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Local HDTV Info and Reception

difuse's Avatar difuse
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Quote:
Originally Posted by veedon View Post
I think you underestimate the level of public interest in the story at the time. "John John" was only 38 years old when he died, and there was speculation that he might get into politics. One of New York's U.S. Senate seats was about to become vacant with the retirement of Senator Moynihan, and there was a lot of speculation about who would be Moynihan's successor.

So, although some TV viewers may have known "John John" only as the man who caused Elaine Benes to lose a bet, there were some very valid reasons for the TV networks to cover the story, even though not much information was available right away.

The worst news coverage I ever saw was the month-long canonization ceremony for President Reagan, where the networks essentially threw away any semblance of journalism.
I think I call draw a rational line. Reagan was a two term president, and, had been governor of California. JFK,jr. had a famous name, and, was perhaps good fodder for writers with nothing else to write about in Metro NYC and Boston. I will credit Kennedy with honestly failing the NY Bar Exam, and I do not have any negative impression of him because of his undistinguished career in law..
Nor do I have negatives in mind because he edited/published a magazine that could not sustain itself, despite a certain interest due to the Kennedy name
We probably would not be having this discussion were it not for Ron Reagan. I carry no luggage for this, or any president, as I have basic issues with the office as it is. But, it was Reagan who put burrs under saddles to develop American HDTV. Had he not done so, then this forum would not be as it is today, as our TV today would have a different history.
My bottom line is that I missed the British Open due to, in my mind, network news silliness. Perhaps there was a compensation factor involved. because of some perceived slights in reporting of Prinvess Diana, who had been inconsiderate enough to be killed on a Friday night. I don't know. However your critique of the coverage of Ronald Regan's passing suggests that some think the silliness went on.
veedon's Avatar veedon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by difuse View Post
... But, it was Reagan who put burrs under saddles to develop American HDTV. Had he not done so, then this forum would not be as it is today, as our TV today would have a different history.
.
Yeah, and if FDR hadn't made that presentation at the 1939 World's Fair, the U.S. would have never had television at all!
difuse's Avatar difuse
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Quote:
Originally Posted by veedon View Post
Yeah, and if FDR hadn't made that presentation at the 1939 World's Fair, the U.S. would have never had television at all!
Reagan saw the Japanese MUSE system as another threat to the US electronics industry, and, wanted the US to develop its own high definition TV.. Reagan was no technological visionary, but a pragmatist.
No matter how one will view Ronald Reagan, the industry-government association that led to the current ATSC standards began in his first term, and continued.
veedon's Avatar veedon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by difuse View Post
Reagan saw the Japanese MUSE system as another threat to the US electronics industry, and, wanted the US to develop its own high definition TV.. Reagan was no technological visionary, but a pragmatist.
No matter how one will view Ronald Reagan, the industry-government association that led to the current ATSC standards began in his first term, and continued.

Well, I guess there are enough commendations to go around, then! FDR launched broadcast commercial TV, Ronald Reagan kept HDTV on track (perhaps he used the money from the arms sales to Iran), and Al Gore invented the internet!

Seriously, a lot of what presidents do is just photo ops.
difuse's Avatar difuse
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Quote:
Originally Posted by veedon View Post
Well, I guess there are enough commendations to go around, then! FDR launched broadcast commercial TV, Ronald Reagan kept HDTV on track (perhaps he used the money from the arms sales to Iran), and Al Gore invented the internet!

Seriously, a lot of what presidents do is just photo ops.
Couldn't be a photo op in Reagan's case, the press really did not care.
Serious clearly not your intent, I'll help with the silliness.
. George H W Bush discovered bar code scanning.
Bill Clinton invented the electric switch. It allows TVs to be cut off if a program supplier says so.
Dwight Eisenhower discovered NTSC color..
difuse's Avatar difuse
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post
Hello! (hello) (hello) (hello) (hello) (hello) (hello)
I hope YOU'RE satisfied.
foxeng's Avatar foxeng
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Quote:
Originally Posted by veedon View Post
Yeah, and if FDR hadn't made that presentation at the 1939 World's Fair, the U.S. would have never had television at all!
We would still have had TV, just a different form. And probably even later than we did get it.

