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post #11821 of 11847 Unread 08-05-2016, 12:57 PM
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Just a personal observation : I do not need any higher picture quality than what we have in OTA today. I was disappointed with NTSC for decades but am quite satisfied now..
If any improvement in PQ is indicated, it would be in resolving motion. As far as i am concerned, any new standard should include a upwardly variable field/frame rate to justify it.
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post #11822 of 11847 Unread 08-05-2016, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by difuse View Post
I'm sure OTA will be fine if there is no move to ATSC 3.X anytime soon.. That would be the killer. .
Cord cutters are not all moving to OTA.. A change in standards would cause even more viewers to forget TV as it has been..
The cord cutters I am talking to still want OTA for news and weather and live sports that they can get. The rest of the time they are happy with Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime.

There is talk within the broadcast community to take v1 stations and mux them on one or two transmitters and use other transmitters mux for v3.0. That way those who have v1 OTA sets will not lose service. You won't see the FCC helping out here, that is for sure.

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post #11823 of 11847 Unread 08-05-2016, 05:46 PM
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The article that I posted a link to in a previous message stated that with ATSC 3.0, a single RF channel could carry multiplexed programming that amounts to a "skinny bundle" of channels. If the broadcast TV industry could promote OTA as being a new and "sexy" technology and make it not sound like a relic of a bygone era, some people might even start putting up outdoor antennas once again.
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post #11824 of 11847 Unread 08-05-2016, 06:14 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
The article that I posted a link to in a previous message stated that with ATSC 3.0, a single RF channel could carry multiplexed programming that amounts to a "skinny bundle" of channels. If the broadcast TV industry could promote OTA as being a new and "sexy" technology and make it not sound like a relic of a bygone era, some people might even start putting up outdoor antennas once again.
There are quite a few cord cutters out there, as proven by the success of companies like Antennas Direct and Mohu. And Winegard and Channel Master still around. And there is a good selection of indoor antennas at Walmart. I still like basic OTA local channels, subchannels like MeTV and AntennaTV, local news, and neighboring regional stations like WBTV. I mainly view WYFF, WSPA, and WBTV, sometimes WCNC and WJZY. Very satisfied with that, and often I can get WSOC for news at night. I hope this basic local reception will continue. And like you say, there are streaming options such as Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu. So plenty to choose from.
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post #11825 of 11847 Unread 08-06-2016, 03:50 AM
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The cord cutters I am talking to still want OTA for news and weather and live sports that they can get. The rest of the time they are happy with Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime.

There is talk within the broadcast community to take v1 stations and mux them on one or two transmitters and use other transmitters mux for v3.0. That way those who have v1 OTA sets will not lose service. You won't see the FCC helping out here, that is for sure.
Yes, I understand about Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime. The potential cord cutters I know would use them to augment the ONE cable channel they watch--------so long as they have the means the 1-2 thousand dollars a year will be spent on the ONE channel........ no intervention procedures seem available to stop it.
No doubt the main commercial OTA channels could be piggy-backed on one or two ATSC 1.0 transmitters in most markets during a transition to ATSC 3. However, the sub-channels would be gone until a new, and probably fairly expensive, receiver was acquired. At that point, I think, many OTA viewers will feel, rightly or wrongly, that they have been jerked around enough, and will seek alternatives. A small number of younger viewers will support ATSC 3 but it might not be enough to keep it afloat. The US population has generally been getting older, and, naturally, somewhat jaded.,
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post #11826 of 11847 Unread 08-08-2016, 10:56 AM
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No doubt the main commercial OTA channels could be piggy-backed on one or two ATSC 1.0 transmitters in most markets during a transition to ATSC 3. However, the sub-channels would be gone until a new, and probably fairly expensive, receiver was acquired.
Not necessarily. With the updated MPEG2 encoders coming out, you can put 6 or 8 SD channels on one transmitter, and 3 HD channels on another.

