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post #17461 of 17490 Old 09-19-2014, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Ednixon1 View Post
KVNV channel 3 in New York is trying for an October 1, 2014 sign on date. If you look at the TV tower on the very top of the 52 story Conde Nast building at 4 Times Square and there is still a yellow gin pole alongside the new Jampro / AB Dick circularly polarized channel 3 antenna on top, then they won't be on the air. The construction jin pole is still up, today, Friday Sept. 19. The website for KVNV 3 and it's sister station KJWP 2 in Philadelphia is PMCM TV dot com
There are two transmitters ready to go. To differentiate the 720p HD signal from an overlapping coverage area with channel 3 in Hartford, CN
KVNV 3 will be using psip ID 3.10 for it's primary HD channel rather than the usual 3.1.

meTV hopes to be originating actual native HD programming on this station rather than the upconverted 480p on KJWP 2.
This will be shows that were shot on film and scanned into HD, such as Hogan's Heroes, which was done for HD net years ago.
We are awaiting the HDTV network downlink gear for that. It will be a new network launch, meTV HD.
A photo of the antenna atop 4 Times Square with yellow construction gin pole in place is attached.
Please stand by, we hope you can get the 7KW ERP channel 3 in October.
thanks for the feedback. you said we a few times there, do you work at PMCM? hope you do meet your new launch date.

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post #17462 of 17490 Old 09-20-2014, 06:18 PM
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thanks for the feedback. you said we a few times there, do you work at PMCM? hope you do meet your new launch date.
I highly doubt they will be online Oct 1. Kvnv employee has said they won't come on for at least three months. Don't get your hopes up high
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post #17463 of 17490 Old 09-21-2014, 01:00 AM
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Exclamation PMCM TV, LLC. Is 100% Within It's Legal Rights

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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
I like the proposal. It allows the new KVNV to be Channel 3 for all of its OTA viewers while still allowing WFSB and KYW to be Channel 3 both OTA and on cable systems in areas where those stations have historically marketed themselves as Channel 3.

The main objection will likely be that some OTA viewers could be misled into thinking that the KVNV feeds on 3.10, 3.11, etc. are subchannels belonging to station WFSB or subchannels belonging to station KYW. This could be remedied by requiring all of the stations to do station identification announcements (on all of their subchannels) that announce the call letters and maybe even announce the company that owns the station. (Wouldn't it be nice to know what company is responsible for the station?)
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Originally Posted by nyctveng View Post
(uhfyagi's) proposal is quite ridiculous...actually f***ing ridiculous. The KVNV/WFSB issue is very isolated. You don't go write new rules and screw with stations that have been on the air with a channel identity for decades to please a new station that is able to go on the air due to a loophole. It is great for the market that a new station is coming but not at the expense of displacing those that have been here.

The proposal of using 3.10+ PSIP sounds fair.
Meredith Corporation overextended themselves by complaining about PMCM TV's PSIP. While I agree that some sort of compromise is helpful - and I think that compromise exists in PMCM's proposal to not seek a channel 3 assignment on Fairfield County, CT. pay TV systems - the reality is that the majority of viewers in this region have been and will be watching these stations via a pay TV service provider. Initially, many observers thought that Meredith's objections were based on this premise, specifically that the right of WFSB to request channel 3 carriage from area MVPDs would be endangered. But as we can now see through FCC filings, this was likely not the case.

I have no objection to PMCM TV's proposal with respect to both it's OTA and retransmitted signal via the regional MVPDs that serve the New York, NY and Fairfield, CT. television markets, except that I strongly feel the portion of that proposal concerning the OTA signal of KVNV is unnecessary.

PMCM TV, by their actions, in no way attempted to displace or interfere with any existing television station. It is important to note that the only objections to KVNV raised have been those by the licensee of a television station that operates outside of KVNV's present or future market.

I encourage anyone interested in this matter to read through the numerous pleadings and exhibits attached thereto filed by all interested parties with the FCC. I'll forewarn: they are quite lengthy. I have read through them, and I've reached this conclusion:

PMCM TV is 100% within its legal rights to both identify its OTA signal as channel 3-1 AND, as a station electing must-carry status, to demand carriage from any MVPD operating within its signal contour on channel 3.