By 1939, Great Britain, France and Germany all had operational terrestrial television of some type on the air. Great Britain being the first country to have both an OTA mechanical and electronic system (the Baird and the Marconi-EMI system otherwise known as the 405 line system and called the first HD system because the resolution was so much higher than the former standard of mechanical, which they used until 1985) as far back as 1933 before RCA starting serious research on TV on the 86th floor of the Empire State Building (ESB wasn't completed until 1934). There is a film that the RCA engineers recorded at ESB of the 405 line system on a skip from Great Britain in 1934. It is on YouTube if you want to see it. The changing signal level makes it hard to see clearly but you can see it.

The Germans were playing catch up and used an early version of a 343 line RCA system they hacked to 441 for their system and used it to broadcast the Berlin Olympic Games in 1936 OTA in Berlin to Nazi Party members and to "Viewing Parlors" set up around the city for visitors to see what TV was all about. This 441 line system was also taken to Paris and was used there until Paris fell to the Allies in 1944. The Berlin OTA transmitter ran until almost the last days of the Third Reich when the site was bombed by Allied Forces just before the Allies marched into Berlin. It was well into the late 50's before TV returned to West Germany and later for East Germany.

The US was actually a "johnny come-lately" when it came to TV deployment before World War 2 even though American Philo T. Farnsworth invented the electron scanning system that RCA stole in the late 20's/early 30's and became the world standard still used today. The fact that the US did not have to rebuild after World War 2 as did Europe/Japan allowed the US to jump ahead of Europe/Japan in TV development and deployment well into the 80's. Remember the US authorized color TV in 1954. The Brits didn't get it until 1968 and Europe, into the 70's.
foxeng's Avatar foxeng
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Quote:
Originally Posted by difuse View Post
I hope YOU'RE satisfied.
Yes quite.
difuse's Avatar difuse
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post
We would still have had TV, just a different form. And probably even later than we did get it.

.
I cannot imagine the '39 World's fair had any impact on US television development. The whole "introduction" of TV there was just David Sarnoff theatrics. There was nothing new in TV introduced there.
A year earlier NBC- RCA had been broadcasting electronic television, both studio and remote, and CBS had been dogging RCA with its own efforts. In fact the whole business went back years before.
Toward the end of 1938, Dumont announced it would be selling receivers. That caused two decisions to be made by RCA. First, NBC-RCA would suspend TV broadcasting until the opening day of the World's Fair at the end of April, '39, to coincide with the first RCA receivers going on the market, and, the new CBS TV transmitter was not going to be ready for delivery until after that. Sarnoff was not interested in any thoughts about TV not including NBC-RCA. TV and the World's Fair was RCA propaganda. The actual red-letter year was 1941 when NBC and CBS began broadcasting in the current analog specs commercially.(channels 1 and 2 , respectively) (the NTSC had been established in 1940).. Had the US entered WW2 a year earlier, broadcast specs after the war might have been different than what had been decided in '41. But, as it is, one with a '41 receiver could still use it today for analog reception. If one had to pin a year on the introduction of US television, I'd pin it on '41, not '39.
foxeng's Avatar foxeng
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Quote:
Originally Posted by difuse View Post
I cannot imagine the '39 World's fair had any impact on US television development. The whole "introduction" of TV there was just David Sarnoff theatrics. There was nothing new in TV introduced there.
DEVELOPMENT, no, 1939 had nothing to do with it. It was pretty much done by then. DEPLOYMENT, it had EVERYTHING to do with it in 1939. Americans had not seen television before the Worlds Fair, Sarnoff use it to introduce TV to the American market, even though the BBC had been keeping a television schedule for a number of years prior along with Germany and to a lessor extent France. And even in 1939, experimental would still be a good word to use for the state of US television since there was no broadcasting to the RCA TV pavilion at the Worlds Fair. It was all closed circuit. Interesting note, when Germany invaded France, they dumped the French system and replaced it with the German 441 line system.

