The end of broadcast TV - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 16 Old 09-30-2012, 05:44 PM - Thread Starter
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A blog post that you may find of interest. http://flatpaneldisplay.blogspot.com/2012/09/the-end-of-broadcast-tv.html
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post #2 of 16 Old 09-30-2012, 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian Oblivion View Post

A blog post that you may find of interest. http://flatpaneldisplay.blogspot.com/2012/09/the-end-of-broadcast-tv.html

 

 

I' d rather see the cable and satellite companies fade away and have  things go back to having broadcast TV be dominant.

Cable TV has brought many woes to society. The programming was better before cable TV became so powerful, too.

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post #3 of 16 Old 09-30-2012, 07:47 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post


I' d rather see the cable and satellite companies fade away and have  things go back to having broadcast TV be dominant.
Cable TV has brought many woes to society. The programming was better before cable TV became so powerful, too.
You obviously do not subscribe to channels such as HBO and Showtime. Their original series programming is so far ahead of Network TV it baffles the mind. Cable TV did not make network programming go downhill, network television did that injustice to themselves. That said, the competition from pay services may force the networks to better their programming or, indeed, broadcast TV is a goner....

Bobby 

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post #4 of 16 Old 09-30-2012, 08:41 PM
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People who think quality programming is the reason for the success of HBO and Showtime also think that singing ability is the reason for Katy Perry's success.

If you want quality programming, try PBS.

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post #5 of 16 Old 10-01-2012, 06:41 AM
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I had to install an OTA antenna at my in laws house for them b/c comcast has overcompressed the signals of many of the local stations so much that the picture is beyond unwatchable, its a completely pixelated mess

so yes, it is cable that has become obsolete, we now get for free what the cable cos want to charge us up the wazoo for, and thats why plants like brian joined and used its very first post linking to blogs trying to desensitize the public to the FCCs spectrum grab. and its not just here that theyre trying to "blog it out", ive seen on it other boards as well.

mods the OP is in violation is it not?
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post #6 of 16 Old 10-01-2012, 08:07 AM
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Can't believe how much obvious BS is in that article.
Obviously written by a blogger who has a problem with the concept of free over-the-air broadcasting.

Ken English, Sr. Engineer, KSL-TV.
"The postings on this site are my own and don't necessarily represent the Company positions, strategies or opinions."
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post #7 of 16 Old 10-07-2012, 10:25 AM
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Two mistakes immediately appeared:

1) The RCA-NTSC standard did not delay the introduction of color TV by ten years by any stretch of the imagination. If it did so at all, it would have been less than three years (de-facto launch 1954 instead of 1951). In reality, it was not a factor at all. CBS field-sequential color was already killed off by the millions of 525/60i black-and-white sets sold to and put into use by the public in 1950 and 1951. If CBS were ready with its 405/144i system before about 1948, it may have been viable, but, by 1951, an incompatible standard was out of the question. The other 11 years in the delay to color TV being "mass market" was the "chicken and egg" problem. Networks would not pay for color TV broadcasts to B&W sets, and people were not going to buy color TV sets (at half a years' house payments!) to watch B&W programs.

2) The myth of "seldom used" OTA television. Is Time Warner Cable obsolete? Bright House? Dish Network? All have fewer users than OTA! Since OTA does not keep a subscriber list, its usage is likely underestimated. Many homes have secondary sets on OTA, others may use OTA for HD or out-of-market stations even though they have cable, and people use OTA at work.
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post #8 of 16 Old 10-08-2012, 06:53 AM
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The Electronic Industries Association (EIA, now calling itself the CEA) used to keep very extensive data on TV set sales and pricing. They disposed of the data when it became an anti-trust violation for trade associations to maintain tht type of database. If itsthemultipath has access to another data source, I would be beneficial if he would publish his source as the EIA database can only be referred to from the memories of those that maintained or used it prior to its destruction. However the EIA database showed that there were no significant color TV sales, certainly not millions, until the early 1960's when the pricing fell to $400. That $400 is almost $3,000 in today's money.

As to the utility of over the air broadcast, no one doubts that it is still important for some users. It became much less useful for rural users when the transition was made to a digital signal. With the old Analog, rural users could still get a signal, albeit a bad signal, at very long distances. With the digital signal, the fall of in quality is quite sharp hence some that are closer to the brodcast get a much better signal, and some that were further away now get no signal at all. Beyond this, as mentioned in the article, the FCC has several billion dollars to ensure that all households have an internet connection by 2020. Though the FCC will not reach this goal, increasing internet availability, increasing internet content (including ad supported content) and the inevitability of all new TVs coming with an on-board internet connection spell a steady decline in the the numbers served by broadcast and a steady rise in the value of the broadcast spectrum.
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post #9 of 16 Old 10-10-2012, 09:03 PM
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Ed Reitan's color TV history website had (or has) year-by-year production figures for RCA's early color sets, but I can't find that list on his site now. You were right, it was not millions, nowhere near, leading some to declare color TV a marketplace flop (my reference to "millions" was to the number of black & white sets sold in the early 1950's, and there were).