The term "virtual interference", as referenced numerous times by Meredith, is both alien to and absent from the FCC's rules. Prior to its "Alternate PSIP Proposal", PMCM TV sought a compromise in which it would forego its statutory right to seek channel 3 carriage on those MVPDs within Fairfield, CT; apparently that earlier compromise was unsatisfactory to Meredith. Additionally, PMCM TV has noted where, pursuant to statute, every U.S. state - including New Jersey - MUST be served by a commercial VHF television station. To that end, New Jersey has been deprived of this right since June 2009 when WWOR-TV Secaucus signed-off its channel 9 signal, and the constant meritless objections raised by Meredith (licensee of a CONNECTICUT station that operates outside of the New York market) could conceivably deprive New Jersey of it's right to enjoy a commercial VHF television station for potentially years to come should the matter continue in litigation.

The following links direct to the various filings. Incidentally, the July 17, 2014 letter attaches material from AVS forum member Trip Ericson's website http://www.rabbitears.info/ as an exhibit. All pleadings filed with respect to this matter are found within the Correspondence Folder section "Imported Letters"

FCC: KVNV Correspondence Folder: http://licensing.fcc.gov/cgi-bin/ws.exe/prod/cdbs/pubacc/prod/corrp_list.pl?Facility_id=86537

FCC: KVNV Imported Letter - July 17, 2014: http://licensing.fcc.gov/cgi-bin/pro...etter_id=50985

FCC: KVNV Imported Letter - July 28, 2014: http://licensing.fcc.gov/cgi-bin/pro...etter_id=52509
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post #17464 of 17490 Old 09-21-2014, 05:13 AM
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[Disclaimer: While I do work for the FCC, I do not work on this type of issue. My comments are my own personal opinion and are not necessarily representative of the FCC, its commissioners, or staff. My comments are also not legal advice.)

But the FCC adopted ATSC A/65C to manage PSIP, and adopted it in full. (See 73.682(d).) Annex B makes only a minor reference to markets, but is stated explicitly to apply to overlap in digital service areas, which the areas of WFSB and KVNV most certainly do overlap. Further, it specifically makes reference to major channel numbers (the 3 in 3-1). Of course, the regulations also don't assume a license will be moved from 3,000 miles away and have an existing conflicting virtual channel, which makes them somewhat unclear in this case. But I think WFSB is on much firmer legal ground than KVNV is here. When the FCC was going through their rulemaking to assign 4 to Atlantic City and 5 to Seaford (now Dover), Fox complained about potential overlap between what is now WMDE and their WTTG, and the FCC clearly stated that whoever signed on the channel 5 allotment would have to use virtual channel 36. If Meredith is complaining here about the same thing for the same reason, I don't see how you can treat this situation differently from that one.

Additionally,, while there are plenty of places where PSIP overlaps, the idea that no conflict exists is only anecdotal. I've seen plenty of instances where conflicting PSIP causes one station or the other to not be received on certain receivers. If you want people to receive your signal over the air with an antenna, then the virtual channels should not overlap. The 3-10 proposal prevents that, but I have to agree that it limits the rights of WFSB in a way that other stations are not limited (what if WFSB decides they want to put up a channel on 3-10?) and could create confusion that KVNV on 3-10 is commonly owned with or controlled by WFSB.

Because the regulation really does not anticipate this specific situation at all, I would argue the 14-1 proposal made the most sense, though a strict reading of the regulation does lead me to the conclusion that 33-1 is also valid. If I were the one making the decision, 14-1 is the path I would choose.

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post #17465 of 17490 Old 09-21-2014, 08:02 AM
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If KVNV were to use a virtual channel number other than 3, such as 14, wouldn't that mean that it could not demand carriage on channel 3 on the cable systems? That's what the real fight is about. What virtual channel number a station uses for OTA transmissions is of lesser importance. Being right near WCBS and other local stations on a cable system could make a difference in how profitable KVNV is able to be.

