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post #31 of 56 Old 01-23-2014, 07:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cam Man View Post

They work their butts off to deliver fine, well thought out work...and then the color is drastically changed in post...for a creative motivation that I know of no stated benefit. It's just "the look."

Is there an "integrity line" anywhere that we must realize and acknowledge we're crossing? Just asking? What say you?

I thought it worked well in Matrix and Payback, for example. May have even "made" the movie in some ways. I'm very much a layman in all this so maybe this isn't what you mean.


Also, Cam, I dont remember where it was in this thread but someone said something about needing to go digital in order to get to 4K. I have been under the impression that films resolution exceeded even the best digital. What are the numbers on this?

Thanks for taking this thread on, I hope you don't regret it smile.gif
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post #32 of 56 Old 01-23-2014, 07:44 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Tack View Post

I thought it worked well in Matrix and Payback, for example. May have even "made" the movie in some ways. I'm very much a layman in all this so maybe this isn't what you mean.


Also, Cam, I dont remember where it was in this thread but someone said something about needing to go digital in order to get to 4K. I have been under the impression that films resolution exceeded even the best digital. What are the numbers on this?

Thanks for taking this thread on, I hope you don't regret it smile.gif

I'm often not going to be around to be the one to answer. I hope others will pitch in to help with answers.

Film resolutions discussion here http://www.scarletuser.com/showthread.php?t=5489
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post #33 of 56 Old 01-23-2014, 10:51 PM - Thread Starter
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Okay guys, we've kind of got some info flowing here. AVS is about science, but here I am talking not only the tech, but the creative, and the job. You've heard me talk about two factors I called important (doing my best work and making the day's schedule). There are other elements that we don't cover within the discussions of technology, and I haven't mentioned. An important part of the process is to understand and embrace the collaborateive nature. A number of people in various crafts all come together to create a product. That collaboration is a great joy of the job. It requires one to understand the holistic perspective of the process, participate, contribute, and get along well. In features and television, there is also the craftsmanship of storytelling. You become part of the the "performance" so to speak. To do that successfully, you have to be on your toes and vested in the story and the quality of the product as a whole. Not only do the technicians and director notice this, the actors do as well. This is all essential to working at that level. It's not often talked about outside of the circle of business friends.

That's kind of what I'm trying to bring to you here at AVS. We all really dig home theater and AV system entertainment. But our conversations and sometimes interest turns to how the media is created. So, I want to help you reach some better understanding of that, which may make your enjoyment of your systems richer.

Coolscan submitted an interesting video today by an author that is spearheading progress in the digital workflow. I acknowledged his contributions, but found some things that are really important from the past missing, and even a kind of encouragement to "let go." Coolscan also expressed the concern that he has heard that a lot of DPs are resisting new tools and workflows...which seems to often lead to a particular camera. I tried to impart some of what I felt needed to be added to the considerations. I think I could type all day, but not get enough information imparted. So...

...I'm proposing a fun and informative exercise. It is based in technology, specifically digital cameras and grading in post production, but also addresses the not so technical factors that are the heart of cinematography. Technology can change, but we must hold on to the heart of what cinematography is. What is that?

There is a documentary of sorts called Revenge of the Great Camera Shootout that explores all these things. It is based around a very precisely designed test process where nine different digital cameras are placed in an identical movie set environment. The DP who runs the test has lit that set in a way that is extremely challenging in dynamic range (contrast). Each camera shoots an emprical run with that lighting as an objective test. Then a DP who is very experienced with each camera is brought in to modify/tweak the scene lighting to render the best performance from that specific camera...a kind of subjective test. All are given top post production color correction (grading).

You can participate in this test. The documentary is broken up into three parts. You must watch them in order. There will be lots of (sometimes rambling) interview commentary with some of the great cinematographers. They impart much of what I have kind of been trying to pass along here. But eventually you will see the output of each camera, but you won't be told which is which.

Before you watch, write down on a pad of paper a column starting with A down to I. I'm not even going to tell you what all the cameras are. Indicate your impressions of what you see of each camera, and pick your best and worst three. You will hear other industry professionals give their ratings after the screening they attended.

