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post #1 of 6 Old 08-25-2015, 06:24 PM - Thread Starter
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TV shows From Color to B&W

Don't bother googling the question because you'll get a bunch of links to shows that went from B&W to color and that's not the question.

I know of only three shows that actually went from being in color to B&W and those are...

Science Fiction Theatre
Season 1 was in color while the second and final season was B&W.

The Perry Como Show
It started out in B&W and then went to color in a later season, was cancelled by its network but picked up by another network the following season and again aired in B&W.

Wagon Train
Six seasons in a one hour B&W format but was given a 90 minute and color format in its seventh season. For the eighth and final season Wagon Train reverted back to the one hour B&W format.

Anyone know of any other shows that went from color to B&W?
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post #2 of 6 Old 08-27-2015, 12:03 AM
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If this is a win on a technicality, that works for me! lol.

Hazel: Season 1, Episode 6
What'll We Watch Tonight? (2 Nov. 1961)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0598526/
Quote:
Did You Know?

Trivia
Although the first season was in black and white, this one episode was filmed in color: Hazel gets a color TV. RCA was NBC's parent company and arranged for all shows to be in color on this date to promote sales of color televisions.
It fits your criteria, right? This TV show was in color and then subsequent episodes went back to B&W...apparently something repeated for all NBC shows that night.

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post #3 of 6 Old 08-27-2015, 12:28 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hitchfan View Post
If this is a win on a technicality, that works for me! lol.

Hazel: Season 1, Episode 6
What'll We Watch Tonight? (2 Nov. 1961)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0598526/


It fits your criteria, right? This TV show was in color and then subsequent episodes went back to B&W...apparently something repeated for all NBC shows that night.

Naw, that don't count. Otherwise we could include shows like Perry Mason that aired one color episode or Mash that aired one B&W episode. I'm talking about TV series that switched from regularly airing in color for at least a season to full time B&W for the next season.

Still that's very interesting what you posted about the Hazel show. I never knew they stuck a color episode in during season 1. Wonder what the other show's were that NBC aired in color that night? I did a search but came up empty.
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post #4 of 6 Old 08-28-2015, 09:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tim58hsv View Post
Naw, that don't count. Otherwise we could include shows like Perry Mason that aired one color episode or Mash that aired one B&W episode. I'm talking about TV series that switched from regularly airing in color for at least a season to full time B&W for the next season.

Still that's very interesting what you posted about the Hazel show. I never knew they stuck a color episode in during season 1. Wonder what the other show's were that NBC aired
in color that night? I did a search but came up empty.
Possibly this was during a sweeps week? Color was still a really big deal back then, with NBC being the only game in town for years.

You might find some answers by going to the library and checking microfilm of newspapers. You have a date.
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post #5 of 6 Old Yesterday, 05:15 AM
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^ IMDb says that HAZEL episode aired on November 2nd of that year, a strategic pre-Christmas time period. Since RCA was the parent company of NBC and they apparently aired the color episodes that night to promote the sale of color TVs, that timing would have been perfect. Everyone would have time to talk about it, think about it, and discuss this major investment as a family over Thanksgiving dinner later that month. These were not impulse purchases by any means. It required some serious family conferences.

It was such a big deal to get a COLOR TV in your living room those days! What a thrill it was to watch Ruff & Ready cartoons in all that glorious color! I mean...right there in your living room!!
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post #6 of 6 Old Today, 10:01 PM
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I've got a couple more for you.

"The Mel Torme Show" on CBS, aired its first episodes in September and October of 1951 in color, and then switched over to B&W in November. Same for the "Mike and Buff" show, which was a live talk show produced in NY featuring Mike Wallace and Buff Cobb.

The "Ford Theater" series was also broadcast in color on NBC from 1954 to 1956. Broadcasts reverted back to B&W though for its final season on CBS between 1956 to 1957. This was the first series regularly shot on color film, according to Wikipedia.

"The Lucy Show" was filmed in color beginning in 1963, but broadcast in B&W through the 1964-65 season. Also, the pilot for "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea" was filmed in color, but aired in B&W. The show then switched over to color in its 2nd season, in 1965.

A salient passage from a Wikipedia article on color TV re some other possible candidates...

Quote:
Several syndicated shows had episodes filmed in color during the 1950s, including The Cisco Kid, The Lone Ranger, My Friend Flicka, and Adventures of Superman. The first two were carried by some stations equipped for color telecasts well before NBC began its regular weekly color dramas in 1959, beginning with the Western series Bonanza.

NBC was at the forefront of color programming because its parent company RCA manufactured the most successful line of color sets in the 1950s, and by 1959 RCA was the only remaining major manufacturer of color sets.[63] CBS and ABC, which were not affiliated with set manufacturers and were not eager to promote their competitor's product, dragged their feet into color.[64][65] CBS broadcast color specials and sometimes aired its big weekly variety shows in color, but it offered no regularly scheduled color programming until the fall of 1965.
The first color TVs didn't actually go on sale to US consumers until 1954, so not many people saw those early 1951 CBS colorcasts. The National Production Authority banned the manufacture and sale of color TV receivers to consumers from late 1951 to early 1953 ostensibly because of the Korean conflict. So that's undoubtedly the main reason why color production and broadcasts effectively ceased during that period. Also, the initial NTSC standard for color broadcasts wasn't approved until December of 1953.

There are undoubtedly a number of other series in the 1950's, and possibly the early 1960's which had pilots or early episodes filmed in color, and then went back to B&W due to lower production costs, and the slow rate of adoption of color television. I couldn't tell you which ones, off the top of my head. But I'd concentrate my searches on the early color shows on NBC and CBS during the 1950's, and early 60's.

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