Even leaving aside the confusion created by the difference between physical channels and virtual channels, the regulation of OTA is just messed up because the rules have not been brought fully into the digital age. The rules are so out of date and need to be revised. Why should stations nowadays have to pay a higher fee for a VHF allocation? VHF was better than UHF in the old days (getting a VHF allocation was a big deal for WNET), but that is no longer true.
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post #17466 of 17490 Old 09-21-2014, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Giacomo Siffredi View Post
... Additionally, PMCM TV has noted where, pursuant to statute, every U.S. state - including New Jersey - MUST be served by a commercial VHF television station. To that end, New Jersey has been deprived of this right since June 2009 when WWOR-TV Secaucus signed-off its channel 9 signal, and the constant meritless objections raised by Meredith (licensee of a CONNECTICUT station that operates outside of the New York market) could conceivably deprive New Jersey of it's right to enjoy a commercial VHF television station for potentially years to come should the matter continue in litigation.

...

I wonder when that statute was passed. That's an example of an old law that needs to be revised in light of new technology. Maybe the statute should be repealed and just let the FCC have full authority over channel allocations. Congress could always step in again if it felt that it needed to intervene, but it's usually better to leave decisions like that to the people who are experts in the technology.

I'm pretty sure that very few OTA viewers are clamoring for more signals on VHF-Lo.
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post #17467 of 17490 Old 09-21-2014, 08:38 AM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
I wonder when that statute was passed. That's an example of an old law that needs to be revised in light of new technology. Maybe the statute should be repealed and just let the FCC have full authority over channel allocations. Congress could always step in again if it felt that it needed to intervene, but it's usually better to leave decisions like that to the people who are experts in the technology.
The law was passed in the 80s. WOR in New York was about to lose its license (I forget why) and went to Congress. In a great bit of evidence that Congress has always been just as bad as it is now about big business, they passed this law that said if a station requested to move to another state to become its only commercial VHF signal, its license would automatically regardless of any other issues that license may have had. The law passed, WOR requested a move to Secaucus, NJ, and the license was retained. Then, 20 years later, it was used for only the second time in its history for KVNV and KJWP.

- Trip

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post #17468 of 17490 Old 09-21-2014, 04:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Trip in VA View Post
The law was passed in the 80s. WOR in New York was about to lose its license (I forget why) and went to Congress. In a great bit of evidence that Congress has always been just as bad as it is now about big business, they passed this law that said if a station requested to move to another state to become its only commercial VHF signal, its license would automatically regardless of any other issues that license may have had. The law passed, WOR requested a move to Secaucus, NJ, and the license was retained. Then, 20 years later, it was used for only the second time in its history for KVNV and KJWP.

- Trip
RKO / Genereal Tire was the owner of WOR-TV, and was under pressure from the FCC to divest itself of its broadcast properties for reasons that do not need explanation here. They were force to sell KHJ-TV and WNAC-TV before NJ Senator Bill Bradley passes the aformetioned law. RKO / GT was able to retain WOR-TV for a while longer as a result of the law, but eventually sold to MCA in 1986 or 87, and the calls were changed to WWOR-TV.
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post #17469 of 17490 Old 09-21-2014, 06:14 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
Maybe the statute should be repealed and just let the FCC have full authority over channel allocations. Congress could always step in again if it felt that it needed to intervene, but it's usually better to leave decisions like that to the people who are experts in the technology.
In that case, the LAST group of people those decisions should be left to would be the FCC

(no offense intended to Trip)
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post #17470 of 17490 Old 09-21-2014, 07:30 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
I'm pretty sure that very few OTA viewers are clamoring for more signals on VHF-Lo.
Especially any OTA viewers who even understand the difference between VHF-Lo and VHF-Hi, or even VHF and UHF. But for those who do understand the technology, you would be correct. Unfortunately, with an incentive spectrum auction looming, the six VHF-Lo channels may gain more broadcaster occupants.