Progress to Part 2 and you will begin to see that each camera has inherent strengths and weaknesses, but the talent and skills of the DP (and with the colorist) can close the gaps dramatically. The point is that it's not necessarily about the hottest camera.

Once you've gotten through the three parts over the next couple of days, let's return to compare notes and comment. Anyone is welcomed to start it off. If you'e already seen this, I ask that you please not drop any spoilers or inject any flaming. Give everybody a chance to reach their own conclusions.

http://www.zacuto.com/shootout-revenge-2012/revenge-great-camera-shootout-part-one
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post #34 of 56 Old 01-23-2014, 11:45 PM
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Hot damn I gotta try this experiment! Who knows, maybe I'll end up picking reds as my favorite and F65/Alexa as the bottom 3 lol

Might be a busy day tomorrow as I plan on watching this and the documentary Side by Side (2012)

Would you recommend watching this on a computer or an TV/Projector?

Also I was just rewatching a skyfall and was curious to what you thought about the Roger Deakin's work on it. I must say the PQ looks top notch in my opinion.

No subwoofer I've heard has been able to produce the bass I've experienced in the Corps!

Must..stop...buying...every bluray release...
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post #35 of 56 Old 01-24-2014, 07:59 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by pokekevin View Post

Hot damn I gotta try this experiment! Who knows, maybe I'll end up picking reds as my favorite and F65/Alexa as the bottom 3 lol

Might be a busy day tomorrow as I plan on watching this and the documentary Side by Side (2012)

Would you recommend watching this on a computer or an TV/Projector?

Also I was just rewatching a skyfall and was curious to what you thought about the Roger Deakin's work on it. I must say the PQ looks top notch in my opinion.

No worries. I hope everybody that is interested will eventually find the time and post their top three picks...maybe before going on to Part 2. LOL, I wondered about the same things. I was surprised by some things, and not so by others.

I watched on a desktop computer monitor and it is superb HD. I wouldn't recommend a laptop's screen. Otherwise, use a TV or projector.

Regarding Skyfall, I must lead with the fact that Deakins is a favorite. I think Jarhead was the only film he's done that I didn't care for the photography. I thought that his work in Skyfall was excellent. I was particularly fond of the lighting in the Macau casino and at Skyfall. Gorgeous! My only beef with Deakins is personal...that he operates for himself. He can't let go of that position.
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post #36 of 56 Old 01-24-2014, 10:28 AM - Thread Starter
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For your entertainment, some gorgeous eye candy. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wEJpVCTWs8
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post #37 of 56 Old 01-24-2014, 10:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cam Man View Post

In the case of Gravity and films even like Avatar, I guess it should depend on how much influence the DP has in the lighting thoughout the shoot and post. Tough questions to answer, but good for discussion. smile.gif

On this point, consider also that Roger Deakins was a visual consultant on How to Train Your Dragon, and reportedly was very involved with the coloring and virtual lighting throughout the movie. Yet I think we'd all still call that an animated film.

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post #38 of 56 Old 01-24-2014, 11:11 AM
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Sounds like fun! I'll see about giving it a try this weekend.


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post #39 of 56 Old 01-24-2014, 01:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cam Man 
For your entertainment, some gorgeous eye candy. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wEJpVCTWs8
Ironic that the subjects in the "digital" vid are using the (analog?) chem-process to enlarge/print their photos. But it IS gorgeous cinema/videography..
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"I knew you'd say that"...*BLAM!*
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post #40 of 56 Old 01-24-2014, 11:20 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by rezzy View Post

Ironic that the subjects in the "digital" vid are using the (analog?) chem-process to enlarge/print their photos. But it IS gorgeous cinema/videography..

Ha...I had the same reaction.

