Overall history of Mitsubishi DLP. (Looking for insight into slightly used Mits) - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 6 Old 10-28-2014, 11:54 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Ostrogoth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NH
Posts: 72
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Overall history of Mitsubishi DLP. (Looking for insight into slightly used Mits)

I'm just getting into the marketplace for a 'new' TV, since my old, awesome Hitachi RPTV (2004) just died on me.

Anyone please chime in here with your knowledge with any changes that might have taken place from 2006 to 2012 for the Mits DLP sets.
I really can't find any comparisons that show the history of these lines of set (I can see tons of forums that might compare 1 or 2 specific Mits sets with a competitive set from another mfg, but that's about it).

A) In general, is the picture quality better each year? Or did all of the sudden, let's say the 2009 year get substantially better due to a new chip or x? Are there any vibes or consensus o on this?

B) Is there a general consensus on any jumps in reliability at some point in the history of the lineages? I have in my head that DLPs got a bad reputation early on for chip problems (dead pixels). In general, did all of these issue go away with time? Did these all go away and/or get minimized by, lets say 2010? Or is it just a crap shoot for a set with sticky pixels independent of year?

C) I also have in my head that there were 'color wheel' and 'screen door' effect issues early on? Did these dwindle with time also?

D) Even though Mits stopped production on these sets in 2012, are they still servicing them? still will service them, in case of chip failure, dead pixels?

E) Let's say the answer to D is that the support will dwindle with time... and I'm a handyman. Is it easy to buy a DLP chip from ebay and just install it myself or is there more to it than changing a bulb on the same sets?

The reason I ask, is there are a handful of sets on craigslist and such that seem incredibly cheap in my area, and I'm hoping to snag a nice 73" one, since space is not an issue for me. I see/know some people are getting rid of some due to space or just 'upgrading' to something that can hang on the wall due to the 'cool' effect for them, and I'd love to jump and say, I'll gladly take that for a few hundred from you.

Any further insight on what to look for, or what I should keep an eye out for, while shopping in the 2006-2012 models?

Vegetables are what food eats.
Ostrogoth is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 6 Old 10-29-2014, 01:22 PM
AVS Special Member
 
gtgray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,445
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 44 Post(s)
Liked: 59
I have a 2009 82" 82837 and a 2011 92" 92840. The 92" uses a clear screen and except for the reflectivity of the screen is brighter and has better color.


The 2009 sets had trouble controlling the brightness of blue and blue was understaturated. This tended to make different blue colors looks the same. It was very noticeable in Sports programming, or any stadium crowd scenes. Everyone wearing blue in the crowd looked to have the same child's chalk blue denim clothing. My 2009 also had problems with color drifting. You would set grayscale and then measure it several hours later and it would be off again. I bought a main board for it but never installed it. It ended up in a spare room. The issues with blue are characteristc of the 2009. The inability to maintain calibration may be specific to my set.


The 2011 92840 is just a better TV in every way compared to my 2009. I would expect that apply to the rest of the line. The 92840 was a flagship so it may have been better than others that year. I really don't know. The 82840 and 92840 did not have a dynamic iris, this was done to boost light levels at the cost of some shadow detail.


My impression is that the 2010 is better than the 2009, with the 2011 and 2012s being the best of the build years. Some of the lower cost models lack color adjustments.

Just another blank signature.
gtgray is offline  
post #3 of 6 Old 10-29-2014, 01:57 PM
AVS Special Member
 
taichi4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,417
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Liked: 93
Do you know, gtgray, whether the later sets... including your own... were less prone to light engine failure?

From what I understand, the problem of dark or light spots on the screen, which accumulate over time, is related to the failure of the DMD chip. The theories I have read have to do with the effects of both heat from the UHP lamp and the buildup of electrical charges on the micro-mirrors, causing them to get stuck in either on on or off position, resulting in corresponding light or dark pixels on the screen.