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post #11827 of 11847 Unread 08-08-2016, 12:32 PM
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Not necessarily. With the updated MPEG2 encoders coming out, you can put 6 or 8 SD channels on one transmitter, and 3 HD channels on another.
Yes, possible, at least the arithmetic is possible. This can't be determined until the number of commercial services left after any repack is known........and the level of cooperation among broadcasters, proper rearward compatibility of ATSC 3 and other variables. Possible, yes, but I'm not convinced.And, I hope I am wrong.
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post #11828 of 11847 Unread 08-08-2016, 02:01 PM
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Yes, possible, at least the arithmetic is possible. This can't be determined until the number of commercial services left after any repack is known........and the level of cooperation among broadcasters, proper rearward compatibility of ATSC 3 and other variables. Possible, yes, but I'm not convinced.And, I hope I am wrong.
There is no backward compatibility with ATSC3.0 and non is planned. Broadcasters have asked manufacturers to not stop MPEG2 development just yet for that very reason.

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post #11829 of 11847 Unread 08-09-2016, 03:43 AM
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There is no backward compatibility with ATSC3.0 and non is planned. Broadcasters have asked manufacturers to not stop MPEG2 development just yet for that very reason.
I may have allowed economy of words to go too far. I meant rearward compatibility of receivers. Given the period of production of ATSC 1 chip sets it will be economically possible to have both ATSC 1 and 3 demod-decode in the same receiver..I would guess the first ATSC 3 sets will have both.
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post #11830 of 11847 Unread 08-09-2016, 01:25 PM
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Hopefully I am posting this in the right place - let me know if I'm not! The sticky seemed to point to asking here first.

I am looking for some antenna advise. Since the olympics are going on, I recently bought a cheap PVR box and dusted off my rabbit ears (link) so my wife and I could watch. I'm located in Jamestown (27282), and have issues picking up WXII (NBC) consistently which is becoming rather frustrating. TVFool shows 45.9dB of NM, and -45dB power for my address.

Being an engineer, my first thought is to just bite the bullet and install a larger antenna in the attic, but the wife limited me to looking for a smaller inexpensive indoor replacement option as a trial. I am only able to spend ~$25 (otherwise risk being told to just pay for cable), and would like something I could get ASAP since the olympics are going on now. I looked around at some options on Amazon, but having issues finding something with some directionality to help pull in that one channel. Do I really need a directional antenna to get NBC here, or would I be fine with a better omni/multi-directional antenna?

I know I am limiting myself a lot and there may not be a great option out there, but I appreciate all of the help I can get. Thanks!
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post #11831 of 11847 Unread 08-09-2016, 02:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Burdman27911 View Post
I am looking for some antenna advise. Since the olympics are going on, I recently bought a cheap PVR box and dusted off my rabbit ears (link) so my wife and I could watch. I'm located in Jamestown (27282), and have issues picking up WXII (NBC) consistently which is becoming rather frustrating. TVFool shows 45.9dB of NM, and -45dB power for my address.

!
A bowtie (folded dipole) while not real directional will probably work much better on the frequency WXII is using..Rabbit ears are OK on UHF if there is a strong signal, but a lot better for VHF, which isn't used in this market.
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post #11832 of 11847 Unread 08-09-2016, 03:21 PM
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A bowtie (folded dipole) while not real directional will probably work much better on the frequency WXII is using..Rabbit ears are OK on UHF if there is a strong signal, but a lot better for VHF, which isn't used in this market.
http://www.mcmelectronics.com/produc...FcxbhgodwpMD5A
This might work well, the only issue being where to put it and secure it.
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post #11833 of 11847 Unread 08-10-2016, 04:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Burdman27911 View Post
Being an engineer, my first thought is to just bite the bullet and install a larger antenna in the attic, but the wife limited me to looking for a smaller inexpensive indoor replacement option as a trial. I am only able to spend ~$25 (otherwise risk being told to just pay for cable), and would like something I could get ASAP since the olympics are going on now. I looked around at some options on Amazon, but having issues finding something with some directionality to help pull in that one channel. Do I really need a directional antenna to get NBC here, or would I be fine with a better omni/multi-directional antenna?
Outside is always best if you can...
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post #11834 of 11847 Unread 08-10-2016, 06:56 AM
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Originally Posted by difuse View Post
I may have allowed economy of words to go too far. I meant rearward compatibility of receivers. Given the period of production of ATSC 1 chip sets it will be economically possible to have both ATSC 1 and 3 demod-decode in the same receiver..I would guess the first ATSC 3 sets will have both.
I would hope they would do that, but I won't hold my breath. They had said at the start of DTV that they would make receivers that would be upgradable to any new software protocol as well and as we see, that didn't happen.

