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post #1291 of 1347 Old 05-29-2014, 06:45 AM
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I was conviced that "intemporal" existed in English vocabulary, but it doesn't after all, silly me. That means you guys recognise a bit of Portuguese or Spanish language. smile.gif Anyway, "intemporal" in that particular sentence sounds odd to me, so I'm glad I changed it. By "inwitting" you are referring to another word I used in my review or to a different English word? If it's the last case, then I'm totally lost... I know the word"unwitting" and I used it according to its literal meaning - unconscious or unintentional or by accident. Anglo-saxon revival? Lol, I'm not going that far. tongue.gif
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post #1292 of 1347 Old 05-29-2014, 06:53 AM - Thread Starter
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By "inwitting" you are referring to another word I used in my review or to a different English word?

No, it was just an example of a coinage people will understand even though it is not in the dictionary. Wit = mind, inwitting = self reflective mind or conscience.

I thought James Joyce used that (he generated much gibberish) but maybe it is my own contribution.

-Bill
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post #1293 of 1347 Old 05-29-2014, 07:13 AM
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Ah, I see what you mean. That's a nice coinage right there, maybe I'll use it in the future. biggrin.gif
I think I noticed some coinage in Samuel Beckett works as well, probably the reason of the common What the Hell?? moments he provided me with. James Joyce happens to be one of the English language writers I'm most interest in, still haven't read anything from him.
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post #1294 of 1347 Old 06-03-2014, 03:50 AM - Thread Starter
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The Song of Bernadette (1943), directed by Henry King.

In 1858, at Lourdes, France, a peasant girl experiences a series of visitations from a presence she calls "The Lady", but which everyone else understands to be the Virgin Mary. She develops a small following among the poor, but is opposed by both Church and State and is threatened with the insane asylum.

Then the miracles begin.

It's a lovely presentation of the story, matter of fact in tone and realistic in clothes and settings. A bit long at 2 1/2 hours; they could have cut some of the politics. And those miracles: all might have natural explanations.

Fine characterizations by the actors, particularly:

  • "Introducing" luminous Jennifer Jones, a perfect combination of youth and innocence with sadness, far-seeing wisdom and spiritual pain.
  • Vincent Price as the bitter, sarcastic prosecutor.
  • Lee J. Cobb as the doctor, skeptical but knowing the limits of rationality.
  • The always unsmiling Charles Bickford, a strict priest who is first an enemy, but then an ally.
  • Gladys Cooper as a cruel nun who persecutes Bernadette, realizing the depth of her envious sin only at the end.

Famous Alfred Newman score.

Available on Blu-ray from Twilight Time. The image is sometimes quite good -- those stone and wood textures -- but the source quality is variable, with some print damage. The commentary track is edited together from three somewhat gushy film scholars: a theologian, a Jennifer Jones biographer, and an Alfred Newman fan.



-Bill
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post #1295 of 1347 Old 06-05-2014, 06:01 AM - Thread Starter
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Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines (1965), directed by Ken Annakin.

...or How I Flew from London to Paris in 25 hours 11 minutes.

This slapstick retro-adventure comedy was a laugh riot when new. A bit less so now, if still nostalgically entertaining. It seems leisurely paced by today's standards.

Much comedy of national characteristics: buffoonish Germans in spiked helmets, love-happy French who taunt the Germans, easy-going but studly American cowboys, Japanese who create their first airplane overnight just to enter the race, etc.

Terry-Thomas is always welcome as an oily villain, and we get Benny Hill and Red Skelton in small doses (just as well).

Many process shots and studio stunt-work, but they also have impressive full-size flying replicas. It makes you think: those few years when airplanes were first invented, you could build your own and be among the first to explore the empire of the air above the rural countryside. That must have been a blast.

The fictional air-race is supposed to be in 1910, 55 years before the film was made. We're now at 49 years since the film, one of those history time-warp calculations that make me queasy to contemplate.

Twilight Time Blu-ray with a rather good image. 2.20 aspect ratio. A commentary track by the director gives many production details.



