isn't it? wink.gif

Abundant OTA television is what makes this country different from all others. Lets keep it this way.
The Internet is no place for streaming video.
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post #6 of 11 Old 03-19-2013, 12:17 PM
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Quote:
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OTA is copy protection free isn't it? wink.gif
Yes

- kelson h

The bitterness of poor quality lasts long after the sweetness of the low price is forgotten . . . life is too short to drink bad wine

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post #7 of 11 Old 03-19-2013, 04:09 PM
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Since we have no idea where you are starting from -- i.e. what equipment is in play already -- it is impossible to answer your question other than to speculate. So here goes -- if you are starting from scratch, a very inexpensive way is to buy a Silicon Dust HD Homerun network tuner box. If you are OTA you get the HDHR-3 (dual tuner, ATSC, $70). If you are cable you get the HDHR Prime (3-tuner, cable card, $160) and rent a cable card. You then hook it to your network and use your PC (Win-7 WMC) to record the HDTV broadcast directly to your PC's HDD as the original HD/5.1 transport stream -- that's all it takes. You can do whatever you want to with the video file afterwards.

- kelson h

The bitterness of poor quality lasts long after the sweetness of the low price is forgotten . . . life is too short to drink bad wine

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post #8 of 11 Old 03-19-2013, 08:04 PM - Thread Starter
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Wow, that sounds very reasonable to accomplish. To be quite honest, I want to record some made for tv movies and sports programming (all of which are not offered what-so-ever on DVD), so copy protected or not I simply disagree with being prevented from capturing them. I do have an OTA antenna, but I mainly watch Comcast cable. I have one HD-DVR in the living room and an RCA set-top dvd recorder that I was trying to use, but it only supports S-video and composite inputs which end up looking worse that an old VCR tape!! That might also be that the recorder is crappy or simply made to record at alow resolution. At it's highest setting, it will record one (1) single hour of video on a single layer DVD. When I mentioned editing, nothing fancy at all, simply trimming and commercial removal.

Surely I can get this done with some simply/easy digital to analog method which I can obtain and use relatively inexpensively.

Thank you all for the advice.

Rob
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post #9 of 11 Old 03-19-2013, 08:55 PM
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Record it on your HD-DVR then transfer the recording in HD using the HD-DVR component out (if it has one) to a computer via a hauppage hd pvr 1212 on clearance a BB for 139.
From the computer you can either burn to disc AVCHD and play in a bluray player or play the raw file via a media player (or some bluray players).
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post #10 of 11 Old 03-19-2013, 09:45 PM
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One piece of information that would help us to guide you is knowing whether your priority is compatibility (having these DVDs play back on any DVD player), quality (getting the best picture and sound from your recordings) or space (fitting as many episodes on a disc as possible), because there are some tradeoffs between ease-of-use, recording quality, and space. How easy, expensive, and time consuming this is depends on your priorities.

The major downside of copying the video with component outputs is that it has to happen in real time, i.e. you have to play back the entire file while you record it. Some loss of quality also occurs from decompressing and recompressing the video (transcoding), too. If you use an OTA DVR like the TViX 6620:

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1195962/official-dvico-tvix-m6620n-hd-atsc-qam-tuner-topic

you can transfer the original MPEG-2 TS directly to your computer over your network (or using a USB HDD). If you recorded a 480i channel, you could convert the MPEG TS to PS format, put it inside a VOB container, and burn it to DVD without any quality loss and with the benefit of having a standard video DVD that would play in any DVD player.

If you want to preserve HD quality, you would need to either burn the episodes to BD-R (since DVD-R doesn't have enough space to hold more than an episode or two of MPEG-2 video in HD) or transcode the videos to a more efficient format, such as MPEG-4. Recompressing the video to H.264 would let you fit several HD episodes on a DVD, but either way you would need either a computer or a Blu-ray player to view the files on the disc, because a standard DVD player wouldn't understand MPEG-2 video in HD or understand MPEG-4 video at all, regardless of its resolution.
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post #11 of 11 Old 03-20-2013, 06:56 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleron Ives View Post

One piece of information that would help us to guide you is knowing whether your priority is compatibility (having these DVDs play back on any DVD player), quality (getting the best picture and sound from your recordings) or space (fitting as many episodes on a disc as possible), because there are some tradeoffs between ease-of-use, recording quality, and space. How easy, expensive, and time consuming this is depends on your priorities.

Understood - I rate them thusly: 1) quality 2) total cost 3) storage requirements 4) playback compatibility

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleron Ives View Post

The major downside of copying the video with component outputs is that it has to happen in real time, i.e. you have to play back the entire file while you record it. Some loss of quality also occurs from decompressing and recompressing the video (transcoding), too.

Agreed, my RCA set top recorder only has composite (one yellow, not component) and s-video inputs. While these both are unaffected by copy protection, there are also what I consider to be very poor quality. Besides, my recent research has led me to believe that this DVD recorder is simply not designed to create an end result of higher quality than a standard VHS tape.

Thanks to Kelson's recommendations, I believe that the HD Homerun Prime will do exactly what I need at a phenomenally affordable price!

Again, thanks to everyone. I came to get great advice and that is exactly what I got!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleron Ives View Post

If you use an OTA DVR like the TViX 6620:

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1195962/official-dvico-tvix-m6620n-hd-atsc-qam-tuner-topic

you can transfer the original MPEG-2 TS directly to your computer over your network (or using a USB HDD). If you recorded a 480i channel, you could convert the MPEG TS to PS format, put it inside a VOB container, and burn it to DVD without any quality loss and with the benefit of having a standard video DVD that would play in any DVD player.

If you want to preserve HD quality, you would need to either burn the episodes to BD-R (since DVD-R doesn't have enough space to hold more than an episode or two of MPEG-2 video in HD) or transcode the videos to a more efficient format, such as MPEG-4. Recompressing the video to H.264 would let you fit several HD episodes on a DVD, but either way you would need either a computer or a Blu-ray player to view the files on the disc, because a standard DVD player wouldn't understand MPEG-2 video in HD or understand MPEG-4 video at all, regardless of its resolution.

Also, GREAT advice that will no doubt help me reach my goal with the highest possible quality! By the way, I have Blu-Ray players in all rooms and I am going to store these videos on mass storage and stream them via media player boxes also in each room.
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