The FCC authorized the television service, effective Sept 1, 1939. Before then, it had been an experimental service with only NBC, CBS and Dumont with any transmitters and those were in New York City and even after Sept 1, none really kept any regular broadcast schedule, but NBC did try until the start of the war, but it was only at night and not every night when they all shut down the transmitters to concentrate on the war effort. US TV's birthday is considered Sept 1, 1939 even though it never really took off until 1946.

In reality, TV didn't have time before World War 2. Even before Sept 1, 1939, it was pretty obvious war was on the horizon for the US. It wasn't an "if", but a "when". It was widely known Hitler would strike somewhere, just where, (Poland on that fateful Sept 1 day) and even then, domestic production was starting to gear towards wartime production, just waiting for a declaration to be issued to stop domestic production. And many thought it would be Germany that would declare war on the US, not a Japanese sneak attack. After war was declared on December 8, 1941, 99.5% of research and production of TV in the US stopped until 1946. During the war years, many advances in electronics moved the state of the art to the point that when TV service was resumed in 1946, the FCC was on its way of making the changes in transmission of the video and change to FM audio and frequency changes so when stations really stated to come on the air in 1947, it is what we are familiar with today. It is interesting to note in the historic files of the FCC, work within the agency continued on TV through the war anticipating the resumption of TV after the war.