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Originally Posted by Trip in VA View Post
The law was passed in the 80s. WOR in New York was about to lose its license (I forget why) and went to Congress. In a great bit of evidence that Congress has always been just as bad as it is now about big business, they passed this law that said if a station requested to move to another state to become its only commercial VHF signal, its license would automatically regardless of any other issues that license may have had. The law passed, WOR requested a move to Secaucus, NJ, and the license was retained. Then, 20 years later, it was used for only the second time in its history for KVNV and KJWP.

- Trip
This is correct. But anyone trying to ascertain the rationale for this law must understand the media environment that existed in the early 1980s: AM radio still provided full-service programming, and the proof existed in Arbitron ratings in which AM stations ranked high within the targeted demographics. FM radio was just starting to emerge as a technically superior alternative, especially for music-oriented formats. Cable penetration was significantly less than what it is today (in fact, some areas within the New York metro weren't even wired). VHF was technically superior for OTA viewers, especially those who even had an external UHF tuner, let alone a television with a self-contained UHF tuner. Does anyone remember those manual UHF tuners that merely turned like a fine-tuning knob and did not click onto each individual station between 14 and 83? People subscribed to paper newspapers. There was no internet. There were no smartphones.

With respect to OTA television: New Jersey did have it's own government-subsidized television network, New Jersey Network (the present-day WNET-operated NJTV), which broadcasted on four UHF channels. Through these four channels, the network provided full coverage throughout the state. But again, this was a UHF-only network, and thus had a significant disadvantage in reaching viewers in the early 1980s.

New Jersey had - and to some extent still has - a unique disadvantage with respect to its geographic location and media coverage. New Jersey, being sandwiched between two major cities, each having its own media market, has often lived within the shadows of Philadelphia and New York City. This has resulted in depreciated media coverage by Philadelphia and New York City television stations of news within New Jersey. In fact, last year, the news director of WPIX made a decision to only cover news that occurred within the five boroughs of NYC, thus excluding Long Island and New Jersey; That decision was later reversed.

In the early 1980s, the OTA-only audience in New Jersey (which at that time was significantly larger than today) was in need of a free New Jersey-oriented television outlet, and this need was prominently addressed by (or exploited by) RKO/General Tire and NJ Senator Bill Bradley.

Initially, it was a good thing. New studios were built in Secaucus, NJ. which brought temporary and permanent jobs into the state and allowed for programming to be produced within NJ. Original programming included: 9 Broadcast Plaza; People Are Talking; a 12Noon and 10PM newscast, each one-hour; The Morton Downey, Jr. Show; The Howard Stern Show; among others.

Unfortunately for New Jersey, the subsequent sale of WWOR-TV to FOX in 2000 would begin an era in which New Jersey-centric programming would take a back-seat to FOX's real intent for the station: being a bastard step-child to WNYW. On June 12, 2009, WWOR-TV signed off of VHF channel 9 with a decision to keep its OTA signal on pre-transition UHF channel 38. That decision would technically deprive New Jersey of a commercial VHF television station, despite the fact that WWOR-TV uses virtual channel 9-1 through PSIP.
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post #17471 of 17490 Old 09-22-2014, 04:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Giacomo Siffredi View Post
... But anyone trying to ascertain the rationale for this law must understand the media environment that existed in the early 1980s: AM radio still provided full-service programming, and the proof existed in Arbitron ratings in which AM stations ranked high within the targeted demographics. FM radio was just starting to emerge as a technically superior alternative, especially for music-oriented formats. Cable penetration was significantly less than what it is today (in fact, some areas within the New York metro weren't even wired). VHF was technically superior for OTA viewers, especially those who even had an external UHF tuner, let alone a television with a self-contained UHF tuner. Does anyone remember those manual UHF tuners that merely turned like a fine-tuning knob and did not click onto each individual station between 14 and 83? ...

With respect to OTA television: New Jersey did have it's own government-subsidized television network, New Jersey Network (the present-day WNET-operated NJTV), which broadcasted on four UHF channels. Through these four channels, the network provided full coverage throughout the state. But again, this was a UHF-only network, and thus had a significant disadvantage in reaching viewers in the early 1980s.