Here is a test that is quicker to watch. It's a test of only Japanese cameras and two REDs. The Alexa is not included. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKaj9n56vME

Here's one that surprised me featuring the F65 and RED Epic (done by the same Japanese fellow). It's basically a demonstration between 4K and 2K. Seems like there's not going to me much different between the two cameras other than different white balance. They offer side by side views of increasingly tight zooms into the frame in post. It's boring until about midway through the video when they get to 400%. The difference gets quite dramatic. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZcKFonZtGw

You say "So what?" What this shows you is how much room inside the frame you have in post to enlarge and/or reposition without image degredation IF you are going to 2K or HD. It's the principle Fox Sports is using with one 4K camera at each NFL game. They can zoom way into the shot without it falling apart. Here's a nice demonstation example which is also great eye candy. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLqmKPN0iBI
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post #41 of 56 Old 01-25-2014, 05:55 AM
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ALEXA Showreel NAB 2013


'
'
RED REEL 2013 NAB
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post #42 of 56 Old 01-25-2014, 07:39 AM
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I like to point out that all the numerous tests posted show inconsistency in the results between the various test, which shows that they are often done by people who don't know how to treat the different cameras or the post processing or are skewed to favor one camera over the other.
The Zacuto 2012 test was meant to address faults and critics of the 2011 tests, but just added more criticism of how the test was done.

There are a ton of test on CML between almost all cameras (including film vs digital) and non of them shows equal results.
Most of them are done by a guy that consistently bashes RED, so how fair are those tests?

This test is a good example of lack of knowledge of how to do the post-processing of a test (by someone who ought to known better after the numerous test he has done) where he is told;
"I then got a message from Neil Smith of Hollywood DI saying that I shouldn't be matching white-grey-black but that I should be matching skin tones and that he'd had his senior colorist Aaron do this so..."

A new VS test is starting now and the tests will be presented at an Imago (european verion of ASC) event in London end of February, which will include RED Dragon for the first time but without the new OLPF and color science. This time a very capable guy who knows RED cameras inside-out will participate, so if they listen to him it might be a fair test.

The results might be interesting to discuss here, when we also will be able to hear the various comments and critics of the test.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cam Man View Post

Here's one that surprised me featuring the F65 and RED Epic (done by the same Japanese fellow). It's basically a demonstration between 4K and 2K. Seems like there's not going to me much different between the two cameras other than different white balance. They offer side by side views of increasingly tight zooms into the frame in post. It's boring until about midway through the video when they get to 400%. The difference gets quite dramatic. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZcKFonZtGw
Using the quoted test above as an example and the 400% crop-in on how tests often are skewed or faulty;
The F65 derives it image from oversampling a 20mp (actually 17.6mp effective pixels) to 4K. That means that the in-camera process is doing a lot of processing to the sensor data, including sharpening, even when it is recording RAW (just like all DSLR RAW).
The guy shooting this is also quite unclear if he shot the F65 with RAW recorder or just used the processed files.

Then he takes the RED camera shooting it 5K (14mp) and crop it to 4K before he crop in to 400%.
This is highly unfair to the RED camera that only apply compression to RAW and no other processing.

IF he had done it right and fair, he would have oversampled the 5K from the RED to 4K and applied a slight un-sharpening mask to the material, and we could have compared the two crops from an equal footing.

Adding the other test with the girl and the candles; Some of the Epic shots suddenly has deep DOF and look over-sharpened, and blow out the highlights on her face when she leans into the candles, but the Scarlet holds the highlights much better.
When we know that those two cameras has the same sensor and use the same post processing software, what has he done to get that results?

What sort of profile he has shot the Canon 1Dc and C500, I don't know, because they look nothing like other tests I have seen, and Canon usually reproduce red color very good, but here they are all orange.

By looking at all kinds of tests of cameras one can get a good idea of the strength and weaknesses of cameras.
Also take into consideration that progression in sensor technology and post-processing of data happens very rapid, so comparing a camera with a sensor that was released in 2010 with one released in 2012 will almost always give the newest Camera/Senor a upper-hand compared to the competition.
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post #43 of 56 Old 01-25-2014, 10:15 AM - Thread Starter
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Greetings on Saturday.

First, let say to everyone who is dropping in here to check out what's going on. Don't get discouraged or intimidated by the length of some of the posts. There's really good material in them. Also, hang in there if things start to sound a little technical. Get through it and consider the overall point of the post.