And yes, a TV from 1939 WOULD receive a black and white NTSC video signal, proper decoding of a color compatible signal would be debatable (it would be fun to try it though, you got one?), it would not receive audio since the audio section would be AM, not FM. FM not coming until 1946 with Sarnoff unsuccessfully stopping Armstrong's FM to be used for TV audio but then getting the FCC to move FM from the 40 MHz band to its current 88-108 band. A lot of stuff going on at the FCC with TV and FM in an 18 month time frame after the war.
difuse's Avatar difuse
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post
And yes, a TV from 1939 WOULD receive a black and white NTSC video signal, proper decoding of a color compatible signal would be debatable (it would be fun to try it though, you got one?), it would not receive audio since the audio section would be AM, not FM. FM not coming until 1946 with Sarnoff unsuccessfully stopping Armstrong's FM to be used for TV audio but then getting the FCC to move FM from the 40 MHz band to its current 88-108 band. A lot of stuff going on at the FCC with TV and FM in an 18 month time frame after the war.
Unfortunately, I do not have a '39 US TV receiver. There were few made, and, most I would think were converted to NTSC, or scrapped. I have doubts that a viewable picture from an NTSC signal could be had on one. NBC and CBS were both employing 441 line transmission then. Some modification would be required, including a notch filter for the color issue, as you pointed out, could be an problem.
The FM thing is worth a book. Major Armstrong developed FM in the 30's. In the late 30's, a group of stations in New England, styled "The Yankee Network", converted to FM on the 42-50 MC band the FCC had allowed them.. That double angered David Sarnoff. First, that they existed, because FM was not "his".And those stations crossed another line. They networked themselves, by receiving their programming from other affiliates OTA, something that certainly could not be done with AM.
The very idea: stations could create and distribute programming without ....huh...... maybe without the NBC Networks.
Meanwhile, RCA could not stop FM as the means of NTSC sound in '41. But Sarnoff got a big lick in. The last year of WW2, he plotted and succeeded in getting the FCC to move FM radio to its current band, instantly creating zero audience for FM radio: no receivers. It took ten years for FM radio to recover. Stations converted, others came on the air, but, who wanted an FM radio, when there was television?
veedon's Avatar veedon
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The articles that I have read say that the FCC did not issue any licenses for commercial television broadcasts until the summer of 1941 and no stations actually used those licenses until July 1, 1941, when NBC(WNBT, Channel 1) and CBS (WCBW, Channel 2) began commercial broadcasts in NYC. Before that, all U.S. broadcasts were classified as experimental.
veedon's Avatar veedon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post
We would still have had TV, just a different form. And probably even later than we did get it.
I was just joking in my remark concerning FDR and the 1939 World's Fair. I thought that another poster was giving President Reagan too much credit for the development of HDTV, so I figured why not get in a plug for a truly great president, as opposed to the fellow about whom Jane Wyman was eventually right. (I wonder if I can still get one of those bumper stickers.)
difuse's Avatar difuse
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Originally Posted by difuse View Post
It took ten years for FM radio to recover. Stations converted, others came on the air, but, who wanted an FM radio, when there was television?
To stay on topic, one of the post WW2 FM radio attempts was by the Greensboro News Company
which got WFMY-FM on the air in 1948.. But by then GNC was looking at TV, and, WFMY-TV made its debut in 1949. Between the two, TV was by far more promising.. WFMY-FM went silent in 1952, not to be active again until 1962 as WQMG under new ownership. FM radio was not as big a loser as UHF TV in the 50'sm but it struggled. It woke up in the 60's with stereo, the 70's with car radios and the 80's with personal listening devices. It took off, but left its name on one of the triad's TV stations
foxeng's Avatar foxeng
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
The articles that I have read say that the FCC did not issue any licenses for commercial television broadcasts until the summer of 1941 and no stations actually used those licenses until July 1, 1941, when NBC(WNBT, Channel 1) and CBS (WCBW, Channel 2) began commercial broadcasts in NYC. Before that, all U.S. broadcasts were classified as experimental.
Yeah, they were having that big Channel 1 issue (exactly what frequencies would be channel 1 because of the FM band sitting there) that got shelved until after the war with channel 1 being deleted (hence no channel 1 in TV) and FM moving to 88-108 after all that. There is no record of WNBT ever using channel 1 or the transmitter ever being installed on channel 1. All that held up the actual commercial licenses from being issued, but the experimental licenses stayed active until the permament licenses were issued later. Same kind of thing happened with WRAL and DTV. Experimental station WRAL-HD channel 32 continued to operate until 2000 when permanent WRAL-DT channel 52 became operational. Start date of DTV was November 1, 1998.
foxeng's Avatar foxeng
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Originally Posted by difuse View Post
To stay on topic, one of the post WW2 FM radio attempts was by the Greensboro News Company
which got WFMY-FM on the air in 1948.. But by then GNC was looking at TV, and, WFMY-TV made its debut in 1949. Between the two, TV was by far more promising.. WFMY-FM went silent in 1952, not to be active again until 1962 as WQMG under new ownership. FM radio was not as big a loser as UHF TV in the 50'sm but it struggled. It woke up in the 60's with stereo, the 70's with car radios and the 80's with personal listening devices. It took off, but left its name on one of the triad's TV stations
Thought I had seen WFMY-FM was on 97.3, not 97.1. WQMG was actually a new license after WFMY-FM was deleted, an old time WFMY employee told me once.
difuse's Avatar difuse
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Originally Posted by foxeng View Post
Thought I had seen WFMY-FM was on 97.3, not 97.1. WQMG was actually a new license after WFMY-FM was deleted, an old time WFMY employee told me once.
I believe WFMY was on 97.3 to start, then was migrated to 97.1 about 1950. After the GNC shut the station down, the license was sold, but, I do not know for sure that WQMG was using that license , or a new one.
veedon's Avatar veedon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post
Yeah, they were having that big Channel 1 issue (exactly what frequencies would be channel 1 because of the FM band sitting there) that got shelved until after the war with channel 1 being deleted (hence no channel 1 in TV) and FM moving to 88-108 after all that. There is no record of WNBT ever using channel 1 or the transmitter ever being installed on channel 1. All that held up the actual commercial licenses from being issued, but the experimental licenses stayed active until the permament licenses were issued later. Same kind of thing happened with WRAL and DTV. Experimental station WRAL-HD channel 32 continued to operate until 2000 when permanent WRAL-DT channel 52 became operational. Start date of DTV was November 1, 1998.
I thought that WNBT did broadcast on Channel 1 at 50-56 MHz for a short period of time, and then after WWII the frequencies for the channels were changed, and eventually Channel 1 was removed from TV broadcasting. It was around that time that WNBT moved to Channel 4.