...

Initially, it was a good thing.... The Morton Downey, Jr. Show; The Howard Stern Show; among others.
Downey and Stern were good things? There's no accounting for tastes, I guess.

As for UHF in the early 1980's, if viewers were having difficulty receiving the signals, it was probably because the transmitters were located too far away or did not have enough power. It certainly was not due to a scarcity of UHF tuners. In fact, I think the government required sometime in the sixties that all sets sold in the U.S. have built-in UHF tuners.
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post #17472 of 17490 Old 09-22-2014, 05:49 PM
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Downey and Stern were good things? There's no accounting for tastes, I guess.

.
Those shows may not have appealed to all but locally produced content that creates local jobs and supports local businesses is/was a good thing
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post #17473 of 17490 Old 09-22-2014, 10:12 PM
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Downey and Stern were good things? There's no accounting for tastes, I guess.

As for UHF in the early 1980's, if viewers were having difficulty receiving the signals, it was probably because the transmitters were located too far away or did not have enough power. It certainly was not due to a scarcity of UHF tuners. In fact, I think the government required sometime in the sixties that all sets sold in the U.S. have built-in UHF tuners.
5 megawatt power for uhf station is low power? the tuners on sets back on 80's had a lot of noise to start with something in the 10db range, most stations had more than enough power , I use to regularly received stations over 100 miles away with uhf antenna back in analog days. there is no doubt back then; stations were powerhouses compare to whats on now. on vhf you could've receive stations even further than uhf. 200 miles was not out unheard of.

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post #17474 of 17490 Old 09-23-2014, 02:50 AM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
As for UHF in the early 1980's, if viewers were having difficulty receiving the signals, it was probably because the transmitters were located too far away or did not have enough power. It certainly was not due to a scarcity of UHF tuners. In fact, I think the government required sometime in the sixties that all sets sold in the U.S. have built-in UHF tuners.
This is correct. The All-Channel Receiver Act of 1962 (ACRA) (47 U.S.C. § 303(s)), commonly known as the All-Channels Act, was passed by the United States Congress in 1961, to allow the Federal Communications Commission to require that all television set manufacturers must include UHF tuners, so that new UHF-band TV stations (then channels 14 to 83) could be received by the public. Under the All-Channel Receiver Act, FCC regulations would ensure that all new TV sets sold in the U.S. after 1964 had built-in UHF tuners.

BUT... again you have to remember the media environment in the early 1980s. Many people owned color televisions which they paid hundreds of dollars for - and probably paid to have repaired at least once - that were approaching twenty years old. In some cases, owners hesitated to replace them until it was absolutely necessary due to them being built into cabinetry as consoles, and was thus considered amongst the room's furniture. Some of the more expensive console units included a Hi-Fi AM/FM radio and Turntable.

Just as we have recently experienced with ATSC tuners, the earlier generation of NTSC UHF tuners were not as sensitive and therefore may not have received distant or weaker signals as capably as succeeding generation NTSC UHF tuners.

And because the majority of viewers had already established viewing patterns that revolved around VHF signals, thanks to the majority of major network signals operating on VHF for several decades already, buying a new television for the lone purpose of obtaining a better UHF tuner was an expense most casual viewers were unwilling to make.

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5 megawatt power for uhf station is low power? the tuners on sets back on 80's had a lot of noise to start with something in the 10db range, most stations had more than enough power , I use to regularly received stations over 100 miles away with uhf antenna back in analog days. there is no doubt back then; stations were powerhouses compare to whats on now. on vhf you could've receive stations even further than uhf. 200 miles was not out unheard of.
Very true. Plenty of UHF television stations in that era did not spare any wattage to transmit their signals, and when compared with the average wattage used today, it was significantly more back then.