For instance, Coolscan has a long post here, but it's really good and informative and he even double spaces things out so you can catch your breath. Kudos to you, Coolscan.

On the other hand, I will resist or remind everybody not to allow anyone's opinion to discourage you from looking at these tests. Despite Coolscan (or someone else) finding fault with how the test was conducted, there are still things to learn from them.

I think we have to be careful that we do have fun here. I realize that most people here are consumers...those who enjoy the final product media, not those who create it. And this is not a production industry website. Therefore, I think it wise that those of us who are from, or have some connection to the production industry must be careful not to live in the weeds. This is not my website, but I wanted to start this thread to discuss things that are interesting, informative, and fun for everybody interested in movies...and specifically the part about photographing them. smile.gif

My perspective is about cinematography...where the camera is only another tool. The art and craft of the cinematographer (DP) in shaping light and shadow and telling a story with a visual device defines cinematography...and that is what is important to me in this thread. I don't care which camera is which. If we get to the point where this becomes too great a discussion that lives in the realm of the engineering of cameras, then that needs to move to another thread (maybe camcorders). In discussing cinematography here, I will strive to keep my communication on a level that is not overwhelming and remains enjoyable.

As you can tell, I am wholeheartedly in support of the prinicipal stated behind the the Revenge of the Great Camera Shootout video; that results are a lot more about cinematography than engineering. In watching Part 1, I downgraded a couple of cameras unfairly on the first pass due to a specific bit of lighting by the DP I didn't like. I had to go back and view again to be fair. Despite the "faults" that Coolscan points out in the testing protocol that may well be true, I can see useful things in these tests. And I have more commentary on the lighting used than the cameras! biggrin.gif I will be talking about that, too, which I hope that everyone will chime in on and enjoy more than engineering discussions about cameras.

Tests like this are only going to be useful to DPs to get a basic idea. Nobody is going to take on a show or purchase a camera without first shooting their own tests. For that reason, I take the tests with a grain of salt, learn what I can, and have fun discussing. I do not have a horse in the race. I don't care what camera is considered best with regards to engineering. Budgets as they are, though, may well mean I can't use the "best." (more on that in another post).

I judge on the merits of the photographic quality I see in the movies and TV shows. When I see something with specific qualities I like, I eventually research what camera was used. But first, I spend significant time watching/studying. My wife has been watching the series Downton Abbey. I've not sat down to take it up, but when passing through the room I have often been highly impressed with the cinematography. Last night I had finally watched so much that I like, I looked up what camera it's done with. That is also the impression I got when I saw Oblivion. I think both look fabulous. Different cameras used.

I regard that approach a pretty good test. Don't pick a camera that you like, then go looking for shows done with it...to like. You will end up being an advocate for the camera for the wrong reasons. When you see things that really catch your eye and you've seen enough to really be impressed, then look up what camera(s) they were done with. Keep a tally of these and include the characteristics you saw that you liked and see what stacks up. That way is far more meaningful than crunching numbers.

Okay, my next post will be my specific impressions from Revenge of the Great Camera Shootout.
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post #44 of 56 Old 01-25-2014, 10:37 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coolscan View Post

ALEXA Showreel NAB 2013


'
'
RED REEL 2013 NAB

Thank you for these!

Everybody should view these directly on the Vimeo site. They suffer signficantly going through the AVS site.

Alexa Reel http://vimeo.com/63639150

RED Reel http://vimeo.com/63060016

It does seem that there is quite an argument about these two cameras. Each has advocates and detractors, but I often think that many don't have the perspective of a cinematographer.

EDIT
In fact, I have a theory about this after watching the two reels above and reflecting on my experience. I wonder if inital preferences for cameras are influenced by the types and looks of the finished shows that seem to line up under the two cameras. It seems to me that a lot of the titles for which the RED cameras were used are greatly manipulated in post with regards to color and contrast. The grading video posted on page one is a good example of this process, but not from digital capture, as both are shot 35mm anamorphic and also IMAX for Ghost Protocol. That type of grading/style gives the end product a look that we can't possibly easily judge how the camera would render the scene with a neutral palate of color and contrast. We do see this type of grading/style more often in the RED reel than the Alexa reel.