http://www.earlytelevision.org/stations_prewar.html
difuse's Avatar difuse
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[QUOTE=veedon;26716226]I thought that WNBT did broadcast on Channel 1 at 50-56 MHz for a short period of time, and then after WWII the frequencies for the channels were changed, and eventually Channel 1 was removed from TV broadcasting. It was around that time that WNBT moved to Channel 4.

{/QUOTE]
I thought about this a bit. Set manufacturers used a "1" designation, and the FCC used it to identify the bottom channel before WW2. But I'm not sure any stations identified with a channel number until after the post WW2 realignment. But, there is no question that channel "1" existed, and was occupied by a, RCA/NBC license in NYC. And, no question that that license had its frequency allocation moved up to the new channel 4. . .
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[quote=difuse;26731930]
Quote:
Originally Posted by veedon View Post
I thought that WNBT did broadcast on Channel 1 at 50-56 MHz for a short period of time, and then after WWII the frequencies for the channels were changed, and eventually Channel 1 was removed from TV broadcasting. It was around that time that WNBT moved to Channel 4.

{/QUOTE]
I thought about this a bit. Set manufacturers used a "1" designation, and the FCC used it to identify the bottom channel before WW2. But I'm not sure any stations identified with a channel number until after the post WW2 realignment. But, there is no question that channel "1" existed, and was occupied by a, RCA/NBC license in NYC. And, no question that that license had its frequency allocation moved up to the new channel 4. . .
That much is true and no debate there. There are no records at RCA nor NBC to prove there ever was a physical channel 1 transmitter associated with WNBT after 1941, and that is the issue. The FCC listed then with a CP and license, but no one remembers a transmitter nor is there any documentation on a physical channel 1 transmitter for WNBT. During the experimental years, RCA had transmitters on all kinds of frequencies and they may have made some test transmissions on channel 1 or very close to it, that I would believe in a minute.
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[quote=foxeng;26733690]
Quote:
Originally Posted by difuse View Post

That much is true and no debate there. There are no records at RCA nor NBC to prove there ever was a physical channel 1 transmitter associated with WNBT after 1941, and that is the issue. The FCC listed then with a CP and license, but no one remembers a transmitter nor is there any documentation on a physical channel 1 transmitter for WNBT. During the experimental years, RCA had transmitters on all kinds of frequencies and they may have made some test transmissions on channel 1 or very close to it, that I would believe in a minute.
I guess I appreciate a challenge. This discussion created one for me. Now my head hurts. But.......
Here is a WNBT program card from 1941. Magnifying , one can readily tell that the picture and sound frequencies correspond to the then NTSC channel "1" .50-56 Mc, just above the then FM band. Also, a 1945 ad for VE Day coverage, in which WNBT claims channel "1". The real evidence is that WNBT had a commercial license as of the middle of the programming described in the first pic There would seem no reason to think that WNBT moved .off that channel until the reallocation in '46 that made channel "1" a non-commercial community service channel, although RCA may have had some experimental licenses ongoing.. Even though my head hurts, if this discussion continues, we may find new material .
.
Attached: 1941_June_30_WNBT_Program.jpg (183.2 KB)  1945-Apr-20-VE-DAY-NBC-WNBT.JPG (48.2 KB) 
foxeng's Avatar foxeng
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[quote=difuse;26737746]
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post
I guess I appreciate a challenge. This discussion created one for me. Now my head hurts. But.......
Here is a WNBT program card from 1941. Magnifying , one can readily tell that the picture and sound frequencies correspond to the then NTSC channel "1" .50-56 Mc, just above the then FM band. Also, a 1945 ad for VE Day coverage, in which WNBT claims channel "1". The real evidence is that WNBT had a commercial license as of the middle of the programming described in the first pic There would seem no reason to think that WNBT moved .off that channel until the reallocation in '46 that made channel "1" a non-commercial community service channel, although RCA may have had some experimental licenses ongoing.. Even though my head hurts, if this discussion continues, we may find new material .
.
You found something that NBC says they don't have. All I know, one of the engineers from the time in an article a few years back stated there was no channel 1 transmitter and there was no documentation that showed a channel 1 broadcast before the deletion. Obviously, his memory wasn't as good as he thought it was. Since I was not around at the time, I can only go by what others who where there or in the know say.
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Experimental station WRAL-HD channel 32 continued to operate until 2000 when permanent WRAL-DT channel 52 became operational. Start date of DTV was November 1, 1998.