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post #11835 of 11847 Unread 08-10-2016, 07:03 AM
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2-bay or 4-bay UHF antenna, preferably mounted outside (even if just outside your highest window)
Use a male-male flat coax stub to feed under the closed window sash.

Before I installed my 8-bay UHF attic antenna I had a 2-bay UHF antenna with high-gain amplifier mounted on the end of my deck

With that could get most Charlotte transmitters from my location (Winston, near WFU.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Burdman27911 View Post
Hopefully I am posting this in the right place - let me know if I'm not! The sticky seemed to point to asking here first.

I am looking for some antenna advise. Since the olympics are going on, I recently bought a cheap PVR box and dusted off my rabbit ears (link) so my wife and I could watch. I'm located in Jamestown (27282), and have issues picking up WXII (NBC) consistently which is becoming rather frustrating. TVFool shows 45.9dB of NM, and -45dB power for my address.

Being an engineer, my first thought is to just bite the bullet and install a larger antenna in the attic, but the wife limited me to looking for a smaller inexpensive indoor replacement option as a trial. I am only able to spend ~$25 (otherwise risk being told to just pay for cable), and would like something I could get ASAP since the olympics are going on now. I looked around at some options on Amazon, but having issues finding something with some directionality to help pull in that one channel. Do I really need a directional antenna to get NBC here, or would I be fine with a better omni/multi-directional antenna?

I know I am limiting myself a lot and there may not be a great option out there, but I appreciate all of the help I can get. Thanks!

Last edited by ncbill; 08-10-2016 at 09:41 AM.
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post #11836 of 11847 Unread 08-10-2016, 07:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burdman27911 View Post
Hopefully I am posting this in the right place - let me know if I'm not! The sticky seemed to point to asking here first.

I am looking for some antenna advise. Since the olympics are going on, I recently bought a cheap PVR box and dusted off my rabbit ears (link) so my wife and I could watch. I'm located in Jamestown (27282), and have issues picking up WXII (NBC) consistently which is becoming rather frustrating. TVFool shows 45.9dB of NM, and -45dB power for my address.

Being an engineer, my first thought is to just bite the bullet and install a larger antenna in the attic, but the wife limited me to looking for a smaller inexpensive indoor replacement option as a trial. I am only able to spend ~$25 (otherwise risk being told to just pay for cable), and would like something I could get ASAP since the olympics are going on now. I looked around at some options on Amazon, but having issues finding something with some directionality to help pull in that one channel. Do I really need a directional antenna to get NBC here, or would I be fine with a better omni/multi-directional antenna?

I know I am limiting myself a lot and there may not be a great option out there, but I appreciate all of the help I can get. Thanks!
Being in Jamestown, I don't think you will ever get satisfactory results with an indoor rabbit ear type antenna of any kind.

When people contact me about antennas, I steer them away as best I can from indoor rabbit ear type antennas at all. Even in the attic, satisfactory reception is possible with an outside antenna. My first question would be what antenna are you using in your attic? If it is an outside directional antenna are you using a rotor on the antenna in your attic? Do you have an amplifier on the antenna? Since there are two areas that have towers, many people are opting to use two antennas combined together, one pointed towards Sauratown Mt, and one pointed down US 220/I73.