EDIT 2: In re-watching these on the Vimeo site, I must correct myself. They are at least equal in this balance of style types. I must say that my impression of the RED reel is much higher when viewed on the Vimeo site than here on AVS. I still think the theory in general below (not from the two reels) is reasonable. End EDIT 2.

My theory is that DPs may (and I'm being diplomatic here wink.gif ) be gravitating to a particular camera intially based on the titles they see that rely more on realistic/natural rendition of color, contrast, and latitude. On those, you can actually make some judgement referencing what those image factors do naturally...to the human eye in the real world. Right or wrong, the balance may intially be swayed by the style of and amount of work that has been done by a given camera that the DP and director have seen. DPs and directors whose show is lining up to do one style or another may lean depending on this. Still, they will do tests, but they indeed might already be leaning a certain direction. Make any sense?

Like it or not, that is how cinematographers work and should keep working. It's not so much about the tools; it's what's done with them. smile.gif It's often the same with AV products and the design and execution of the system within it's environment (dedicated, multi-purpose media room, etc). smile.gif

Man, I'd shoot with either one in a heartbeat.
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post #45 of 56 Old 01-25-2014, 01:39 PM - Thread Starter
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Duplicate. Sorry.
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post #46 of 56 Old 01-26-2014, 07:01 PM - Thread Starter
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I had not see Revenge of the Great Camera shoot out until a couple of days ago. I had seen the one a couple of years back, and I was familiar with criticism of how it was designed. With whatever faults one wants to assign to this one, it is considerably better than the earlier one.

I set up a log like I recommended earlier with A through I. I just used a simple rating of each and wrote down some notes. Because the little scene and action they set up with the actors, I had to watch them all several times. Each pass I was watching for a partiular performance characteristic. Highlights, shadow detail, skin tone, noise in low light areas, resolution, perceived gamma smoothness, etc.

I saw serious motion artifacts immediately on Camera D, and its image was poor.

Next worst for me was Camera G.

Cameras A and F were my top picks. Camera F was clearly tops for me.

C seemed good, but I couldn't distinguish it from the others until I'd seen a few passes.

The others did not all have the same qualities, but all summed up similarly in my ratings. I would really like the resolution and tonal smoothness, but not like the color or something else. Another would be good except in dark areas, etc.

THEN I looked at what cameras I had picked.

How about you guys?
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post #47 of 56 Old 01-30-2014, 12:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cam Man View Post

I'm proposing a fun and informative exercise. It is based in technology, specifically digital cameras and grading in post production, but also addresses the not so technical factors that are the heart of cinematography. Technology can change, but we must hold on to the heart of what cinematography is. What is that?

There is a documentary of sorts called Revenge of the Great Camera Shootout that explores all these things. It is based around a very precisely designed test process where nine different digital cameras are placed in an identical movie set environment. The DP who runs the test has lit that set in a way that is extremely challenging in dynamic range (contrast). Each camera shoots an emprical run with that lighting as an objective test. Then a DP who is very experienced with each camera is brought in to modify/tweak the scene lighting to render the best performance from that specific camera...a kind of subjective test. All are given top post production color correction (grading).

You can participate in this test. The documentary is broken up into three parts. You must watch them in order. There will be lots of (sometimes rambling) interview commentary with some of the great cinematographers. They impart much of what I have kind of been trying to pass along here. But eventually you will see the output of each camera, but you won't be told which is which.

Before you watch, write down on a pad of paper a column starting with A down to I. I'm not even going to tell you what all the cameras are. Indicate your impressions of what you see of each camera, and pick your best and worst three. You will hear other industry professionals give their ratings after the screening they attended.

Progress to Part 2 and you will begin to see that each camera has inherent strengths and weaknesses, but the talent and skills of the DP (and with the colorist) can close the gaps dramatically. The point is that it's not necessarily about the hottest camera.