-Bill
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post #1296 of 1347 Old 06-05-2014, 01:34 PM
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The Mirror (1975) - 9

Hauntingly hermetic movie. Several plots and historical archives entangled in a jigsaw puzzle. All the events appear to revolve around one object whose identity is unclear. Maybe it's the prominent woman, or maybe the man whose voice interacts with the woman and other characters throughout the film. Dialogues point to personal and familial ordeals of the seemingly main character couple. The desultory narrative is fascinating, but what truly haunts me is the visual experience. This aspect is particularly noteworthy; as if Tarkovsky intended to lure the viewers with sheer contrasts and movements of striking imagery intertwined in fluid disorder. The picture is highly poetic; quality imparted by the wonderful cinematography (both color and B&W) and sensible camera work. The sound design, with excellent music, enhances the visual cunning. The cinematic experience is a multifaceted treasure; a narrative puzzle infused in a scenic sculpture that occasionally recalls to video art. There are nostalgic scenes, inspiring scenes, impenetrable scenes, and even scenes that evoke the cinematic styles of Bergman and Antonioni. Postmodern cinema in all its splendor. The only drawback, in my opinion, are the rare moments when Tarkovsky seems so impressed with his own artifice that he drags it into a redundancy skimming the ludicrous. Although minimal, these overboard moments inconveniently carry my attention towards the artificiality of the work, distracting as a result. If not for these immersion glitches, I would certainly rate The Mirror a perfect 10. Yet another masterpiece that lures me to a waking dream. So far, Tarkovsky's films have caused me a deep impression, and The Mirror is no exception; it's an amazing experience that keeps haunting me days after. I love it and I think every cinephile should give it a try!
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post #1297 of 1347 Old 06-09-2014, 03:42 AM
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Yojimbo (1961) - 8,5
Already covered by Bill here.

1860, Japan. A small city divided by the ferocious rivalry between two criminal gangs that fight for its control. The arrival of a ronin (a lordless samurai) sets forward a new order of events. Obscure reasons propel the warrior to join the conflict; a seemingly reckless decision that is soon offset by his astuteness and deathly ability with the sword. The nameless man, nicely played by Toshiro Mifune, makes marionettes of both parties of the rivalry in a machination set forward by himself. Power manipulation, swindles and righteous bravery in the face of setbacks culminate in the extinction of both gangs and the final resumption of peace in the city. The hero departs after his duty is fulfilled. Yojimbo is considered a major influence for the following western cinema; this probably explains the déjà vu feeling I experienced at the end of the film - I felt as if I had watched a western where the only thing missing was Clint Eastwood playing the lone wolf. I will say, however, that Yojimbo satisfies me in ways that no spaghetti western has ever matched. A lone vigilante who arrives to clean the city corrupted by criminals; the classic plot is polished to near perfection in this film. Raw and appealing aesthetics, rich and well-acted characters, perfect transitions between comedy, drama, action and suspense as we follow the lone samurai crafting his web. It becomes a natural reaction to sympathize with the hero, and, in the end, I am fully satisfied by the entertaining cinematic experience itself and by the culmination of the events. Moreover, this is another great cinematic example of perfect symbiosis between form and substance; a feat only within reach of great masters like Akira Kurosawa. This is masterful and very well-rounded filmmaking. Fun, thrilling and ultimately awe-inspiring, Yojimbo is excellent entertainment with no distractions. Great movie, highly recommended!
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post #1298 of 1347 Old 06-09-2014, 07:37 AM
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Bill, I happened to watch "Those Magnificent Men...." a few weeks ago. I remembered it very fondly from my youth and had not seen it since I saw it in the movies.

Unfortunately, I have to say that it's so dated I gave the BD away. I could never watch it again. It looks great, and the flying scenes with real aircraft just aren't done that way any more, but the plot and characters are all such cliche's it's not worth it.

SMK
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post #1299 of 1347 Old 06-09-2014, 08:42 AM
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I use torrents to download most movies.

You do realize how despicable that is, don't you?

See the link in my signature? This is a link to the 1900 movies I've bought. I believe in paying for people's work, and not stealing it.
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post #1300 of 1347 Old 06-09-2014, 10:40 AM - Thread Starter
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Double Indemnity (1944), directed by Billy Wilder.
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I wonder if she's still lying alone up there in that house or if they've found her by now. I wonder a lot of things. They don't matter any more.

