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post #1921 of 1939 Old 07-27-2017, 06:17 AM - Thread Starter
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Third Man on the Mountain (1959), directed by Ken Annakin.

I'm still catching up with the Disney family-friendly adventures I missed when I was a child.

Filmed on location, this is a fictional account of the first ascent of the Matterhorn, here called "the Citadel" for some reason. It takes place during the Golden age of alpinism; I never heard the term before looking it up. It was a glorious 11 years when many of the Alps were first climbed.

Young James MacArthur wants to be a climbing guide like his father, who died on the big mountain. No one believes in him except a visiting Englishman who is the world's greatest mountaineer (Michael Rennie), a washed-up guide and general rascal (Laurence Naismith), and most importantly, his girl (Janet Munro) who can put on trousers and scale cliffs as well. She sparkles here.

Others in the cast: James Donald as the sour uncle and Herbert Lom as a fierce guide from a competing village.

Some spectacular mountaineering footage by the pro doubles: free climbing on vertical walls, rope navigation of impossible-looking overhangs, and vertiginous perspectives. The actors get to do some real roped locations themselves and it does not look like easy work. A few process shots but many more real ones.

I'm actually glad I didn't see this when young; I might have had nightmares. I'm not afraid of heights only because I never go there.

In those days adventure books were for young people who wanted to be doing things. In the film when they get to a high point and look around at the surrounding peaks, the English climber says "This is here every day and millions of people will never see it" and the viewer would think "yes, I want to be there".

Score by William Alwyn.

The DVD is not very good. According to the IMDB 1.37:1 is the correct aspect ratio, which is unusual for a theatrical release in the late 1950s. Maybe the film was always intended to go to TV, or perhaps the cameras and lenses needed for the location climbing were not suited for widescreen?



-Bill
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post #1922 of 1939 Old 07-27-2017, 06:19 AM - Thread Starter
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The Day the Earth Caught Fire (1961), written, produced and directed by Val Guest.

A reporter's life was falling apart anyway when wouldn't you know it: atomic testing sends the Earth spiraling toward the Sun. Ignore the bad science: this is an adult tale of heat death at the end of the world, an allegory of love and loss in the atomic age.

Finally losing patience waiting for an announced Blu-ray from Cohen Media, I bought the well-reviewed region B disc from BFI.

Notes:

  • The presentation of the working newsroom has been described as the best since The Front Page (1931).
  • I am most grateful for the subtitles on the new disc. The reporters are full of quips and the journalism patter flew by me too quickly on the old DVD.
  • The Daily Express is a real newspaper. The publisher cooperated, allowed them to recreate the newsroom at the studio and also stage scenes down in the plant.
  • The reporter's pub across the street was also a real location.
  • Arthur Christiansen, recently retired as editor of the Express, more or less plays himself here.
  • It's not just the realism of the newspaper: the beaches and amusement parks are a vivid picture of the time.
  • Edward Judd, our bitter hard-drinking protagonist, becomes tedious after a while. He is slowly redeemed by the love of a good woman and the realization that at the end of the world, priorities need to be reordered.
  • Janet Munro gets an adult role she wanted. At Disney (Third Man on the Mountain (1959), Darby O'Gill and the Little People (1959), Swiss Family Robinson (1960)) they used to bind her breasts down to make her look younger. Here she has a brief flash of nudity and sleeps naked under a sheet. She thanked the director for letting her mature.
  • Leo McKern is just great as the science reporter with an acid wit who can also be a good friend.
  • During the breakdown of society we have a "kids gone wild" segment typical of the era. They seem more like beatnik performance artists than actual looters, but if you knock one down an elevator shaft the others go away.
  • Uncredited Michael Caine has a few lines as a traffic policeman. In his biography he says the director berated him for having no talent and said he had no future as an actor.
  • On the commentary track the director has a shout-out for Caine but doesn't tell that story.
  • The anti-bomb message is underlined by footage of a Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament march.
  • On the commentary the director also takes credit for fortuitous anticipation of global warming.

Available on region B Blu-ray from BFI. Now with subtitles. The commentary track -- a conversation with the director -- is brought forward from the DVD.

This is a fine upgrade over the DVD video. The disc includes a booklet and a rich set of extras, including three short atomic bomb films.



-Bill
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post #1923 of 1939 Old 07-27-2017, 02:11 PM
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Originally Posted by wmcclain View Post
The Crawling Eye (1958), directed by Quentin Lawrence.