A few pages back in this thread, I outline how to setup two antennas for this purpose. The cost of using two antennas verses one antenna and a rotor is really close. If you need additional, help, this thread is a great archive and resource.

Greensboro, NC - HDTV

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Last edited by foxeng; 08-10-2016 at 08:03 AM.
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post #11837 of 11847 Unread 08-10-2016, 08:52 AM
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Thanks for all of the quick replies!

I do realize that I really should just bite the bullet and mount something outside or at the very least in the attic - unfortunately, I need to essentially do a proof of concept and get some system (including PVR etc) working to a good enough point that my wife can judge if she'd be ok staying without cable. I can get Northstate here, and getting Gigabit internet would lessen the pain for me if we had to go that route, but I still would prefer trying to stay OTA.

Currently, I do not have anything mounted in the attic. I think long-term, that's the route I would take and I'll keep in mind the 2-antenna approach - that's something I had loosely considered before, so I like that idea. Just for now I need to find something I can do with minimal effort (and no holes in the walls) until I can make a good case to keep using OTA only.

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Originally Posted by difuse View Post
http://www.mcmelectronics.com/produc...FcxbhgodwpMD5A
This might work well, the only issue being where to put it and secure it.
That one might work as a stop-gap solution. It's borderline large for trying to mount indoors, but I could possibly make it work.

If a folded dipole type antenna is all I would really need (obviously not ideal, but just for slightly better performance and picking up WXII), then I'm tempted to make something myself. If I'm reading correctly, WXII is channel 31 (573MHz), which would mean I would only need to make a 10.3" long antenna if I was making a half-wavelength folded dipole (like this). Is this a stupid idea? I would be fine purchasing what's linked above if it will be consideringly better. I just know it will be harder to hide and be a harder sell.

Thanks again!
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post #11838 of 11847 Unread 08-10-2016, 09:11 AM
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[QUOTE=Burdman27911;45954409]


If a folded dipole type antenna is all I would really need (obviously not ideal, but just for slightly better performance and picking up WXII), then I'm tempted to make something myself. If I'm reading correctly, WXII is channel 31 (573MHz), which would mean I would only need to make a 10.3" long antenna if I was making a half-wavelength folded dipole (like this). Is this a stupid idea? I would be fine purchasing what's linked above if it will be consideringly better. I just know it will be harder to hide and be a harder sell.

Thanks again![/QUOTE)
To my thinking, homemade is the best solution for your problems,. Not hard to make and easier to disguise than a pre-fab. I wish you well in .selling OTA at home.
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post #11839 of 11847 Unread 08-10-2016, 09:39 AM
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I'm afraid it would be easier for manufacturers to drop tuners altogether and simply simply sell their future 4K, 8K or whatever products as monitors.

This would allow them to consolidate their product lines (no more worrying about ATSC 1.0 vs. ATSC 3.0 vs. DVB-T/T2)

As long as no one refers to them as televisions, they'll have no problems selling them here.

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Originally Posted by difuse View Post
I may have allowed economy of words to go too far. I meant rearward compatibility of receivers. Given the period of production of ATSC 1 chip sets it will be economically possible to have both ATSC 1 and 3 demod-decode in the same receiver..I would guess the first ATSC 3 sets will have both.