Reviewed recently by kkl10 here.

Bit by bit, the essential classics become available on Blu-ray.

Notes after the first Blu-ray viewing:

  • Written by Wilder and Raymond Chandler, from a James M. Cain novel. I hear a lot of Chandler in the witty bits of dialogue, but also in the evocation of hot and dusty LA, the historical layers of architecture, newish but already seeming old
  • An insider might attempt the perfect crime: do a murder, get the woman and the money. ("I didn't get the woman and I didn't get the money"). As always we wonder how it will go wrong. What did they miss?
  • Did their greed for the double payoff sink them? Would they have made it otherwise?
  • A possible criticism is that although Walter is driven by his lust for Phyllis, we get only one scene that hints as to consumation of their passion. This is no doubt due to the Production Code: the story was sordid enough already. But the hands-off policy serves a useful purpose: note that Walter's passion flags when he decides to become a killer. He's more interested in outsmarting the insurance company than in bedding Phyllis. His romantic obsession evaporates in the face of his fear: first of being caught, and in the end the fear of her.
  • At the last moment her eyes go wide when she feels the pistol. It's a well-known joke but at that moment it's not.
  • Barbara Stanwyck can do it all. Here the whole package of cheap wig, tight sweater and ankle bracelet make us believe. That glint in her eye when she's going to kill someone.
  • Apart from that Phyllis is rather opaque. We're never really sure how much she planned or what she always intended. The story from her point of view might be interesting, but it would mean nailing down much of what is unknown.
  • By contrast, Walter's guilt and fear is obvious to us, although invisible to the other characters. He shows almost supernatural dread. Fred MacMurray, mostly a light comic actor, is remarkably fine here.
  • All the other possible male leads turned it down.
  • Edward G. Robinson's Barton Keyes is one of my favorite characters in movies. He's said to be doing a Billy Wilder impression.
  • As close as he and Neff are, note that he doesn't go all drippy at the end. He's a pal, but not a chump. Walter has broken his heart, but that doesn't mean he gets away with murder.
  • The scene where the car won't start after the murder: it was added at the last minute. Wilder's car wouldn't start and he ran in from the parking lot: "Don't strike the car set yet!"
  • It's set in 1938, already the mythical pre-war past.
  • Hitchcock loved it.

Miklos Rozsa score, both lyrical and doom-laden.

Available on Blu-ray with these extras:

  • Two commentary tracks: the usual relaxed musings of Richard Schickel, and a conversation between Nick Redman and writer Lem Dobbs, who are also watching the film but might as well not be.
  • A documentary: Shadows of Suspense.
  • The 1973 made for TV version, using a reduced edit of the original screenplay. A pointless, passionless effort, in color and brightly lit. Wags on the IMDB ask "Where's Columbo?" It has that look. Nice standard def image, though, from a 35mm original.



-Bill
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post #1301 of 1347 Old 06-09-2014, 11:42 AM
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lovely movie... I need that in my collection

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post #1302 of 1347 Old 06-10-2014, 07:41 AM
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I wonder if she's still lying alone up there in that house or if they've found her by now. I wonder a lot of things. They don't matter any more.


That quote is very much Raymond Chandler and very reminiscent of the end of "The Big Sleep." ....."You were dead, you were sleeping the big sleep, you were not bothered by things like that."

SMK
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post #1303 of 1347 Old 06-10-2014, 08:17 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by RoyGBiv View Post

Quote:
I wonder if she's still lying alone up there in that house or if they've found her by now. I wonder a lot of things. They don't matter any more.


That quote is very much Raymond Chandler and very reminiscent of the end of "The Big Sleep." ....."You were dead, you were sleeping the big sleep, you were not bothered by things like that."

SMK

Not really relevant to this story, but my favorite Chandler quote is from Little Sister. Marlowe is getting unwanted calls from a prospective client. Imagine young Mattie from True Grit. He hangs up on her but says: "I should have locked the door and hid under the desk."

Marlowe has something like a break down in that story, with hallucinations.

