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post #1 of 11 Old 12-14-2015, 08:40 PM - Thread Starter
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Question HD Recorder

What is best way to record from HD cable box?
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post #2 of 11 Old 12-15-2015, 10:34 AM
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Several choices depending on what you're trying to accomplish.

If your cable box has a working fire wire port, it may be possible to transfer recordings using it. That would allow a direct digital copy. Or you could buy a D-VHS tape deck and use that method.

If it doesn't, you're probably looking at a solution using the component out connectors feeding into an HD analog capture device such as the Hauppauge HD PVR. That will do an analog-digital conversion that will be somewhat degraded compared to the original, but still excellent quality.

If this is something you want to do going forward, there's also options such as building a Media Center PC with a networked CableCard tuner. That would allow you to have the HD recording already on a PC and could be edited, burned to DVD or Blu-Ray, etc. That's provided the content is from a channel flagged as copy-freely. If it's copy-once, you'd still have the recording saved but couldn't edit or transfer it.

Or you could get a Tivo, which also allows moving recordings over to a PC with the same stipulations as above. Much easier to set up and use than a PC.
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post #3 of 11 Old 12-15-2015, 06:00 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by JDLIVE View Post
Several choices depending on what you're trying to accomplish.

If your cable box has a working fire wire port, it may be possible to transfer recordings using it. That would allow a direct digital copy. Or you could buy a D-VHS tape deck and use that method.

If it doesn't, you're probably looking at a solution using the component out connectors feeding into an HD analog capture device such as the Hauppauge HD PVR. That will do an analog-digital conversion that will be somewhat degraded compared to the original, but still excellent quality.

If this is something you want to do going forward, there's also options such as building a Media Center PC with a networked CableCard tuner. That would allow you to have the HD recording already on a PC and could be edited, burned to DVD or Blu-Ray, etc. That's provided the content is from a channel flagged as copy-freely. If it's copy-once, you'd still have the recording saved but couldn't edit or transfer it.

Or you could get a Tivo, which also allows moving recordings over to a PC with the same stipulations as above. Much easier to set up and use than a PC.
I was looking at the Hauppauge PVR. So you record into that and then can you dump that into a computer?
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post #4 of 11 Old 12-15-2015, 06:05 PM - Thread Starter
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Hauppauge PVR

I was looking at the Hauppauge PVR. So you record into that and then can you dump that into a computer?

Does anyone make a DVD Blu Ray recorder? Not a computer Blu Ray recorder.
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post #5 of 11 Old 12-16-2015, 06:45 AM
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I was looking at the Hauppauge PVR. So you record into that and then can you dump that into a computer?
Actually you record directly from the Hauppauge to the computer's HDD and from there you can manipulate it if you like and burn it to the computers BD burner.
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Does anyone make a DVD Blu Ray recorder? Not a computer Blu Ray recorder.
Unfortunately not No such thing as a standalone BD burner that will record from line inputs(aside from a couple older JVC professional models that only recorded from specific JVC cameras) and they were priced in the $1000s, they had no standard HD inputs.
No, to record to BD in the US one must use a PC
Europe did sell several standalone Panasonic BDRs but none had line inputs, the only way to record HD was from their HD tuners, which are incompatible with our TV system.
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post #6 of 11 Old 12-16-2015, 07:17 AM
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I was looking at the Hauppauge PVR. So you record into that and then can you dump that into a computer?

Does anyone make a DVD Blu Ray recorder? Not a computer Blu Ray recorder.
The Hauppauge PVR is an analog capture device the plugs into the USB port of your PC and runs a capture app on the PC. The box takes in the analog HD signal from the component outputs of the source, then encodes using MPEG-2 or H.264 according to the profile you select. It also takes the digital AC3 audio signal from the sources optical output. the AV streams are muxed together into the selected container format and written to your HDD.

If the container is .m2ts or MKV, you can burn these files directly to BD-R on your PC with ImgBurn and they will play in any BD player made in the last 5 yr. You will most likely want to edit the commercials from the recording, in which case Video ReDo is the program of choice -- it is written for exactly this purpose. It is frame accurate and can save in a wide range of container formats.

A stand-alone recorder would require component inputs for HD video, optical inputs for AC3 audio (DD 5.1) and a BD burner. There are no stand-alone consumer recorders in the US with any of those requirements. Furthermore, component outputs are part of the so-called "analog hole" which is being closed as you read this. The digital HDMI output was designed to prevent direct digital copying of the source.

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post #7 of 11 Old 12-16-2015, 11:39 AM
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The Hauppauge PVR is an analog capture device the plugs into the USB port of your PC and runs a capture app on the PC. The box takes in the analog HD signal from the component outputs of the source, then encodes using MPEG-2 or H.264 according to the profile you select. It also takes the digital AC3 audio signal from the sources optical output. the AV streams are muxed together into the selected container format and written to your HDD.

If the container is .m2ts or MKV, you can burn these files directly to BD-R on your PC with ImgBurn and they will play in any BD player made in the last 5 yr. You will most likely want to edit the commercials from the recording, in which case Video ReDo is the program of choice -- it is written for exactly this purpose. It is frame accurate and can save in a wide range of container formats.

A stand-alone recorder would require component inputs for HD video, optical inputs for AC3 audio (DD 5.1) and a BD burner. There are no stand-alone consumer recorders in the US with any of those requirements. Furthermore, component outputs are part of the so-called "analog hole" which is being closed as you read this. The digital HDMI output was designed to prevent direct digital copying of the source.
The Hauppauge DVR can record directly from the HDMI output, with the correct set up. Do a site search and you will find out how.

Cheers
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post #8 of 11 Old 12-16-2015, 12:22 PM
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The Hauppauge DVR can record directly from the HDMI output, with the correct set up. Do a site search and you will find out how.

Cheers
Not if the source is HDCP protected. That's the purpose of HDMI.

The HDMI input on the Hauppauge is for unprotected content -- i.e. hooking it up to your Playstation to record your gaming session. HDMI outputs of DVR's, Disk players, STB's, etc. are all HDCP protected.

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post #9 of 11 Old 12-16-2015, 12:30 PM
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Not if the source is HDCP protected. That's the purpose of HDMI.

The HDMI input on the Hauppauge is for unprotected content -- i.e. hooking it up to your Playstation to record your gaming session. HDMI outputs of DVR's, Disk players, STB's, etc. are all HDCP protected.
The reason I qualified my statement is that there are several , inexpensive ways to get around this. Enough said. Just look it up. (Amazon.com)

Cheers

Last edited by Ralarcon; 12-16-2015 at 12:34 PM.
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post #10 of 11 Old 12-16-2015, 03:12 PM
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The reason I qualified my statement is that there are several , inexpensive ways to get around this. Enough said. Just look it up. (Amazon.com)

Cheers
If you are referring to HDMI splitters that remove HDCP, that is a hole that is being plugged with the newer models. If you are referring to something else, you provide the link.

- kelson h

The bitterness of poor quality lasts long after the sweetness of the low price is forgotten . . . life is too short to drink bad wine

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post #11 of 11 Old 12-17-2015, 08:53 PM
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What is best way to record from HD cable box?
I presume what you really want to do is have a copy of some HDTV Cable programs. Use a tuner with a CableCard (HDHomeRun Prime is a good one) and a Windows 7 PC (Windows Media Center). I see no point in recording the output of a cable box when you can easily capture the stream directly.
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