I have read that this was the first movie lampooned by Mystery Science Theater 3000.
The original MST3K crew was in fine form when they lampooned The Crawling Eye. And the film was superb fodder for them.

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post #1924 of 1939 Old 08-01-2017, 02:12 PM - Thread Starter
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Sergeant York (1941), directed by Howard Hawks.

A hell-raising sharpshooting country boy reforms when struck by love and lightning, just in time to be drafted into the First World War. Initially claiming conscientious objector status, he meditates and decides he can participate. During a battle in the Argonne, according to his Medal of Honor citation:

Quote:

After his platoon had suffered heavy casualties and 3 other non-commissioned officers had become casualties, Cpl. York assumed command. Fearlessly leading 7 men, he charged with great daring a machine-gun nest which was pouring deadly and incessant fire upon his platoon. In this heroic feat the machine-gun nest was taken, together with 4 officers and 128 men and several guns.
He did this with a bolt-action rifle and a sidearm. It's not clear to me how many enemy soldiers he shot in that action, but by all accounts it was a bunch. Over 20?

This is not the usual Hawks picture and is not a favorite among his fans, although it was wildly successful at the time. It is a reverential look at an American hero stressing historical accuracy, made when York and many others were still alive and gave their permission to be portrayed.

The most serious deviation from history: York did not get religion after lighting struck him and blew up his rifle. It was a long effort by his wife. York said a bolt of lightning was the closest the screenwriters could come to describing the experience.

Gary Cooper is a good fit for York, both men tall and lean, both hard-working country boys; Cooper grew up on a Montana cattle ranch. He was 10 years older than York as shown in the film.

Many familiar faces. Walter Brennan was born to play old men. Joan Leslie moved to Warner and hit it big this year, also featured in High Sierra (1941). She was 16.

Most of the Tennessee scenes are on soundstages with painted backgrounds. When he gets to training camp and France, encountering the modern world for the first time, it opens up into outdoor locations.

This was in the theaters when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and young men left the show and went directly to the enlistment offices. The circumstances are peculiar: before December 7 1941 the country was isolationist and the producers were called before the Senate and accused of making pro-war propaganda. After that date everything changed and Hollywood became part of the war effort.

The image of the sharpshooting citizen-soldier is embedded in American mythology. And how many films deal with the struggle of conscience on whether to go to war or not?

For more background see Sergeant York (film) and Alvin York.

Max Steiner score.

Available on DVD with a detailed commentary track.



-Bill

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post #1925 of 1939 Old 08-01-2017, 02:13 PM - Thread Starter
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Air Force (1943), directed by Howard Hawks.

A squadron of B-17s flying from California to Hawaii arrive in the middle of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Lacking armaments, all they can do is scatter and hide at remote airfields. They are directed onwards, deeper into the War, first with a brief stopover with the doomed Marine garrison on Wake Island, then to the Philippines for desperate fighting and repair work.

This would be a good companion to They Were Expendable (1945), set at the same time, also in the Philippines. It is a similar story of frantic scrounging for parts and fighting superior forces during those early months when the US was losing the Pacific war. Howard Hawks and John Ford were alike in some ways and you can see it in their films. Hawks is somewhat constrained by the patriotic needs of the movie, but his storytelling talent always comes through.

The realism starts strong in this one, drifting into wartime action entertainment in the second half. It's what audiences wanted: Japanese soldiers mowed down, an improbable number of their fighter planes exploded by bomber machine gunners, and mass carnage on their invasion fleet heading for Australia. It's action packed but not as far out as something like Raoul Walsh's Desperate Journey (1942), also from Warner.

Wartime entertainment always has some stock characters: Harry Carey as the old army Crew Chief, John Garfield as the malcontent who gets an attitude adjustment. A cute bit with a dog. Everyone speaks in baseball metaphors.

Other familiar faces: Gig Young, Arthur Kennedy, Charles Drake. George Tobias plays the same character as in Hawks' Sergeant York (1941), the proud but friendly New Yorker. John Ridgely is the young squadron captain; I had to look up his name but remember seeing his face during this era, notably as Eddie Mars in The Big Sleep (1946).

Quite a lot of model work but also good aviation photography.

The wikipedia article has a section on historical accuracy. The film has local Japanese snipers and saboteurs in Hawaii. Nothing like that actually happened. Did the filmmakers know it wasn't true at the time? Maybe not, fog of war and truth being the first casualty, etc.

Photographed by James Wong Howe with a Franz Waxman score.