-Bill
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post #1304 of 1347 Old 06-10-2014, 09:34 AM
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In my estimation Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett were the archetypes of noir fiction. There are many present day noir fiction writers who I admire, like Michael Connelly and Dennis Lehane, but Chandler and Hammett's work is still the standard by which all noir should be judged.
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post #1305 of 1347 Old 06-10-2014, 09:58 AM
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In my estimation Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett were the archetypes of noir fiction. There are many present day noir fiction writers who I admire, like Michael Connelly and Dennis Lehane, but Chandler and Hammett's work is still the standard by which all noir should be judged.
I'll second that! Have you read Spade and Archer by Joe Gores? Written as a prequel to Maltese Falcon, in a near pitch-perfect emulation of Hammett.
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post #1306 of 1347 Old 06-10-2014, 12:27 PM
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I'll second that! Have you read Spade and Archer by Joe Gores? Written as a prequel to Maltese Falcon, in a near pitch-perfect emulation of Hammett.

I have indeed read Joe Gores Spade and Archer and thought it was a hoot. Not to be missed by any Hammett fan, or Sam Spade fan for that matter. smile.gif
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post #1307 of 1347 Old 06-12-2014, 06:40 AM
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While I love Raymond Chandler's writing, I don't think his plots always made a lot of sense. Unfortunately, that often translated into the movie versions being hard to follow or not making sense at all. There have been some interesting versions of his books, but my favorite by far is "Farewell, My Lovely," with Robert Mitchum. I think Mitchum is a great Marlowe, and what I particularly like about the movie is how much of the dialog and Mitchum's narration come directly from Chandler's words.

SMK
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post #1308 of 1347 Old 06-12-2014, 09:56 AM
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While I love Raymond Chandler's writing, I don't think his plots always made a lot of sense. Unfortunately, that often translated into the movie versions being hard to follow or not making sense at all. There have been some interesting versions of his books, but my favorite by far is "Farewell, My Lovely," with Robert Mitchum. I think Mitchum is a great Marlowe, and what I particularly like about the movie is how much of the dialog and Mitchum's narration come directly from Chandler's words.
I seem to recall either Hammett or Chandler confessing that parts of his plots didn't make sense to him either.

Last edited by gwsat; 06-14-2014 at 07:21 PM.
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post #1309 of 1347 Old 06-15-2014, 05:08 AM - Thread Starter
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The Mephisto Waltz (1971), directed by Paul Wendkos.

A variation on Rosemary's Baby, where this time the satanists are after the husband instead of the wife. She figures it out and puts up a fight, even when it means bargaining with the devil.

It has some effective moments but is not a great entry in the genre: we get it, the satanists are putting their minds into stolen younger bodies. Could we move this along a bit faster? I have a hard time taking Alan Alda seriously in anything. The ending makes no sense: her husband is gone, why does she want to be in a new body with his body? Unless she is playing a long revenge game?

I review it only to pay homage to the talent and startling beauty of Jacqueline Bisset. Both she and Barbara Parkins have brief flashes of nudity, daring for proper actresses in 1971.

Jerry Goldsmith score.

Produced by Quinn Martin, his only feature film. He did a vast amount of television back then.



-Bill
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post #1310 of 1347 Old 06-17-2014, 01:50 PM - Thread Starter
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The Third Man (1949), produced and directed by Carol Reed.

Reviewed recently by kkl10 here.

As an off-kilter, darkly comic political thriller, there is really nothing to match this. Bold filmmaking with the tilted camera angles, untranslated dialogue and wild zither score, clueing us that we are in a strange place.

Our hero, hapless Holly Martins as played by Joseph Cotton, is something of a dope. He thinks of himself as being in one of his pulp western novels. He blunders into a tangled web of crime and politics and expects to get his way with blustering demands. He meets his dead friend's girl at the funeral and figures he had better fall in love with her. When frustrated he mopes and drinks. He knows Harry has been an operator from an early age (would he be a "player" these days?) but can't conceive that his friend has become a criminal.

It's funny except when it's not. Holly causes some deaths and the prospect of seeing Anna deported East is wrenching.

