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post #2941 of 2942 Old 05-27-2015, 10:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Hornfeck View Post
I'm not understanding your coax dilemma. If you have a PC and are thinking of using a HDHomeRun Prime, where does the coax figure in? Once you turn in the cable boxes and rent a cablecard ($1.95 ~ 2.00/mo) they'll give you a $7~8/mo credit.
Sorry about the confusion. It was past my bedtime. <g> I'm talking about two different plans-of-action here.

CURRENTLY:
The cable enters the house and runs thru a splitter. One port attaches to a 8-port distribution amp that subsequently drives any cable boxes, the other connects to the cable modem for bidirectional Internet traffic.

One cable box services a standard HDTV in the den. This one currently works OK.
The other cable box is intended to service the HTPC/projector in the media room. I'm currently trying to feed it through an existing run of RG-6 that was originally installed for another purpose. It's convenient because it runs between the HDTV den location and the HTPC location. I put a splitter (4dB loss) by the HDTV to split the signal between the HDTV and the projector.

ONE POSSIBILTY:
If I make a new run, I can feed the projector with a signal directly from an unused port on the distribution amp (ie., no splitter). I already have the HDMI switch and audio extractor to make this set-up work. (I have to switch the projector between the HTPC and the cable box, as WOW has ensured that it's difficult to get any HD content into a PC). Downside is that working in the crawl space is difficult since last summer when I received injuries in an auto accident.

ANOTHER POSSIBILITY:
Lose the cable box on the HTPC, replace it with a Silicon Dust/CableCard LAN resource and let the HTPC handle television duties over the LAN. This would simplify things, plus allow other PCs on the LAN to receive cable TV. Also, it may allow DVR functionality to be regained (does decrypted QAM have copy protection bit(s) in the bitstream?). Downside is the expense of the Silicon Dust equipment (which is not that much) and having to deal with WOW technical support. Also, I'll need to keep one cable box as the HDTV has no mechanism that I'm aware of for streaming content off a LAN (can a Roku 3 box do this?)

Quote:
You must have a bunch o' services since their pricing is: $65 for cable & 4mbps, add $15 phone = $80/mo unless you want more speed, $10 gets you 15mbps. Then there's the cost for extra cable boxes and/or DVRs? Hmmm... having a hard time getting to $157/mo. or are they working your prices down from $210 (whereas a new customer is calculated up from $65 ($60 in my case))?
I don't know - I don't think I have a bunch of services (Expanded Basic, no premium movie channels, phone, fast internet (better than 12Gbits/sec), price includes taxes and 'not-a-tax' taxes). The cable boxes are still free until the two year timeout is up.

I got Knology services in the lats '90s when I needed high-speed internet for work (they picked up the tab). This was internet only - no cable TV. several years later, my original landline provider, BellSouth, took six days to fix the phone (lightning had popped their fuse in the their side of the customer box. That irritated me enough to look into Knology's phone service. I discovered that I could get a cable/internet/phone bundle and lose BellSouth, only paying about $15 a month more than I was paying Knology and BellSouth combined. So I switched.

Prices have reflected the market, particularly due to providers passing on licensing fees for content I don't watch (sports, etc.). I suspect that most broadband provides take advantage of current customers' tendency to leave well enough alone. I've also never been particularly good at haggling, which is apparently what you need to deal with them.

I'm not particularly impressed with WOW, especially since they canned usenet. If I go the CableCard route, I may try to get some more price concessions.

-Dan
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post #2942 of 2942 Old 05-27-2015, 11:09 AM
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One 4dB splitter shouldn't be killing your signal off of a distribution amp! Maybe your signal at the input to your amp isn't up to snuff.


I use WMC since it does DRM for the Prime (cablecard) tuning and it works great! I'm not sure why you fear working w/WOW on the cablecard but once it's setup/registered it just works. I also question why you said that "WOW has ensured that it's difficult to get any HD content into a PC" What's that supposed to mean? I can tune, watch, record and playback any channel I'm subscribed to just fine in one or more PCs on my LAN. Sure, HD uses 6-8GB/hour to record on your HDD, but a 4TB HDD is $130 these days.


I don't do Roku but their site indicates they all (1, 2, 3) do streaming. Besides, you could grab an old PC, Win 7 (to include WMC) and you'd be set! Sure, the cable company and content owners can set their broadcast flags to do DRM, copy once, etc., but if you're playing back on the same PC you recorded there's no problem!
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