Available on DVD. It includes a 20 minute Technicolor short: Women at War (1943) about WAC training at Fort Des Moines, Iowa.



-Bill

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post #1926 of 1939 Old 08-01-2017, 07:58 PM
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Sergeant York (1941), directed by Howard Hawks.

...This was in the theaters when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and young men left the show and went directly to the enlistment offices. The circumstances are peculiar: before December 7 1941 the country was isolationist and the producers were called before the Senate and accused of making pro-war propaganda. After that date everything changed and Hollywood became part of the war effort.

-Bill
It is rarely mentioned that in the famous first appearance of Superman in Action Comics #1 , June 1938, our All-American Super Hero sets about to thwart the efforts of an evil Washington D.C. lobbyist and Senator bent on passing war-related legislation with their villainous goal being that, "our country will be embroiled with Europe".

Action Comics #1 , page 11:
http://www.reading-room.net/Action1/Action1P11.html
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post #1927 of 1939 Old 08-04-2017, 12:30 PM - Thread Starter
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The Seventh Victim (1943), produced by Val Lewton, directed by Mark Robson.

When her big sister goes missing and her tuition is not being paid, a young woman is ejected from her boarding school. She could come back and work, but a kindly member of the staff says: "I did that when I was young. Never come back here".

So it is off to forbidding New York City to find the vanished sister. She gets hints and ominous intimations of secrets and warnings to stop looking. The mysteries all seem "female" and the authority figures male. She finally locates an apartment her sister rented but never used. Behind the locked door: a chair and hangman's noose.

Finally she is told her sister became involved with a secret cult of devil worshipers and now they are after her.

This has great ambiance with Roy Webb's lovely score and Nicholas Musuraca's inspired shadowed photography. As a story you have to meet it halfway. At only 70 minutes long it can only hint at some plot points, and some love triangles confuse us. We have a detection and romance middle of the movie, when what we really want to know is what are the satanists up to?

The cultists seem like normal, if upscale and intense, people. They claim to be pacifists except when dealing with traitors, when they aren't. Hints of lesbianism. Else, I'm not sure what choosing evil instead of good means to them.

The wikipedia article has details on cuts made; the scholar on the DVD commentary track think those were probably worth cutting.

He describes the whole tone as "bleak" and "nihilistic" but I think the romance subplots muddle that. The wayward sister becomes a moral object lesson: apparently a thrill seeker she finally went too far and now must pay the price.

Tom Conway is the non-quite-reputable psychiatrist Dr. Louis Judd, the same character he played in Cat People (1942), where he died at the end.

A typical episode in the career of producer Val Lewton: he and director Jacques Tourneur had become a productive team but RKO split them up figuring they could make twice as money with them on different projects. Lewton chose Mark Robson, who had edited his previous three films, to be first time director on this one. RKO: we're willing to give you "A" pictures in the future but you can't pick such an inexperienced director. Lewton: I'll stick with "B" pictures and use the directors I want. And he was very happy with Robson's work.

Available on DVD with an enthusiastic and helpful commentary track.

He says one of the writers researched by visiting a group of devil-worshipers in New York: old people knitting and casting curses at Hitler. Again, I'm befuddled by the whole concept.



-Bill

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post #1928 of 1939 Old 08-08-2017, 07:16 AM - Thread Starter
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Elevator to the Gallows (1958), directed by Louis Malle.

(For Jeanne Moreau, 1928–2017)

The perfect murder: arranged by the lovers to kill the husband, an influential arms dealer. The murderer is an ex-commando and can handle himself, so what can go wrong? Well, during his getaway the elevator could lose power and a young joyriding couple could steal his car and commit crimes using his name.

When he doesn't make the rendezvous, haunted-eyed Jeanne Moreau wanders the rainy streets like a tightly wrapped madwomen, seeking the lover she suspects has betrayed her.

The director's first feature film, this is a dandy little crime thriller. It combines the elements of "what else can go wrong?" and "will they get away with it?" with that very French stylish yet bleak look at modernity.

As with Frankenheimer's The Train (1964) I am fascinated with the physical details they were willing to put into films in that era: automobile controls and engines, cameras and darkroom procedures. Today it's push-button computer magic, all just made up.

Great views of Paris cars and streets and the highways and motels in the country.

Score written and performed by Miles Davis. Quoting the wikipedia:

Quote:

The film's score is considered by many as groundbreaking. The score by Miles Davis has been described by jazz critic Phil Johnson as, "The loneliest trumpet sound you will ever hear, and the model for sad-core music ever since. Hear it and weep".
Available on Criterion DVD.