Last edited by ncbill; 08-10-2016 at 09:44 AM.
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post #11840 of 11847 Unread 08-10-2016, 10:06 AM
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I would hope they would do that, but I won't hold my breath. They had said at the start of DTV that they would make receivers that would be upgradable to any new software protocol as well and as we see, that didn't happen.
'
When I made a post about digital radio a few days ago, it was about digital,not radio. Once down the digital path, there will more than likely be a new receiver every generation for broadcast anything. If a change in TV standards comes, new receivers or abandonment of broadcast reception are the only options, eventually. Rearward compatibility is possible,and desirable in new ATSC 3 receivers, but forward compatibility is almost impossible. If there was any knowing what future standards might be, it would be about as easy to put them in a receiver as to make the receiver upgradeable. ..A while back some thought the next standard would be ATSC 1 with MPEG 4 encoding. Some current sets will decode MPEG4 but it does not look likely to be adopted . Guessing probably will not work.
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post #11841 of 11847 Unread 08-10-2016, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burdman27911 View Post
Thanks for all of the quick replies!

I do realize that I really should just bite the bullet and mount something outside or at the very least in the attic - unfortunately, I need to essentially do a proof of concept and get some system (including PVR etc) working to a good enough point that my wife can judge if she'd be ok staying without cable. I can get Northstate here, and getting Gigabit internet would lessen the pain for me if we had to go that route, but I still would prefer trying to stay OTA.

Currently, I do not have anything mounted in the attic. I think long-term, that's the route I would take and I'll keep in mind the 2-antenna approach - that's something I had loosely considered before, so I like that idea. Just for now I need to find something I can do with minimal effort (and no holes in the walls) until I can make a good case to keep using OTA only.

That one might work as a stop-gap solution. It's borderline large for trying to mount indoors, but I could possibly make it work.

If a folded dipole type antenna is all I would really need (obviously not ideal, but just for slightly better performance and picking up WXII), then I'm tempted to make something myself. If I'm reading correctly, WXII is channel 31 (573MHz), which would mean I would only need to make a 10.3" long antenna if I was making a half-wavelength folded dipole (like this). Is this a stupid idea? I would be fine purchasing what's linked above if it will be consideringly better. I just know it will be harder to hide and be a harder sell.

Thanks again!
A dipole would work if you can get it high enough. If the RCA rabbit ears you linked to is what you are using, then you basically have a folded dipole now. That is what the loop is. It is the UHF part of the antenna. You don't even need the straight pieces. Those are for VHF.

If worst comes to worst, go over to Lowes Home Improvement and get you a http://www.lowes.com/pd/RCA-Outdoor-...nna/1000081309 It is a small yagi that is $42. You can put it inside and try it. If you like it, you have antenna one for your new system. Balun comes with it. It doesn't come with a pre-amp. Around here, 10-15db is all you need. Anything more and the intermod from cell towers kills the amp.

All opinions expressed (unless otherwise noted) are the posters and NOT the posters employers. The poster in NO WAY is/will speak for his employers. "Arguing with an engineer is like mud wrestling with a pig. After a couple of hours, you realize the pig likes it"
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post #11842 of 11847 Unread 08-10-2016, 02:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by difuse View Post
http://www.mcmelectronics.com/produc...FcxbhgodwpMD5A
This might work well, the only issue being where to put it and secure it.
MCM is often the lowest priced source for decent antennas from Stellar Labs. They have 2 bay, 4 bay, 8 bay, and triple boom yagi styles. Decide which may be best for your location. Use source code on home page for discount. And Walmart has cheap inline amp now sold under Onn brand, but I believe it is the same as the previous RCA version. Also the Clearstream 2V at Walmart is good antenna with UHF loops, but it is more expensive although recently reduced to $79. You may also consider Winegard Freevision from Home Depot for $34 which may work, but you may check and see if Lowe's will price match Amazon for the RCA antenna foxeng suggested. I think it may still be made by Winegard.
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post #11843 of 11847 Unread 08-11-2016, 04:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Burdman27911 View Post
Thanks for all of the quick replies!