I can't avoid a political interpretation: the common belief among educated Englishmen like Graham Greene is that Britain must play the wily Greek to America's strong but naive and somewhat dim Roman. The wise men of the Old World provide the geopolitical cunning, the New World supplies the money and muscle. Churchill: "You can rely on America to do the right thing after having exhausted all other possibilities."

Which is what Holly finally does in the end: the right thing.

Of course, there is another type of uncalculating loyalty besides the blundering of an innocent abroad: the woman who loves Harry won't betray him, no matter what he has done.

I noticed many little things this time, for example:
  • Holly obliviously walking under the ladder.
  • The porter pointing down for Heaven and up for Hell.
  • The "baron" stepping into the gutter to avoid the policeman.
  • Anna sleeping in Harry's pajamas -- they have his initials.
  • Anna: "Comedy. I don't play tragedy."

Great cast. From this and The Paradine Case, Alida Valli owns the dark mysterious woman roles. The way she is used as a bargaining chip in the game of crime and politics: it breaks our hearts. You can tell that Callaway, hardened as he is, doesn't like doing it.

I also love tough but pleasant Sgt Paine, played by Bernard Lee, later "M" in the early James Bond films.

Orson Welles is, of course, the quick, affable but amoral spider at the center of the web. He has only few minutes on screen but it is his best role. They had a terrible time getting him to show up for filming.

You couldn't have this film without the ruin of post-war Vienna. Some of it is shot on sets, but they couldn't have been constructed without an intimate knowledge of the actual city. Rubble looks alarmingly lovely in black-and-white movies: the texture and shadows.

The score is a single instrument: that crazed, jangling zither. It would be a different film without it. I'm astonished the studio allowed it.

Finally: Do we presume that one of the black marketeers was murdered so that Harry could disappear? What was the "job" Harry offered Holly? (...thinking...) Did it involve becoming a corpse? That's a dark thought.

Early Criterion Blu-ray, long out of print and expensive on the used market. Netflix still lists it, and after months of "Very Long Wait" in the #1 slot in my queue, I got it. I was expecting something scratched and about to be withdrawn, but it was a pristine copy.

Studio Canal also has this on Blu-ray, but the image is said to be not as good. See the DVDBeaver comparison.

Detail is mostly good; the black levels fluctuate in spots.

Many extras, including two enthusiastic audio commentaries: (1) directors Steven Soderbergh and Tony Gilroy admiring the filmmaking craft, and (2) a more academic film scholar. He finds many quotes of other films and even self-references to the making of the film itself. Like a lot of lit-crit people he can find endless correspondences.

Soderbergh's comment on the final scene: "Each time I see it I expect her to at least look at him when passing by. But no: she always just walks on."



-Bill
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post #1311 of 1347 Old 06-17-2014, 07:28 PM
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The Third Man (1949), produced and directed by Carol Reed.


-Bill
A jewel of a review, Bill! Really, a masterpiece. As usual, despite the volumes written about this great movie, you point out some central truths that downright demand another viewing and a fresh look.

Thank you.

Last edited by hitchfan; 06-17-2014 at 07:31 PM.
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post #1312 of 1347 Old 06-18-2014, 06:39 AM
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The Third Man (1949), produced and directed by Carol Reed.

-Bill
Great review. Great eye for details.
Makes me want to watch it again; there is so much to like but I couldn't ever tune into it.
I definitely think this would be a different experience without that zither score.
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post #1313 of 1347 Old 06-18-2014, 08:00 AM
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Great review. Great eye for details.
Makes me want to watch it again; there is so much to like but I couldn't ever tune into it.
I definitely think this would be a different experience without that zither score.
I remember your review saying you couldn't quite get into it. For fans of it like me, I get hooked within the first 15 seconds of Trevor Howard's opening narration and cannot tune out from that point onward because it is so fast, cynical, offhand yet brutal, sad yet funny...