-Bill

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post #1929 of 1939 Old 08-08-2017, 07:52 AM - Thread Starter
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The Wonderful Country (1959), directed by Robert Parrish.

An American has been hiding out in Mexico so long he speaks English with an accent. Sent north of the border to buy guns for his patron he is laid up with a broken leg and finds himself between worlds, caught between north and south, the yankee and the spanish, the law and the outlaws.

This is a strangely paced, unconventionally structured western. Not successful at the time, it is better liked since but I think it will still be unsatisfying to many. Robert Mitchum is a character who can't win, scarcely in control of his fate. It's a good performance.

When the cavalry major's wife (Julie London, last seen in The Red House (1947)) flirts with him he is honest with her, pleading to be let off the hook. He has a chance for a fresh start and doesn't want to ruin it. That goes over poorly.

I don't think I've seen it before: the local cavalry unit are black troops. Their sergeant is baseball player Satchel Paige in one of his only two film roles.

Tough guy Charles McGraw is a friendly saw-bones.

Alex North score.

Available on Blu-ray from Kino. The Technicolor needs restoration.



-Bill

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post #1930 of 1939 Old 08-08-2017, 07:53 AM - Thread Starter
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The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970), produced and directed by Sam Peckinpah.

Left to die in the desert by his "friends", after several thirsty days Cable Hogue makes a deal with God -- promptly forgetting it -- and "finds water where it wasn't". His primitive springs lie just next to the stagecoach road and he develops it into a going concern with his own hands, and -- although he doesn't seem to realize it -- with the help of others.

He has two interests apart from his new business: (1) that pretty hooker in town, and (2) meeting those "friends" again.

This may be the closest Peckinpah has ever come to a sex comedy. Although only lightly erotic, the humor is the sort that men like. Most of all it is a romance. He is so famous for violent pictures like The Wild Bunch (1969) and Straw Dogs (1971) that we forget his softer side, as with this one and Junior Bonner (1972).

Not that it is totally soft: Hogue's treatment of his "friends" when they do come around again is wickedly brutal. He shows mercy to one but not the other. Is that repentance? He has a long journey and becomes a different person by the time he pays the debt of life. Maybe it was part of the deal.

Fun cast:

  • Jason Robards is great as an illiterate sand-encrusted desert rat. He cleans up nicely and actually seems to get younger as he prospers and falls in love. May that's just because of inconsistent coloring of his beard.
  • Stella Stevens is the buxom pixie prostitute with a heart of gold. She had been a Playboy centerfold model: 5'5", 37-22-40 says the wikipedia.
  • David Warner is a flexible clergyman ministering to lonely women. He takes over the movie in some scenes.
  • The great Peckinpah regulars Strother Martin and L.Q. Jones are the low-life friends.
  • Slim Pickens is the colorful stagecoach driver.
  • Others: R.G. Armstrong, Gene Evans and James Anderson.

Jerry Goldsmith score, his only work with the director. Photographed by Lucian Ballard, who had to work around torrential rains in a dry desert movie.

Available on Blu-ray from Warner Archive. On a commentary brought forward from the DVD, Nick Redman hosts three Peckinpah historians. They say:

  • His warmest as well as most under-seen and underappreciated film.
  • His most biblically-themed story.
  • His most theatrical, actually seeming Shakespearean in outline.
  • A story of America, the good and bad of settlement and development.
  • It parallels the story of Peckinpah's family.
  • L.Q. Jones wanted to acquire the script for his own project, but wound up performing in this film.



-Bill

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post #1931 of 1939 Old 08-08-2017, 08:17 AM
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The Wonderful Country (1959), directed by Robert Parrish.

An American has been hiding out in Mexico so long he speaks English with an accent. Sent north of the border to buy guns for his patron he is laid up with a broken leg and finds himself between worlds, caught between north and south, the yankee and the spanish, the law and the outlaws.

This is a strangely paced, unconventionally structured western. Not successful at the time, it is better liked since but I think it will still be unsatisfying to many. Robert Mitchum is a character who can't win, scarcely in control of his fate. It's a good performance.
This was a Mitchum production, his second producer credit. Supposedly it was a condition of his accepting the role.
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post #1932 of 1939 Old 08-08-2017, 01:21 PM
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Elevator to the Gallows (1958)[/size][/url], directed by Louis Malle.