Once you've gotten through the three parts over the next couple of days, let's return to compare notes and comment. Anyone is welcomed to start it off. If you'e already seen this, I ask that you please not drop any spoilers or inject any flaming. Give everybody a chance to reach their own conclusions.

http://www.zacuto.com/shootout-revenge-2012/revenge-great-camera-shootout-part-one

Amazing! I blindly picked the Alexa, Epic and GH2 as my favorites. The F65 was great except for my perceived magenta push. I loved the experience and I actually took it quite seriously. I was taking notes and going back through the shots multiple times. Thanks for this Cam Man! smile.gif

David Budo
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post #48 of 56 Old 01-30-2014, 04:58 AM
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For people that are fans of Roger Deakins ASC cinematography.

Here is a scene for scene breakdown and analysis by Matthew Scott of the cinematography in the movie PRISONER shot by Roger Deakins ASC.

WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING AT? (dissecting the work of a master)
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post #49 of 56 Old 01-30-2014, 08:03 AM - Thread Starter
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[/quote]
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Originally Posted by Dbuudo07 View Post

Amazing! I blindly picked the Alexa, Epic and GH2 as my favorites. The F65 was great except for my perceived magenta push. I loved the experience and I actually took it quite seriously. I was taking notes and going back through the shots multiple times. Thanks for this Cam Man! smile.gif

My pleasure. I'm glad you enjoyed it. If you search around, you will find lots of tests of different kinds and cameras. Also fun.
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post #50 of 56 Old 01-30-2014, 08:37 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by coolscan View Post

For people that are fans of Roger Deakins ASC cinematography.

Here is a scene for scene breakdown and analysis by Matthew Scott of the cinematography in the movie PRISONER shot by Roger Deakins ASC.

WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING AT? (dissecting the work of a master)

Awesome contribution, Coolscan. That blog breakdown is really an excellent detailed description of a lot of basics that come to be taken for granted, but play an important role in our perception of the story and characters. Roger operates for himself, but much of what is described here with regards to composition, angles, and even placement of props in frame, etc, become the job of the operator. It's interesting how DPs will work with their operator.

What is not mentioned in the blog is that everything starts with the director and actors blocking the scene. They first need to work out what works best for them. The DP is also there, and will make inputs as necessary. Eventually, they are happy, and the attention then turns to blocking for camera. At that time, the camera team is watching the director and DP very closely. A camera assistant silently follows, putting down bits of tape or chalk to mark the positions of the actors and camera. Once satisfied, the director turns the set over to the DP and the 1st AD. The actors (called "first team") are then released, and the stand-ins (called 2nd team) are called in to be used by the camera team to work out the details of the shot. At that time, the DP is asked "How long?" We all are sure to hear what he says.

I really prefer and enjoy having the benefit of lots of input on these things that are to define the look of the show in the early days of the shoot. Most DPs will look through the camera themselves kind of searching for the frame, not necessarily sure what they want. At that time, the operator will watch the video feed closely to see where the DP is headed. The DP will point out all the bits of detail to the operator, and then take off to work on lighting while the operator, AC, and dolly grip work out the nuts and bolts of executing the shot. During this time, the operator will also be watching for anything that might get moved or changed by somebody on the set that would change the shot from its design. Often, it is a race to be ready by the time the DP is ready with lighting. When the DP sees he is almost finished, he gives the 1st AD a ten minute warning. Based on that, the 1st AD will have his guys start wrangling the first team back to the set.

Everybody reconvenes on the set, and usually a short bit of a walk-through may occur, but then it's time to shoot.

After a few days, the operator will usually have the look down, and the DP usually starts leaving a lot of the lineup details of coverage (over the shoulders, closeups, etc) to the operator, but will keep an eye on the video feed. The operator is kind of the "guardian" of the look of the picture, and takes that responsibility rather seriously. He/she watches after the interests of the DP, director, and even the actors to an extent (just to make sure that something embarrassing doesn't slip through, etc). The operator will often consult with the DP, or if permitted by the DP, the director (which is also common when a strong DP/operator relationship exists).