I do realize that I really should just bite the bullet and mount something outside or at the very least in the attic - unfortunately, I need to essentially do a proof of concept and get some system (including PVR etc) working to a good enough point that my wife can judge if she'd be ok staying without cable. I can get Northstate here, and getting Gigabit internet would lessen the pain for me if we had to go that route, but I still would prefer trying to stay OTA.
We cut the cord five years ago. We literally have saved thousands and actually used the money and bought a timeshare - vacations for life. We have a DVR (homebuilt with mythtv) and Roku's and have missed nothing. Between Netflix and the free content on the Roku (including now some free shows from Food Network, DIY, HGTV on their channels) and the occasional splurge on Amazon TV, we are happy.
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post #11844 of 11847 Unread 08-12-2016, 07:21 AM
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The Lip-Sync Problem That Won’t Go Away!

There is no single fix for this one August 8, 2016
By Jim DeFilippis







LOS ANGELES—So we’ve all been there, watching a TV show and the actor’s lips are moving but the words are just not coming out at the right time. Sometimes a channel change or re-boot can fix this, but sometimes not. Frustrated, you give up on that program and ask why isn’t anyone doing anything about lip-sync problems!

To begin, let’s go back in history. Before TV, there were the movies, which originally didn’t have ‘sound,’ but did have music accompaniment. When sound was introduced, the production of sound was separate from picture. To insure that the sound matched picture, the ‘clapper’ slate was developed to provide a ‘sync’ point. Still in practice today, the ‘clap’ provides a method to insure the sound and picture are together in time.

However, when TV broadcasting started, there was no post production, and thus all programs were transmitted live, with the audio and video captured in real time and transmitted to the home without any significant path delays (some delay due to modulation and perhaps a part of a video line, but nothing significant).

Videotape recording with audio became available in the late ‘50s. One of the many attributes of videotape recording is the ability to alter the video to audio timing. However, the videotape machine design goal was to keep audio and video in time, so analog videotape machines were designed for zero offset between audio and video.

Later, digital technologies were adopted by television. The first significant digital device that affected the A/V timing was the digital frame sync. Designed to align an external video signal to a television plant, there was no thought about delaying audio. At first, the video delay was one to two frames, which means the audio led the video by about 33 to 66 mS. The ITU (BT 1359) has defined acceptable range of audio-to-video offset of +50mS to -120mS (+ means audio leads video, - audio lags video). Thus, a two-frame (66mS) delay of video is detectable.

DELAYING AUDIO
The first solution was to add fixed audio delays to match the video delay (usually two-and-a-half frames of delay) so the audio would always lag video, which is more tolerable to the viewer. This situation was satisfactory until additional digital devices came into use in television production, such as Digital Video Effects (DVE). Some DVEs have four or more frames of video delay, which definitely can cause objectionable A/V sync problems, but more troubling is when the effect was inserted or removed, causing the delay to jump in and out.

This was very evident with live interviews, where the interviewee would be taken either full frame (no effect) or in a picture-in-picture box (effect). Some productions would just add fixed audio delay but have to provide un-delayed audio for the return IFB channel to the interviewee, or sometimes the audio mixer would switch between delayed and un-delayed audio depending on the state of the effect.

But these complications were ‘behind the scenes’ and did not effect the overall distribution of the program and delivery to the consumer. Consumer analog TVs did not have frame-based digital processing and thus no significant video delay.

In professional production, A/V sync was kept in line more or less. Part of the reason for this success was that the delays were generally static and manufacturers developed frame syncs with tracking audio delays that use audio re-sampling techniques to insure zero A/V delay.

MPEG
Then MPEG happened! Digital compression works to reduce the data per frame required to represent a unique picture or sequence of pictures. This works fine for video because video is a discrete time signal, i.e., there are defined gaps in time between each successive video frame. These gaps provide the decoder with the ability to de-compress the original frame and then output the full picture sequence.

But audio is a continuous time signal, there are no regular silent gaps and thus no way to catch up with the video. Audio is compressed separately from the video and the MPEG encoder has to insure the video data packets and the audio data packets are time aligned both inside the encoder and after the multiplexer (mux). The time alignment is insured by the inclusion of timestamps called Program Time Stamps (PTS) as well as Decoded Time Stamps (DTS) within the bitstream. PTS and DTS are derived from a common System Time Clock (STC) which is a 90 kHz counter related to the video sampling clock (27 MHz).