(For Jeanne Moreau, 1928–2017)
Bill -- Thanks to your review, I found and listened to quite a bit of the Miles Davis score for
. I became a fan of "cool jazz" beginning with Dave Brubeck in the early '50s, so Davis' wonderful music and performance for this film were in my wheelhouse. Thanks for the tip!
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post #1933 of 1939 Old 08-11-2017, 11:13 AM - Thread Starter
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A Taste of Honey (1961), produced and directed by Tony Richardson.

Young Jo and her irresponsible fun-loving mother flit around run-down industrial Manchester, moving whenever the rent comes due. Mom gets a younger boyfriend just about the time Jo finds her own first love with a black sailor. He's nice but won't be around for long. They have one night together before he ships out.

When Mom remarries Jo has to find her own place. She takes in a young gay man who becomes her best friend. He loves her and when learning she is pregnant, offers to marry her for the sake of the baby. Then Mom reenters the story.

For a long time the story has an unexpectedly light tone, with a comical score by John Addison and characters that are full of snappy patter and wisecracks, helping us to watch serious things without making them too heavy. This belongs to the "It's Grim Up North" school of British filmmaking, but old industrial towns are strangely photogenic. Adapted from a play, it tends to be dialogue-heavy.

British films were more open about certain subjects years before American movies: unwed mother, mixed-race couple, an openly gay character. They also took these things more as a matter of course rather than making a big deal out of them as Hollywood must.

I remember Murray Melvin's exotic looks from Kubrick (Barry Lyndon (1975)) and Ken Russell (The Devils (1971), The Boy Friend (1971)) but this is the first time I've seem him as a featured character. He was the original Geoff in the first stage production; before that he had been making the tea backstage. In an extra he calls himself "the face of gay pride, 1958".

Available on Blu-ray from Criterion.



-Bill
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post #1934 of 1939 Old 08-14-2017, 12:32 PM - Thread Starter
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The Buttercup Chain (1970), directed by Robert Ellis Miller.

A small film discovered while going through Jane Asher's filmography.

Cousins, born on the same day to twin sisters, have always been very close. As young adults they agree to fix each other up with lovers, but what complicates things is their ever present sexual tension and the suspicion that they belong together. Which they cannot act upon or even talk about.

I thought this was going to be a bit of light erotic play in those free-love days where you could gently push the boundaries without being too outrageous. A bit of travelogue when they vacation in Spain, some back-to-the-land when they renovate an old house. They seem to have enough money, which is nice.

It is that in the first part but unexpectedly develops into something deeper. Time doesn't stop and the dating games of youth grow old. Eventually children become adults. A baby changes things and we have the normal tragedies of life and the sad realization that we can't always be happy with the ones we love.

The cast:

  • Hywel Bennett, last seen as the psycho-killer in Twisted Nerve (1968), is the manipulative one, projecting a dark aura of barely repressed desires.
  • Jane Asher, last seen in Deep End (1970) that same year, is his fetching cousin.
  • Leigh Taylor-Young, last seen in Soylent Green (1973), is the American free spirit hippy chick.
  • Sven-Bertil Taube is a Swedish architecture student, definitely male but pleasant and uncomplicated.

Both women do brief nudity, for which many thanks.

Romantic score by Richard Rodney Bennett, cinematography by Douglas Slocombe.

Available on DVD.



-Bill

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post #1935 of 1939 Old 08-19-2017, 06:58 AM - Thread Starter
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Alice in the Cities (1974), directed by Wim Wenders.

A German journalist has not gotten a story he wanted during a road trip across America: he says that once you get outside of New York City it all looks the same. A horrible journey with bad TV and radio and cheap motels. He seems teutonically sour and tends to kick his appliances.

At the airport he helps a German woman and her little girl and keeps them company while waiting for a flight. Mom has to deal with a boyfriend and leaves him a note: "Take Alice to Amsterdam and I'll meet you there". He does but she doesn't. So he and Alice drive around Holland and Germany looking for her grandmother.

Fed up with babysitting he drops her at a police station and goes to an outdoor Chuck Berry concert, which improves his mood. He misses Alice and when they are reunited they continue their journey.

A beautifully made road film. The black-and-white 16mm photography from moving cars and trains tends to make both America and Europe look like ordinary, day-to-day, slightly shabby places. Photographed by Robby Müller. Big grain can be beautiful! Every scene ends with a fade to black.