Regarding the interference, while many of those CRTs circa 1960s and 1970s were well constructed, it is true that noise levels within their inner components were distastefully high. In some cases, this was usually due to poorly insulated transformers or aging/malfunctioning tubes. In the case of televisions which had both the original 300Ω and newer coaxial 75Ω RF inputs, signal leakage was more common than realized as a direct result of having two inputs, because the unused (and generally not terminated) input picked up errant signals which caused spurious RF interference.

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Downey and Stern were good things? There's no accounting for tastes, I guess.
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Those shows may not have appealed to all but locally produced content that creates local jobs and supports local businesses is/was a good thing
Yes, it is/was not only a good thing, it is/was an excellent thing.

And with respect to stations operating in the New York market, that local connection between television and the communities it serves has really been strained over the past two decades. Pardon me if I don't look upon the 60-second "community calendar" segments featured on Saturday morning local newscasts as a true local connection.

Content notwithstanding, the locally produced shows on WWOR-TV were not elaborately produced nor ostentatious. It was apparent to the audience that these shows were not produced to compete with the station's New York City licensed counterparts; their intent, rather, was to reflect the New Jersey local communities and establish a connection with them. The station, as a result, was more accessible to local businesses and organizations. As I see it, this station in the 1980s era was doing more to serve its COL and surrounding region than present regulations allow for.

The deterioration of this station's original commitment to the communities it serves is a direct consequence of the short-sighted provisions of the deregulation of the industry, which effectively allowed big corporate to license as much of the public airwaves as possible and disregard the original intentions of the broadcasting license, save for technical regulations for operation of the transmitter plant and programming E/I requirements.
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post #17475 of 17490 Old 09-23-2014, 05:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Giacomo Siffredi View Post
BUT... again you have to remember the media environment in the early 1980s. Many people owned color televisions which they paid hundreds of dollars for - and probably paid to have repaired at least once - that were approaching twenty years old. In some cases, owners hesitated to replace them until it was absolutely necessary due to them being built into cabinetry as consoles, and was thus considered amongst the room's furniture. Some of the more expensive console units included a Hi-Fi AM/FM radio and Turntable.

Just as we have recently experienced with ATSC tuners, the earlier generation of NTSC UHF tuners were not as sensitive and therefore may not have received distant or weaker signals as capably as succeeding generation NTSC UHF tuners.

And because the majority of viewers had already established viewing patterns that revolved around VHF signals, thanks to the majority of major network signals operating on VHF for several decades already, buying a new television for the lone purpose of obtaining a better UHF tuner was an expense most casual viewers were unwilling to make.
And in New York City, where you had seven VHF Stations, the need for a UHF tuner was truly minimized. Many cities only had three (maybe four) VHF stations. New York did not have a need for UHF tuners like Scranton, PA, or even Boston or Philadelphia, where you had independent stations on UHF.

Quote:
Yes, it is/was not only a good thing, it is/was an excellent thing.

And with respect to stations operating in the New York market, that local connection between television and the communities it serves has really been strained over the past two decades. Pardon me if I don't look upon the 60-second "community calendar" segments featured on Saturday morning local newscasts as a true local connection.

Content notwithstanding, the locally produced shows on WWOR-TV were not elaborately produced nor ostentatious. It was apparent to the audience that these shows were not produced to compete with the station's New York City licensed counterparts; their intent, rather, was to reflect the New Jersey local communities and establish a connection with them. The station, as a result, was more accessible to local businesses and organizations. As I see it, this station in the 1980s era was doing more to serve its COL and surrounding region than present regulations allow for.

The deterioration of this station's original commitment to the communities it serves is a direct consequence of the short-sighted provisions of the deregulation of the industry, which effectively allowed big corporate to license as much of the public airwaves as possible and disregard the original intentions of the broadcasting license, save for technical regulations for operation of the transmitter plant and programming E/I requirements.
Just look at children's programming back inthe 70's...

WNEW-TV had "Wonderama"
WOR-TV had "Romper Room"
WPIX-TV had "The Magic Garden"

You don't see that type of local production for children's television nowadays.... But that stems from the choices available for children's programming today as compared to 30+ years ago... and how can you locally produce a show that airs on TV at a given time and compete with a DVD?

