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post #181 of 196 Old 07-08-2011, 07:43 PM
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I would add to the last three posts about Beethoven (that I'm much in agreement with) that his struggle with deafness has always fascinated me. I don't know of any other artist who had that particular struggle. To still have the ability to create, but not the ability to truly experience his creations must have been exquisite torture. For him, the music was forever confined to his mind.
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post #182 of 196 Old 07-08-2011, 10:12 PM
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I really can't pick a [Beethoven] "favorite."
The piano sonatas?
The string quartets?
The symphonies?
The concertos?


The late string quartets, the late piano sonatas, the Diabelli Variations, the late Bagatelles.

Pretty much the late everything

Symphonies: 3rd, 7th, 9th, and the one I never ever tire of, the 6th

CW Hinkle
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post #183 of 196 Old 07-09-2011, 12:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Shaded Dogfood View Post

The late string quartets, the late piano sonatas, the Diabelli Variations, the late Bagatelles.

Pretty much the late everything

Symphonies: 3rd, 7th, 9th, and the one I never ever tire of, the 6th

We must have been separated at birth....
The last 4 piano sonatas
Missa Solemnis
The late quartets
The Diabellis
(there is a superb new version just out by Paul Lewis...best I have ever heard).

Late Beethoven is a world unto itself; there is nothing quite like it.
There is no facade, it is all out there to be examined.
At times, it is almost uncomfortable to listen to....as though one is a voyeur....looking into the deepest, most private part of someone else's soul.

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post #184 of 196 Old 07-09-2011, 12:57 PM
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Late Beethoven is a world unto itself; there is nothing quite like it.
There is no facade, it is all out there to be examined.
At times, it is almost uncomfortable to listen to....as though one is a voyeur....looking into the deepest, most private part of someone else's soul.


Even more than that, at points in his late works its as if you are looking past death into whatever comes after. This is particularly evident in Jacob Lateiner's transcendent performance of piano Sonata #32 Op. 111 (LSC-3016, also available in the Time-Life Beethoven box), or those last string quartets (I favored the Budapest stereo version as it was the first one I heard, but those in the know say that version is not the best).

Even Wagner, that despicable old egotist, was tremendously impressed with the last quartets, even though they were considered almost unlistenable- some sort of delusion born of Beethoven's deafness- until the 20th century. I think they are best listened to late at night.

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post #185 of 196 Old 07-09-2011, 01:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Shaded Dogfood View Post
Even more than that, at points in his late works its as if you are looking past death into whatever comes after./ This is particularly evident in Jacob Lateiner's transcendent performance of piano Sonata #32 Op. 111 (LSC-3016, also available in the Time-Life Beethoven box)
I haven't heard his performance....have to check it out.

Here are my favorite perfomances of the late (or any) sonatas:
Stephen Kovacevich on EMI and Paul Lewis on Harmonia Mundi.
Richard Goode on Nonesuch is also excellent.

Quote:
those last string quartets (I favored the Budapest stereo version as it was the first one I heard, but those in the know say that version is not the best).

Even Wagner, that despicable old egotist, was tremendously impressed with the last quartets, even though they were considered almost unlistenable- some sort of delusion born of Beethoven's deafness- until the 20th century. I think they are best listened to late at night.
Laying down in comfy spot in the dark, in the quiet, and putting on a late quartet is a sublime moment.
Empty the mind and let the music take you away to a place where this world doesn't exist.

There are many fine performances on disk.
Tokyo Quartet on RCA, Emerson on DG, Cleveland on Telarc, all are very good.
Have not heard the Budapest.....

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post #186 of 196 Old 07-09-2011, 02:28 PM
 
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post #187 of 196 Old 07-10-2011, 12:39 AM
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Originally Posted by oink View Post

NO love for Bach?

OK, alphabetically we go....
How about BEETHOVEN?

For me, the art and life of Beethoven is the most fascinating in music history.

An extremely complicated man on an artistic and personal level.
Those who knew or claimed to don't provide a lot of insight to his inner world.
Nearly everyone described him as peculiar and/or difficult.
Having read a great deal about his life and the world he lived in, he becomes more mysterious, more fascinating.
Of all the great artists, he is the one I would have most wanted to meet in the flesh.