Could this be made today? The presumption of perversion and sex crime would poison the whole concept. There is no implication of that at all here. Philip instantly becomes Alice's surrogate father and they get on as well as any family, sometimes happy, sometimes fighting. As he becomes used to her she softens him, making him more humane.

The 10-year old Alice acts very naturally and is as complex as any character of her age as I have seen.

Of the cast, only Rüdiger Vogler as Philip and Lisa Kreuzer as the Mom had extensive film careers.

The score is simple and meditative, neither bleak nor jolly. A lot of pop music of the era floats in through the windows.

According to the wikipedia article Wenders had financing for the film when he saw Paper Moon (1973), thought the stories were too similar and wanted to cancel. Director Sam Fuller helped him with a rewrite, saying "Never cancel when you already have the money!"

Available on Blu-ray from Criterion, made from a new scan of the original 16mm negative. The film was originally distributed in 1.37 aspect ratio; the director wanted 1.66 and that is restored here.

Selectable English subtitles only for the German language parts. The commentary track is in German -- a conversation between the director and Yella Rottländer who played Alice -- and also has selectable English subtitles.



-Bill

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post #1936 of 1939 Old 08-19-2017, 10:07 AM
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Alice in the Cities (1974), directed by Wim Wenders.

Available on Blu-ray from Criterion, made from a new scan of the original 16mm negative. The film was originally distributed in 1.37 aspect ratio; the director wanted 1.66 and that is restored here.
-Bill
I got this as part of the Criterion "Wenders Road Trilogy". Of the 3 I thought it was the most engaging. Excellent restorations in all 3 cases.
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post #1937 of 1939 Old Today, 07:23 AM - Thread Starter
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The Boy Friend (1971), written, produced and directed by Ken Russell.

At its core is a real stage musical: The Boy Friend, a tuneful 1954 send-up of zany 1920s romantic comedies. Russell blows this out into the extra dimensions of an backstage/onstage story along with elaborate fantasy singing and dancing sequences.

Stage musicals already use exaggerated acting styles and mugging 1920s silliness pushes this out even farther, so naturally Russell piles on even more in something that looks like Busby Berkeley on acid. If this is not a cult film then I don't know what cultists want.

A surprise: the warm heart of this production is 1960s icon and early supermodel Twiggy, famous (infamous?) for her thin, boyish looks. I do not know much about her, but found her engaging as the love-smitten, earnestly shy Assistant Stage Manager who has to substitute for the star at the last moment. She seems to be playing a character much like herself, which I suspect is not as easy as it sounds. By design, she gives the only natural performance in the film.

It helps that Sandy Wilson's tunes are pleasant enough, and a couple of numbers are borrowed from Singin' in the Rain (1951).

I think theater people would like this one: the ongoing chaos and last minute disasters of a stage production, the cast playing their hearts out for small and indifferent audiences, little love affairs, some treachery and backstabbing.

I'm probably missing a lot of theater humor, but I caught:

  • When they need her to stall on stage, a dancer is told to "Do a Ruby Keeler!" She was a frequent star of 1930s musicals.
  • We get a spot-on Glynis Johns impression, she of the deep velvety voice.
  • A silent bit has even more elaborate silent film mannerisms.
  • All the cast members have a backstory we can guess at if we watch them closely, the significant glances they exchange.
  • They are all playing to a famous Hollywood director watching from an exclusive box. He represents the film viewer, being delighted and exasperated for us.

Uncredited Glenda Jackson is the original star with a broken leg. With Murray Melvin, last seen in A Taste of Honey (1961).

Roger Ebert called the film "joyless".

Available on Blu-ray from Warner Archive and pretty good looking. Includes subtitles, always a good thing on Russell pictures.



-Bill

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post #1938 of 1939 Old Today, 07:59 AM
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Bill -- Thanks a million for reminding me of this deliciously silly musical romp with Twiggy. I found it at the Kaleidescape Store and it is downloading to my Kscape Strato now. Am really looking forward to seeing it again. My wife and I saw Twiggy on Broadway in 1983 in Tommy Tune's wonderful My One and Only, featuring the music of George Gershwin. Tune and his costar, Charles "Honi" Coles, won Tony Awards for their performances. All I remember about Twiggy is that we found her performance to be surprisingly adequate. Anyway, it was a fun night in the theater.
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post #1939 of 1939 Old Today, 09:56 AM
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Includes subtitles, always a good thing on Russell pictures.
Seems to be a welcome and AFAICT new addition to WA releases. I picked up the three recently released Powell/Loy pics and they all have subtitles whereas earlier WA films IME do not.
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