Cheers!
-Doug
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post #17476 of 17490 Old 09-23-2014, 06:25 AM
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You don't see that type of local production for children's television nowadays.... But that stems from the choices available for children's programming today as compared to 30+ years ago... and how can you locally produce a show that airs on TV at a given time and compete with a DVD?

Cheers!
-Doug
DVD? whats a DVD? what child knows what a DVD is? you're showing your age my 3 year old can navigate Netflix Kids and Hulu+ Kids like a pro.

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post #17477 of 17490 Old 09-23-2014, 07:23 AM
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And in New York City, where you had seven VHF Stations, the need for a UHF tuner was truly minimized. Many cities only had three (maybe four) VHF stations. New York did not have a need for UHF tuners like Scranton, PA, or even Boston or Philadelphia, where you had independent stations on UHF.



Just look at children's programming back inthe 70's...

WNEW-TV had "Wonderama"
WOR-TV had "Romper Room"
WPIX-TV had "The Magic Garden"

You don't see that type of local production for children's television nowadays.... But that stems from the choices available for children's programming today as compared to 30+ years ago... and how can you locally produce a show that airs on TV at a given time and compete with a DVD?

Cheers!
-Doug
Yes TV shows that air at set times can't compete with DVD or online streaming however those shows need to be produced somewhere. Better here in the NYC Metro than say L.A. I personally hate shows most of the daytime talk shows produced in NYC but again better here than elsewhere. Straying off topic but L.A. voted in a law that requires adult film actors to wear protection and that has sent the whole industry to other parts of the country.
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post #17478 of 17490 Old 09-23-2014, 06:14 PM
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Locally produced programming has been in decline for a long time, except for news shows. WGN in Chicago kept the Bozo the Clown children's show going for many years, and I guess WOR had some similar programming, but by the late 70's most independent stations had switched over to stuff like Speed Racer and Ultra Man. There was no profit to be made in doing locally produced shows.

I don't know exactly when the first solid state sets came out, but I would think that if somebody had an old vacuum tube model from the early 60's or even earlier, then there would have been an incentive to upgrade to a solid state model sometime in the 70's, especially if the old set was B&W and the new one would be a color set.

That leads me to wonder. The analog sets used to routinely last 15 years or more.
What is the life expectancy for one of today's flat panel HDTV's?
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post #17479 of 17490 Old 09-24-2014, 05:08 AM
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I don't know exactly when the first solid state sets came out, but I would think that if somebody had an old vacuum tube model from the early 60's or even earlier, then there would have been an incentive to upgrade to a solid state model sometime in the 70's, especially if the old set was B&W and the new one would be a color set.
Not to mention the other changes in television technology:

IR remote control
Digital Tuning

Even then, the old set was typically handed down to kids or put in the rec room / den / basement.

Quote:
That leads me to wonder. The analog sets used to routinely last 15 years or more.
What is the life expectancy for one of today's flat panel HDTV's?
I had a 19" Sylvania set that I was given in 1984. It lasted until 2006. It still had a phenomenal picture when it bit the dust.

I think today's Flat Panels are lucky to last 5 years, especially with the cheap capacitors they are constructed with. I actually wonder how many FP's are thrown away instead of getting a board replaced / recapped.... Of course it will depend how often the set is used...
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post #17480 of 17490 Old 09-24-2014, 06:46 AM
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How About 10 Years!

I have a heavily used sharp Aquas 1080i LCD TV that's about 10 years old and still works great. In fact it is superior in sound to any TVs made to day as it has large speakers on each side of the screen. Only problem is it is only 1080i. I think it is good for another 10.
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post #17481 of 17490 Old 09-24-2014, 01:56 PM
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That was so funny aero1. Lol
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post #17482 of 17490 Old 09-24-2014, 05:21 PM
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Some of these may be old news, but it had been a while so I did a rescan and check of the OTA channels for the NYC area and noticed these changes,

WASA 24.1 is broadcasting Estrella TV in 720p. Anyone know when this started?