Regarding composition, many things such as balancing the frame and using "the triangle'" are not thought about consciously; it's just how you see composition and kind of always work that way. The operator almost always has the set dresser adjust/place items where they will help the composition. But there are often special touches added that are quite designed (the foreground cross, child in the side view mirror, etc). The director, DP, or even operator may see this. If the operator sees the potential for something like this in the shot, it is brought to the DP for consideration. If he likes the idea, or if he's not sure, he will take it directly to the director to see what he thinks.

I can relate such a touch in the feature, Frailty. The scene where Dad (director/actor Bill Paxton) is discovering "Otis" in a barn was being shot late one afternoon near Bakersfield. Dad has parked his car and approaches the barn basically unseen until he steps into the open barn door which frames him within the frame. A modest dolly move was designed so that we arrive at the final frame the same time as Dad.

While everybody was hustling around preparing the shot, the operator noticed that the dust stirred up in the room enabled impressive shafts of sunlight to stream through the gaps in the slats of the barn wall. If the camera remains static, the shafts are static. If the camera moves slightly, so do the shafts of sunlight. Considering that Dad is about to encounter an event of "devine intervention" and is himself to become a creepy character, the operator saw the potential to use the shafts of light. The operator suggested quietly to the DP that a creeping camera move as we vaguely see someone approaching the barn enhances the supernatural implications and suspense. The DP agreed and took the idea to the director. He liked it, and it's in the movie. smile.gif
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post #51 of 56 Old 02-13-2014, 01:29 PM
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Maybe this for the crowd here:
http://www.tasteofcinema.com/2014/10-films-that-can-teach-you-everything-you-need-to-know-about-cinematography/#GLFH7ZZBJl7JOfo3.16
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post #52 of 56 Old 02-13-2014, 03:44 PM
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Cool.
I wonder whether Cam Man would agree with the choices?
Maybe he has some himself?

A.P.S. deserve our protection....join the cause today!
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post #53 of 56 Old 02-13-2014, 04:04 PM
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Great last post, Cam Man; very informative. I've been reading The ASC and Cinefex for nearly 30 years, and learned a bunch from you in one post. Not saying the rags aren't informative..

"I knew you'd say that"...*BLAM!*
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post #54 of 56 Old 03-20-2014, 09:52 AM
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I watched The Amazing Spider-Man when it was released and thought it was beautifully shot on the Red Epic. However, for The Amazing Spider-Man 2, they've shot it in 35mm film and going for a post production 3D conversion. I guess they got rid of cinematographer John Schwartzman and went with Daniel Mindel who didn't want to work with the digital cameras or 3D rigs. Strange to me.

The footage in the trailer looks great, but we'll see how it all turns out when it's released.

David Budo
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post #55 of 56 Old 04-28-2014, 07:15 PM - Thread Starter
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Helloooo. I know you guys thought I fell off the edge of the earth since I disappeared in February. About the time of that last post, my 2007-era desktop PC failed dramatically. I limped by for a month on my son's laptop to pay bills, but didn't come to AVS for a long, long time.

The hold up was so that I could research and gain the courage to build a custom PC. I got the courage, then got called to go work on a feature for a while (Red Epic 4K capture). When I got home, I went to work on the build out.

It's all complete and successful now. Files all restored thanks to primary HDD on the old PC not failing, and Carbonite. Now I surf AVS with blistering speed. eek.gifbiggrin.gif

Darth, great film school memories there. Thanks for that.
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post #56 of 56 Old 04-28-2014, 07:16 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dbuudo07 View Post

I watched The Amazing Spider-Man when it was released and thought it was beautifully shot on the Red Epic. However, for The Amazing Spider-Man 2, they've shot it in 35mm film and going for a post production 3D conversion. I guess they got rid of cinematographer John Schwartzman and went with Daniel Mindel who didn't want to work with the digital cameras or 3D rigs. Strange to me.

The footage in the trailer looks great, but we'll see how it all turns out when it's released.

Even more strange is JJ shooting SW 7 35 anamorphic. rolleyes.gif
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