If I had a quibble about The Third Man at all, I'd have to say my attention lags more toward the end rather than the beginning or middle. I'm not talking about that final famous scene with Alida Valli walking down the pathway, but the "action" scene where Harry Lime is finally cornered. The sewer setting is certainly appropriate but, I don't know, I always wanted something more memorable in that part of the movie than a rather conventional shoot 'em up, bang-bang and all. Not sure what. The handling of everything prior to and after that sequence is so imaginative and unconventional (the camera angles, the dialogue, the tone, and that music again!), I kind of wish the demise of one of moviedom's iconic villains had involved something more striking, more bizarre. Perhaps give sociopath Lime a moment to do or say something particularly cruel (or pathetic?) before getting it.

Maybe I am unjustifiably wishing director Carol Reed had channeled some inner "Hitchcock" for that one sequence and put a bit more of an imaginative spin on it. Otherwise, to my mind, The Third Man is a nearly flawless and un-improvable masterpiece before and after that sequence.
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post #1314 of 1347 Old 06-18-2014, 08:34 AM - Thread Starter
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I kind of wish the demise of one of moviedom's iconic villains had involved something more striking, more bizarre. Perhaps give sociopath Lime a moment to do or say something particularly cruel (or pathetic?) before getting it.
My thought when watching it this time was that the purpose of the sewer shootout was mainly to feature the graphics of the scene. That the plot had broken loose into action/thriller mode was just the excuse.

How to finish Harry Lime? He's wounded and trapped. He looks at Holly, gives him the slightest nod, we cut away and hear the shot. Harry was "put down" in a mercy killing by his old friend, probably the only person he would allow to do it. Somehow that made it acceptable. (Again I wonder: had Harry planned the same fate for Holly?)

Is that the end of Holly's innocence? Watching him wait for Anna at the cemetery: I would guess not.

-Bill
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post #1315 of 1347 Old 06-18-2014, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by wmcclain View Post
How to finish Harry Lime? He's wounded and trapped. He looks at Holly, gives him the slightest nod, we cut away and hear the shot. Harry was "put down" in a mercy killing by his old friend, probably the only person he would allow to do it. Somehow that made it acceptable. (Again I wonder: had Harry planned the same fate for Holly?)

-Bill
Good one. As long as he was trapped and wounded badly enough, we couldn't unavoidably conclude Holly had delivered the coup de grace in order to win Anna rather than due to a more noble sense of justice.
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post #1316 of 1347 Old 06-20-2014, 02:13 PM
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Apocalypse Now Redux (1979) - 8

From the eve of a secret mission to the confines of enlightening horror. Willard chronicles the journey and the personal implications of what he faces until the echo of his words is muffled by the atrophied voice of a man who has allied with horror and moral terror by his own means to the detriment of a hypocrite army. The atrocious madness of warfare, dissected in a beautiful, spectacular and surreal cinematic feast. This movie looks surprisingly modern for a product of 1979. Modern in the best and the worst. I say the worst because it abounds with redundant moments that distract me. I wanted to nurture higher appreciation for this movie, but there is too much that, in my opinion, is not essential for the cinematic experience; some cuts would help to forge a more consolidated and distinctive work. The excesses are all the more frustrating by means of the typical hollywood-esque pathos so prominent that, sometimes, this movie looks like an exercise in ostentatious vulgarity without substance or appeal so common in nowadays' Hollywood junk food. This is a 1979 movie so it's difficult to pass fair judgement about its originality, but the fact is several scenes are insipid, seemingly pointless and slightly confuse me about the real message that the movie is trying to convey. I suspect that my nagging stems from the additional 49 minutes of runtime in the Redux version. I read about the added scenes and, not surprisingly, a large part of them match with what I consider surplus. I actually enjoy the leisurely, almost wandering, pace of the Redux version; it compels to thorough contemplation and reflection about everything there is to see and interpret. But the shifting pace enhances qualities and limitations in equal measure. I, therefore, agree with some of the criticism received by this version; I think this is a corruption, by excess, of a masterpiece (or so I hope). What is not essential, is excess; the essential of this movie is formidable; then it follows that I lust for the original version. I would love to see it in a big theater to experience all the visceral and haunting juice this movie has to offer.