Katz Broadcasting had two of their networks added as sub channels to NYC area stations in August,
WXTV added a 4:3 SD sub channel 41.1 GRIT.
WFUT added a 4:3 SD sub channel 68.4 Escape TV.

Also noticed I am getting reception of WNYE DT channels again.

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post #17483 of 17490 Old Yesterday, 11:43 AM
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I did an add channel scan at 2:15 pm today and got nothing. I did another at 2:30 and have color bars on 3.3 showing KVNV TV and WJLP-TV with a pong like cursor moving left and right. my antenna is aimed at the antenna farm in Roxborogh, Philly running parallel with Manhattan from Rochelle Park, NJ.













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post #17484 of 17490 Old Yesterday, 04:45 PM
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i get the same thing but on channel 3.10 at 70% not bad for putting a lo vhf antenna only in the attic.

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post #17485 of 17490 Old Yesterday, 08:02 PM
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Getting one bar on KVNV TV but unlike my old Toshiba TV which would break up on 2 bars this newer Toshiba TV can get one bar and still not break up.

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post #17486 of 17490 Old Yesterday, 10:05 PM
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Wow is this channel strong, I got it pegged on my stb, is much stronger than wkob ch2. My yagi, 91xg has no problems with hi vhf, low vhf.
Seems like theyre ready.. 🌝
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post #17487 of 17490 Old Today, 02:00 AM
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Kvnv/kjlp/wjlp

At my reception location in NE Bergen County, KVNV Middletown Township is solid and most importantly steady. The signal is on par with all of the full-power television stations licensed to New York City.

Three other points of interest:

1. WNYE-TV: The signal for WNYE-TV New York has returned to normal as of approximately 12PM on September 27, 2014. This would appear to corroborate an earlier hypothesis made on this forum by another AVS member regarding the signal level being reduced to accommodate work for PMCM TV.

What is perplexing is that no request was ever filed by WNYE-TV to reduce power. My guess would be that a telephone call between station engineers for PMCM, WNYE-TV, and the FCC, in lieu of a formal application, sufficed.

2. WKOB-LD: The signal for WKOB-LD New York has been unreliable tonight. At times the signal is somewhat solid while other times it is too weak to decode. Tonight's atmospheric conditions are enhancing tropo, so the flux in signal is likely due to that. However, the KVNV signal has remained solid with no glitches.

This may help to allay the concerns of viewers who have concerns about the new channel 3 signal because of the deficiencies in the existing channel 2 signal. It may also help to demonstrate that WKOB-LD does not appear to be causing any harmful interference to KVNV.

3. Call-sign Controversy: PMCM TV officially requested the call-sign WJLP on September 26, 2014. This correlates to station personnel who stated this was their intended call-sign, and is reflected on the EBR Test Pattern presently airing on KVNV.

I stand by my research, all of which clearly points to call-sign KJLP. What remains unclear is why all the references to call-sign KJLP if PMCM TV ultimately will secure WJLP?

Regardless, if the call-sign ultimately is changed to WJLP, I will concede error. But I would also add that in that case, it is lamentable that New York City, given its geographic location, would not get the unique opportunity to host a licensed broadcast station with a "K" call-sign. And especially so provided the unique circumstances of how this TV station migrated to this market.
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post #17488 of 17490 Old Today, 03:11 AM
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On the tuner at my grandmother's house, it's plain to tell when KVNV signed on:

http://www.rabbitears.info/tvdx/rend...3/-24hours/now

But it doesn't decode. Considering it's hooked to standard rabbit ears on the second floor of her house, this isn't hugely surprising. Of course, as is typical, I was just there on Friday and got back to Virginia on Saturday evening, and now will have to wait until my next visit to play with it.

- Trip

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post #17489 of 17490 Old Today, 03:30 PM
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Getting low signal message no picture on RF 3 now.

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post #17490 of 17490 Old Today, 04:52 PM
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NYC was once a channel 4 market. I wonder how many interference complaints there are going to be from people who still have their cable boxes, etc. hooked up with modulated rf (on channel 3)?
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