Exactly where did his muse come from?
Why is it so different than all other musicians' before or since?
No one knows now and no one knew then.

In my CD collection I have nearly every piece he composed.
Some is better than others, but all are interesting (at a minimum).

I really can't pick a "favorite."
The piano sonatas?
The string quartets?
The symphonies?
The concertos?

I guess if I had to take one recording to my hypothetical island in the middle of nowhere it would be the 9th Symphony.
Not only because it shows Beethoven in his various guises, but it is also a message of hope.

And Hope would be kinda important on my desert island....

LOL Hope about what? that you libs wise up one day? I won't hold my breath.
Anyway for me it's the Emperor Concerto which was also written while he was already deaf. Beethoven wasn't complex at all, he simply knew who he was and what he can accomplish on his own, through his individuality, and enormous talent. Unlike his predecessors like Mozart he hated the aristocracy and to being their servant in order to be a musician and making a living.
In today's " touchy feely change and hopey " bs pc times he would be considered an egomaniac, but from my POV he was simply a genius, no mystery there at all.

sent via Morse code...........

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post #188 of 196 Old 07-10-2011, 01:15 AM
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LOL Hope about what? that you libs wise up one day? I won't hold my breath.
Anyway for me it's the Emperor Concerto which was also written while he was already deaf. Beethoven wasn't complex at all, he simply knew who he was and what he can accomplish on his own, through his individuality, and enormous talent. Unlike his predecessors like Mozart he hated the aristocracy and to being their servant in order to be a musician and making a living.
In today's " touchy feely change and hopey " bs pc times he would be considered an egomaniac, but from my POV he was simply a genius, no mystery there at all.

Oh, my....
I touched a nerve?
I don't believe it....Huns are tougher than that.

Hope
is about the Ode to Joy.
http://www.raptusassociation.org/ode1785.html
Hope is about getting the he!! off my desert island!

What do you think I meant?

"Simply a genius?"
Genius is never simple, or we all would be one.

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post #189 of 196 Old 07-10-2011, 03:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oink View Post

Oh, my....
I touched a nerve?

Hardly.
Quote:


I don't believe it....Huns are tougher than that.

You bet.
Quote:



Hope is about the Ode to Joy.

Yeah I've read that the first time too.
Quote:


http://www.raptusassociation.org/ode1785.html
Hope is about getting the he!! off my desert island!

What do you think I meant?

It wasn't about what you meant but the use of the word Hope which is nothing but an over used cliche to me.
Quote:


"Simply a genius?"
Genius is never simple, or we all would be one.

See, no wonder you're confused, there is no hope for you.

sent via Morse code...........

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post #190 of 196 Old 07-10-2011, 03:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thehun View Post

It wasn't about what you meant but the use of the word Hope which is nothing but an over used cliche to me.

Ah, now I understand.
I would admit the word has become an unpopular "word" in some circles.
Of course, I wasn't thinking of that at the time.


Quote:


See, no wonder you're confused, there is no hope for you.

There never was....
I have no idea how I made it this far.

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post #191 of 196 Old 03-31-2013, 06:51 PM
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With his 180th birthday coming up in another month or so and because I feel somewhat guilty (after introducing Bach and Beethoven earlier) if I didn't complete the third "B" of classical music: Johannes Brahms.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahms

I came to Brahms slowly, but as I get older I have come to regard him as one of my favorite composers.
The last to uphold the old German School of tonality, his music is the other bookend to the Romantic Era.
A very private person with a lot friends (if that makes any sense).