Great! What could go wrong? Well if the transmission is essentially error and jitter free, there are no problems. This is why DVD and Blu-Ray don’t generally have a lip-sync issues except if the disc is damaged. But in the real world of broadcasting, transmissions are not error free, and frequently, some data is damaged or lost. The MPEG receiver uses transmission buffers that absorb these errors, recover the STC and lock to the local sample clock.

However, the receiver has to compensate for loss in the final decoding. In the case of video loss, either the decoder jumps ahead a frame or repeats a frame of video. The audio can’t jump forward or repeat audio samples to adjust to these timing changes, without causing objectionable audio distortions or silence. If the audio data is damaged, the decoder typically will mute and the video timing can be adjusted by dropping a frame. Over time, the video frame times and the audio frame times drift, causing some mismatch between the audio timing and video timing, typically within one video frame time (33 mS).

Ideally, when the A/V delay reaches detectable limits, the decoder should reset the buffers and start, over but most decoders don’t do this as it maybe considered more objectionable to interrupt the signal flow than correcting lip sync. That’s why picking up the remote and changing the channel and back will many times fix the A/V sync problem. The only option left for the consumer device (TV, smartphone, set-top box, etc.) is to add or drop a video frame.

IT’S EVERYWHERE
The AV problem related to compression is everywhere, even on the internet. While internet video uses a different timing synchronization—Real-time Transport Protocol, or RTP, timestamps—it does have the same problem with corrupted data and variation in packet timing delivery in the form of jitter.

The final lip-sync challenge that digital has introduced is the development of flat-panel displays. These displays have intrinsic delays due to the buffering of the video data into frame memory prior to the pixel readout. While this is typically just one or two frames of delay, the accumulated A/V delay can be perceivable and perhaps objectionable.

So what has the industry been doing to fix these digital compression issues? On the professional side, many techniques have been developed and put into practice. For off-line testing, test patterns have been developed that help line up audio and video timing (e.g. VALID). But what about in-service A/V timing measurement and correction?

In the mid ’90s, Tektronix developed a technique that inserted a watermark into the video image that represented a digital sample of the audio envelope. This technique worked fine with uncompressed or lightly compressed television signals, but was not reliable when heavy video compression was employed.

SMPTE published a standard last year (ST 2064-2015) for lip-sync measurement using video and audio signatures. Signatures are metadata elements derived from the image pixel data or audio envelope via an algorithm that insures that the signature is unique to that image or audio envelope. The origin signatures are transported with the audio and video signals and at the receive end and are compared with new signatures calculated from the received audio and video. The received signatures are then compared to the origin signatures to determine the video and audio delays. The receive device can then make delay adjustments to achieve zero A/V delay.

This SMPTE method is available for professional equipment but has not been adopted for use by the consumer products. The Consumer Technology Association (aka CEA) has a recommended practice (CEA CEB20) for consumer television products that address A/V synchronization problems and offer up best practice solutions. But in the end, the consumer product is dependent on the limitations of MPEG (and RTP) timing and synchronization techniques.

Most flat-panel displays today compensate for the video delay by delaying the audio decoding internally so that the built-in speaker audio is in time with the picture. The HDMI 1.3a specification includes the ability to allow consumer displays to declare their audio/video delay and thus compensate for display delays when using an external AV receiver.

So the good news is that the industry is engaged in fixing the problem. The bad news is that no one solution has been found that can solve every aspect of the lip-sync problem.