WRAL-HD was on Channel 32. side mount at 900' at 50Kw. We used an Andrew ALS low power TV antenna and a heavily modify Harris SIGMA transmitter. First signal on the air was July 23, 1996 (see my signature) It had an experimental license. I believe it was W32XH or W32XG, something like that. We broadcast at 1035i, not 1080i. 1035i was a Japanese system from NHK. Video was Component, Y, Pb, Pr. No HD-SDI at that time. WRAL was issued a license for channel 53, which became an out of core channel, later became channel 48 which it is today. There was only one demod in the US at that time. It was shared between WRAL, KOMO and WHD-TV (PBS, Washington, DC) FOXENG is correct on the 11/1/98 for the start of licensed stations. The 7/23/96 is considered the birth of DTV in the US.
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Originally Posted by Theo1080 View Post

WRAL-HD was on Channel 32. side mount at 900' at 50Kw. We used an Andrew ALS low power TV antenna and a heavily modify Harris SIGMA transmitter. First signal on the air was July 23, 1996 (see my signature) It had an experimental license. I believe it was W32XH or W32XG, something like that. We broadcast at 1035i, not 1080i. 1035i was a Japanese system from NHK. Video was Component, Y, Pb, Pr. No HD-SDI at that time. WRAL was issued a license for channel 53, which became an out of core channel, later became channel 48 which it is today. There was only one demod in the US at that time. It was shared between WRAL, KOMO and WHD-TV (PBS, Washington, DC) FOXENG is correct on the 11/1/98 for the start of licensed stations. The 7/23/96 is considered the birth of DTV in the US.
Yeah, I couldn't remember if it was channel 52 or 53. I know RAL had one and TVD had the other. I saw the Sigma in operation one night when SBE came to visit. Didn't that transmitter go to a station in Georgia?
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[quote=foxeng;26738322]
Quote:
Originally Posted by difuse View Post

You found something that NBC says they don't have. All I know, one of the engineers from the time in an article a few years back stated there was no channel 1 transmitter and there was no documentation that showed a channel 1 broadcast before the deletion. Obviously, his memory wasn't as good as he thought it was. Since I was not around at the time, I can only go by what others who where there or in the know say.
Could be his memory wasn't that bad. He may have arrived in the middle of the story. Had he been in service during WW2, he may well have started work with NBC after the channel change. Channel "1" was still on the chart as a community service channel. In '48, the channel was deleted, and while CPs were issued, no channel "1" ever went on the air as far as there is evidence.. So, his story was accurate, but missing a chapter, maybe.
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[quote=difuse;26741514]
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post
Could be his memory wasn't that bad. He may have arrived in the middle of the story. Had he been in service during WW2, he may well have started work with NBC after the channel change. Channel "1" was still on the chart as a community service channel. In '48, the channel was deleted, and while CPs were issued, no channel "1" ever went on the air as far as there is evidence.. So, his story was accurate, but missing a chapter, maybe.
Well, Channel 1 itself may have changed frequency ranges shortly after the war. The WNBT program card from July 5, 1941 showed frequencies around 50-56 MHz (and WCBW, which has always been Channel 2 in NYC had a higher frequency range). But in the band plan that was adopted in 1946 or thereabouts, I think the Channel 1 range extended down into the forty-something MHz frequencies.