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post #1317 of 1347 Old 06-21-2014, 08:23 PM
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Apocalypse Now Redux (1979) - 8

From the eve of a secret mission to the confines of enlightening horror. Willard chronicles the journey and the personal implications of what he faces until the echo of his words is muffled by the atrophied voice of a man who has allied with horror and moral terror by his own means to the detriment of a hypocrite army. The atrocious madness of warfare, dissected in a beautiful, spectacular and surreal cinematic feast. This movie looks surprisingly modern for a product of 1979. Modern in the best and the worst. I say the worst because it abounds with redundant moments that distract me. I wanted to nurture higher appreciation for this movie, but there is too much that, in my opinion, is not essential for the cinematic experience; some cuts would help to forge a more consolidated and distinctive work. The excesses are all the more frustrating by means of the typical hollywood-esque pathos so prominent that, sometimes, this movie looks like an exercise in ostentatious vulgarity without substance or appeal so common in nowadays' Hollywood junk food. This is a 1979 movie so it's difficult to pass fair judgement about its originality, but the fact is several scenes are insipid, seemingly pointless and slightly confuse me about the real message that the movie is trying to convey. I suspect that my nagging stems from the additional 49 minutes of runtime in the Redux version. I read about the added scenes and, not surprisingly, a large part of them match with what I consider surplus. I actually enjoy the leisurely, almost wandering, pace of the Redux version; it compels to thorough contemplation and reflection about everything there is to see and interpret. But the shifting pace enhances qualities and limitations in equal measure. I, therefore, agree with some of the criticism received by this version; I think this is a corruption, by excess, of a masterpiece (or so I hope). What is not essential, is excess; the essential of this movie is formidable; then it follows that I lust for the original version. I would love to see it in a big theater to experience all the visceral and haunting juice this movie has to offer.

Didn't your DVD include a copy of the original? The Blu-ray version is THE one to buy if your really want to see these films in the best possible version available for home consumption. It includes the original cut, the Redux version AND the marvelous documentary Hearts of Darkness.


Seriously...if you consider yourself a cinephile, why aren't you buying the latest versions of these masterworks on Blu-ray?


Or did you just download this one like you admitted you have with all (or most) the movies you've watched for your other reviews?
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post #1318 of 1347 Old 06-22-2014, 06:03 AM
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It includes the original cut, the Redux version AND the marvelous documentary Hearts of Darkness.
I remember spending good money after finally tracking down a VHS tape of Hearts of Darkness. This movie is one of my top 5 movies of all time and I have mixed feelings about Redux. I love the added scenes because it gives me more of the movie to see and chronicles more of their journey up river. But, watching the theatrical version doesn't seem empty or lacking without the extra scenes.

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Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work. -- Thomas Alva Edison
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post #1319 of 1347 Old 06-22-2014, 08:27 AM
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I remember spending good money after finally tracking down a VHS tape of Hearts of Darkness. This movie is one of my top 5 movies of all time and I have mixed feelings about Redux. I love the added scenes because it gives me more of the movie to see and chronicles more of their journey up river. But, watching the theatrical version doesn't seem empty or lacking without the extra scenes.

larry

I treat Redux as an extra feature, like a deleted scene composite. The added scenes are interesting but entirely unnecessary. I'm glad to be able to have seen them, but when I sit back to re-watch Apocalypse, I always go for the theatrical version.


...and Hearts of Darkness is surely among the best documentaries ever made, right up there with Les Blank's film Burden of Dreams, about the making of Werner Herzog's Fitzcarraldo.

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post #1320 of 1347 Old 06-22-2014, 08:36 AM
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Quote:Originally Posted by kkl10

I use torrents to download most movies.

BTW, kkl10, notice that even though you deleted your post saying that you "use torrents to download most movies", I quoted you in a previous post (as you can see above) where you openly say that you do, so you can't deny it. You may have deleted your post, but you can't delete the post I made.


As far as I'm concerned, if you haven't spent the money to buy these films, I have absolutely no interest whatsoever in hearing what you think of them. Obviously, you don't think much of them at all since you don't have the decency to actually give money to the people who made them.


Check out the link in my signature. See that list of 1900 films? I BOUGHT all of those.

Last edited by Kilgore; 06-22-2014 at 08:40 AM.
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