Jim DeFilippis is CEO of TMS Consulting, Inc., in Los Angeles. See more at his author archive.

http://www.tvtechnology.com/opinions...go-away/279183

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Viewers Stocked Up on Channel Master Antennas Ahead of Olympics

Company reports 1,200 percent increase in TV antenna sales August 12, 2016
By Michael Balderston






PHOENIX—Channel Master experienced some Olympics glory of its own prior to the opening ceremony of the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. The company announced that the weekend before the opening ceremony (July 30-31) there was a 1,200 percent increase in TV antenna sales through direct online orders.
NBC carries the Olympics and makes its coverage available for free from a television antenna. Channel Master says that with consumers seeking alternative methods to pay-TV, the public awareness of free over-the-air broadcast television is on the rise, with a clear uptick for the Olympics.
“It was clear that U.S. households without pay-TV were buying antennas to be able to watch the Olympcis,” said Coty Youtsey, president and CEO of Channel Master.
According to Channel Master, more homes use a TV antenna (24 million) then the largest pay-TV provider (Comcast, at 22.2 million).


http://www.tvtechnology.com/news/000...lympics/279234


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Originally Posted by foxeng View Post
Viewers Stocked Up on Channel Master Antennas Ahead of Olympics

Company reports 1,200 percent increase in TV antenna sales August 12, 2016
By Michael Balderston






PHOENIX—Channel Master experienced some Olympics glory of its own prior to the opening ceremony of the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. The company announced that the weekend before the opening ceremony (July 30-31) there was a 1,200 percent increase in TV antenna sales through direct online orders.
NBC carries the Olympics and makes its coverage available for free from a television antenna. Channel Master says that with consumers seeking alternative methods to pay-TV, the public awareness of free over-the-air broadcast television is on the rise, with a clear uptick for the Olympics.
“It was clear that U.S. households without pay-TV were buying antennas to be able to watch the Olympcis,” said Coty Youtsey, president and CEO of Channel Master.
According to Channel Master, more homes use a TV antenna (24 million) then the largest pay-TV provider (Comcast, at 22.2 million).


http://www.tvtechnology.com/news/000...lympics/279234

this author may , or may not, know of what he writes............................................ ..............
"In the 600-Megahertz reverse auction for broadcast TV station spectrum, the Federal Communications Commission has set an unattainable bar: An $86 billion ask for 126 MHz of frequency to then be made available for wireless use, at a value that most analysts say is only worth between $30 billion and $40 billion. The FCC ask and the market realities are far apart."..........................
http://www.multichannel.com/blog/mcn...e-dream/406589
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Auction Net Inches Over $10 Billion

Net proceeds reflect $500 million in discounts August 18, 2016
By Deborah D. McAdams






WASHINGTON—Net proceeds after round five of the TV spectrum incentive forward auction reach just over $10 billion on Thursday afternoon, the third day of bidding. The results were posted at the Federal Communications Commission auction portal after 4 p.m. ET, when the round closed. The net proceeds came in at $10.05 billion, reflecting discounts totaling $537.6 million from total proceeds of $10.6 billion. Rural wireless providers and small business receive a discount off their bids. Nineteen of the 62 bidders in the forward auction qualified for discounts.

The bidding started on Tuesday at the opening prices finalized by the commission in June, with the opening round yielding $8.49 billion in bids. Bidders are vying for blocks of TV spectrum provisionally relinquished by broadcasters in the earlier reverse auction for a total of $86.4 billion. If the forward auction does not raise $84.6 billion, plus $1.75 billion to fund broadcaster relocation and a lesser sum to pay for the auction, the process will begin again with another reverse auction seeking less spectrum. Of the 126 MHz proffered through the reverse auction, 100 MHz is on the forward auction block, with 26 MHz going to buffer zones, wireless mics and unlicensed uses. The bidding is expected to go for several more rounds before the auction either closes or starts at a lower clearing target.

The commission planned for various scenarios going into the auction with regard to how much spectrum it could clear. This clearing target is calculated by optimization software that determines how many TV stations can be repacked into a reduced amount of spectrum without exceeding an interference threshold. Bidding will recommence Friday morning.

http://www.tvtechnology.com/news/000...billion/279267

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