If I remember correctly, it (RCA color set sales) was something like 100,000/year in 1955 and 1956, cooling down to more like 40,000/year in 1958 and 1959. It began to climb back in 1961 (less expensive sets and a rapidly-rising standard of living were certainly a factor, but TV fans also point to the popularity of Bonanza and Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color).

By 1964 it was about 1,000,000 and in 1965 it just went nuts.
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post #10 of 16 Old 10-11-2012, 12:21 PM
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If I remember correctly the 1965 (64/65) TV season was the first that most of the ABC, CBS, and NBC primetime shows were all in color explaining why the sales of color TVs went nuts in 1965.
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post #11 of 16 Old 10-11-2012, 02:49 PM
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This discussion brought back the memory all of the color recorded (video Tape) 13 lines visable with grest clarity. Everybody wondering why their set was broken when it wasn't.
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post #12 of 16 Old 10-11-2012, 02:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenglish View Post

Can't believe how much obvious BS is in that article.
Obviously written by a blogger who has a problem with the concept of free over-the-air broadcasting.

+1
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post #13 of 16 Old 10-11-2012, 05:20 PM
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For those that don't watch over-the-air TV - keep in mind the presence of the over-the-air channels is keeping cable / satellite bills from going completely over the top. There is still the option to "cut the cord". If over-the-air completely went away, the cable / satellite operators would have a captive market - either pay us - or stop watching TV. Every popular channel would also have reason to raise the per-subscriber, per-month charge.

Internet TV? Most folks only can get useable internet access from the cable provider.
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post #14 of 16 Old 10-13-2012, 09:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Sammer View Post

If I remember correctly the 1965 (64/65) TV season was the first that most of the ABC, CBS, and NBC primetime shows were all in color explaining why the sales of color TVs went nuts in 1965.

It was the 65/66 season. Relatively few monochrome stragglers that season (including Addams Family, Munsters and The Fugitive - in each of these, black-and-white may have been kept for the mood of the show). Some shows, including Gilligan's Island and Bewitched, flipped from B&W to color.
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post #15 of 16 Old 10-14-2012, 08:16 AM
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If over-the-air went away, and wasn't replaced with the same equivalent free streaming over the Internet, it is going to hurt the programming providers/distributors much more than it will me.
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post #16 of 16 Old 10-14-2012, 09:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsthemultipath! View Post

It was the 65/66 season. Relatively few monochrome stragglers that season (including Addams Family, Munsters and The Fugitive - in each of these, black-and-white may have been kept for the mood of the show). Some shows, including Gilligan's Island and Bewitched, flipped from B&W to color.

I don't have mastery of the details, but a decade ago, I participated in another thread in which a knowledgeable TV junkie said that one year, two networks required all prime time shows to be in color, and the third network had made its similar edict the year immediately before, and that only two shows were allowed to run in black and white for one more year than were the rest of them on their network - I Dream of Genie and one other - and the reason Genie was given a "stay" was that its producers claimed they didn't have the capability of doing their special effects in color.

Update: I now see that NBC had attempted to be the first to have an all-color prime time lineup, and in 1965-1966, its only B&W shows starting the season were I Dream of Genie and Convoy, but many affiliates refused to air Convoy because it was in black and white and so it was dropped after just 13 episodes. Its producers felt they couldn't handle the increased cost of color production because it relied on a lot of stock footage that had already been shot in black and white. CBS and ABC seem to have issued their color-only edicts for the 1966-1967 season.

The Fugitive did poorly in reruns, in part because it was mostly shot in black in white, but I suspect also because it was such a slow show, with Dr. Kimball ambling from one town to another, waiting for the next clue to surface, whereas the movie version of that theme was a frantically paced chase story. It is a shame that The Dick Van Dyke show was shot in black and white because it is the beginning of the modern sitcom, but most young people never watched it in reruns because it was in black and white. And there is a generation of re-run viewers who never discovered that Ernie started out as a next door neighbor to the Douglas family. Disney stalwart Tim Considine played eldest brother Mike for the first five years of My Three Sons, which were shot in black and white and which were not included in the original re-run package.

The color TVs of the early to mid 1960s disappointed a lot of people. I remember that our first one had level controls for the three colors that we would have to adjust from show to show, and those TVs were followed by models that had a color "tilt", from red to green, and a separate color level adjustment. The common refrain of non-buyers of that era is that they would wait until the bugs were worked out before buying. For most families I knew, the first color TV was bought only after it was determined that the family car would last one more year.
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