Some favorite recordings:

Symphonies 1-4, Overtures, and Haydn Variations
Claudio Abbado and the Berlin Philharmonic

Piano Concertos 1-2
Stephen Kovacevich
Nelson Freire

Violin Concerto
Joshua Bell
Last year I had the good fortune to see him perform this great masterpiece.
We had some of the best seats in the house....his Strad has a tone of breath-taking perfection.
eek.gif

A German Requiem
John Eliot Gardner and the Monteverdi Choir


The chamber and vocal music is too much to list here.
If anyone is interested in my favs, PM me.wink.gif

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post #192 of 196 Old 03-31-2013, 09:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oink View Post

With his 180th birthday coming up in another month or so and because I feel somewhat guilty (after introducing Bach and Beethoven earlier) if I didn't complete the third "B" of classical music: Johannes Brahms.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahms

I came to Brahms slowly, but as I get older I have come to regard him as one of my favorite composers.
The last to uphold the old German School of tonality, his music is the other bookend to the Romantic Era.
A very private person with a lot friends (if that makes any sense).


Some favorite recordings:

Symphonies 1-4, Overtures, and Haydn Variations
Claudio Abbado and the Berlin Philharmonic

Piano Concertos 1-2
Stephen Kovacevich
Nelson Freire

Violin Concerto
Joshua Bell
Last year I had the good fortune to see him perform this great masterpiece.
We had some of the best seats in the house....his Strad has a tone of such perfection.
eek:

A German Requiem
John Eliot Gardner and the Monteverdi Choir


The chamber and vocal music is too much to list here.

This is a nice blast from the past, thanks for reviving the thread. I don't buy much recorded music anymore but when I did, performances of Brahms' works were among them, along with Bach, Beethoven, Verdi, Puccini, and a bunch of other old guys.smile.gif These days, the great 5.1 and 7.1 lossless audio we routinely get with BD movies have spoiled me for old time 2 channel CDs from back in the day. I know higher quality recordings of classical music are available but they are more expensive and hard to come by than I want to put up with.
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post #193 of 196 Old 04-01-2013, 01:16 AM
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This is a nice blast from the past, thanks for reviving the thread. I don't buy much recorded music anymore but when I did, performances of Brahms' works were among them, along with Bach, Beethoven, Verdi, Puccini, and a bunch of other old guys.smile.gif These days, the great 5.1 and 7.1 lossless audio we routinely get with BD movies have spoiled me for old time 2 channel CDs from back in the day. I know higher quality recordings of classical music are available but they are more expensive and hard to come by than I want to put up with.
As you know, most great classical recordings were originally 2 channel.
That's OK for me, as I only listen to CDs on my 2 channel systems.

However, it is very disappointing so many of the these original records haven't been given the SACD Hybrid treatment or LPCM releases.
I do have SACD releases of original recordings of more than 50 years ago that can hold their own with modern releases/recordings.
I would replace many of my favorite recordings, if I could get better audio quality releases....

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post #194 of 196 Old 04-01-2013, 06:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwsat View Post


This is a nice blast from the past, thanks for reviving the thread. I don't buy much recorded music anymore but when I did, performances of Brahms' works were among them, along with Bach, Beethoven, Verdi, Puccini, and a bunch of other old guys.smile.gif These days, the great 5.1 and 7.1 lossless audio we routinely get with BD movies have spoiled me for old time 2 channel CDs from back in the day. I know higher quality recordings of classical music are available but they are more expensive and hard to come by than I want to put up with.

www.sa-cd.net makes it pretty easy.


Kal Rubinson

"Music in the Round"
Senior Contributing Editor, Stereophile
http://www.stereophile.com/category/music-round

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post #195 of 196 Old 04-01-2013, 11:06 AM
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www.sa-cd.net makes it pretty easy.
Thanks, Kal.

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post #196 of 196 Old 04-08-2013, 08:23 AM
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I recently moved some of the ex-wife's stuff to my neighbor's storage unit (yeah, I know - nice guy.) While rearranging the clutter, we discovered a treasure trove of viynl his deceased wife had stored. He told me to pick and choose from anything there since he wasn't going to use them. Walked away with (among others):

- "Tschaikowsky's Complete Suites For Orchestra"
- "Beethoven's Complete String Quartets"
- "Fantasia" master discs
- "Gounod/Faust/Domingo/Freni/Ghiaurov/Pretre"
- "Greatest Hits of 1790"
- "The Very Best of Liszt"

Looking forward to my daughter going back to school in a week so I'll have some alone time with my new found music.

"I am NOT suffering from insanity... I happen to be enjoying myself!"

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