I read something that said that very few stations (maybe none) ever actually broadcasted on the Channel 1 that was defined in 1946. But there must have been some that used the previous 50-56 MHz Channel 1 range during the period from July 1, 1941 to the introduction of the new band plan in 1946. Channel 1 was eliminated around 1948.

I wonder if any antique TV sets with a Channel 1 marking still exist. Back then, the markings might have been in MHz, similar to a radio dial, rather than channel numbers.

WNBT was called W2XBS up until it got its commercial license in July of 1941.
There is some video online of a 1949 program where WNBT was celebrating its tenth anniversary of regularly scheduled broadcasting, but it technically was still W2XBS back in 1939.

Even if WNBT was Channel 1 during the war, it may not have called itself Channel 1 on the air. (Even in that ad that is supposedly from V-E Day, Channel 1 is in much smaller print than the WNBT call letters.) It may have just emphasized the WNBT call letters on the air. I have not found any photos of WNBT using the Channel 1 branding, but if it was not Channel 1, what channel position would it have had?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by veedon View Post


I wonder if any antique TV sets with a Channel 1 marking still exist. Back then, the markings might have been in MHz, similar to a radio dial, rather than channel numbers.
1939 GE with push button tuner. 5 channels, 1-5
Attached: GE_HM-275_tuner.jpg (122.1 KB) 
amos1001's Avatar amos1001
09:19 PM Liked: 10
post #11278 of 11424
08-23-2014 | Posts: 113
Joined: Jun 2006
Here's something you guys will get a laugh out of.

Obviously nobody listened to this before it aired.

On WXII's 12-2 station, "Me-TV" Saturday night at 11, Get Smart goes off, and a promo comes on...

"Thank you North Carolina for making us America's number one all classic tv network. MeTV, WXH-TV 12 Plus."

Yes, he actually said W X H - TV. Was his script handwritten on a bar napkin? How poorly was the writing for II to look like H.

Yes, we all make mistakes. But wow.
dtv_junkie87's Avatar dtv_junkie87
09:34 PM Liked: 17
post #11279 of 11424
08-23-2014 | Posts: 153
Joined: Oct 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by amos1001 View Post
Here's something you guys will get a laugh out of.

Obviously nobody listened to this before it aired.

On WXII's 12-2 station, "Me-TV" Saturday night at 11, Get Smart goes off, and a promo comes on...

"Thank you North Carolina for making us America's number one all classic tv network. MeTV, WXH-TV 12 Plus."

Yes, he actually said W X H - TV. Was his script handwritten on a bar napkin? How poorly was the writing for II to look like H.

Yes, we all make mistakes. But wow.
Wow, that made me chuckle! But I still like that MeTV is the #1 ALL CLASSIC TV NETWORK.

Here in Dallas, our announcer (the female MeTV announcer) refers to our MeTV as "TXA 21 dot 2." Yes, KTXA is actually branded as "TXA" or "TXA 21"; this is not a mistake:

http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=KTXA

http://dfw.cbslocal.com/station/txa-21/

dtv_junkie87

P.S. Posted this while watching Svengoolie.
ejb1980's Avatar ejb1980
10:20 PM Liked: 25
post #11280 of 11424
08-23-2014 | Posts: 731
Joined: Jan 2011
It irritates me that WXII 12-2's logo bug reads METV Greensboro. WXII's COL is obviously Winston-Salem.

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