It would seem to me that a larger, more cavernous set like yours would have better air circulation, and so there may be less buildup of heat. Similarly, cleaning out dust from some of the smaller sets might accomplish the same thing. That would not rule out the effects of repeated electrical charge causing the micro-mirrors to malfunction.

Are you still happy with the brightness and color quality of your 92840 vis-a-vis today's flat panels?
taichi4 is offline  
post #4 of 6 Old 10-29-2014, 03:08 PM
AVS Special Member
 
gtgray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,445
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 44 Post(s)
Liked: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichi4 View Post
Do you know, gtgray, whether the later sets... including your own... were less prone to light engine failure?

From what I understand, the problem of dark or light spots on the screen, which accumulate over time, is related to the failure of the DMD chip. The theories I have read have to do with the effects of both heat from the UHP lamp and the buildup of electrical charges on the micro-mirrors, causing them to get stuck in either on on or off position, resulting in corresponding light or dark pixels on the screen.

It would seem to me that a larger, more cavernous set like yours would have better air circulation, and so there may be less buildup of heat. Similarly, cleaning out dust from some of the smaller sets might accomplish the same thing. That would not rule out the effects of repeated electrical charge causing the micro-mirrors to malfunction.

Are you still happy with the brightness and color quality of your 92840 vis-a-vis today's flat panels?
I don't know what your needs are. Are you looking for a bargain on a used set or are you looking for something state of the art?


I cheat by using an external video processor. I don't think you can really get ideal color out of these sets using the built in controls. If I were trying today without using a video processor, I would look at alternate approaches to what I did in the past.


Here's the problem, rear projectors have to compensate for light falling on the screen. The way that you do that is by increasing either the light level or the saturation. The sets are light limited by design. So they need separate calibrations for daylight and dark. While this is generally true of all display technologies, consumer rear projection DLPs really are faced with this problem in spades especially when you use the same lamp on a 65" and a 92". You can't just crank up the brightness until you completely overpower the ambient light in the daytime. In a dark room, with no light contamination then the daylight setting is oversaturated.


If you mostly watch at night or you go with one of the smaller (73" or less) you don't have so much of an issue because a smaller screen yields a brighter screen which offsets ambient light better.


All that means is it just depends on what you are trying to achieve and at what price.. Generally though, these sets do somethings great and somethings not so great. Motion is better than even plasma. Blacks are better than older, lower end LCDs, but not anything to write home about. The contrast is not in the same league with better flat panels today which is a key component, perhaps the biggest part of picture quality. Remember that 73" and above displays were pretty much insanely priced in other technologies just a couple years ago.


So you have size/cost and motion as still top of the charts on these sets. What you don't have is black level and maximum brightness to compete with flat panels. There is an intangible and that is the look, DLP rear projection is often described as very film like and I find it quite pleasing.


I compensate for less than stellar internal color controls by using an external video processor to get the color near perfect. I use a Darbee Darblet processor to aid inter-scene contrast. Taken together I get a very good and accurate image on my 92840 but I have a lot of money invested. To this moment it is still less than other technologies at today's prices for similar size displays. It is pretty hard for me to imagine replacing what I have now with LED/LCD based on the lousy motion handling of that technology, especially on 4K displays.


But who knows if not this year, maybe late 2015 or 2016 there will be a display that I would consider swapping for. I really like both big and bright. The main thing I don't have no is a light cannon to allow me to have the drapes open and all the lights on during a Sunday afternoon football game. My wife always gripes that the living room is gloomy. A 2011 or 12 73" makes so much more light it can tolerate much brighter rooms without washout.

Just another blank signature.
gtgray is offline  
post #5 of 6 Old 10-29-2014, 03:50 PM
AVS Special Member
 
taichi4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,417
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Liked: 93
Thanks.

Right now I'm waiting for OLED prices to come down. At some point soon large, thin, light OLED panels will give size, contrast, brightness and more. LG's current 55" 1080P has a spectacular look, but some have complained about motion handling and a few other issues. I believe these will be sorted out with later iterations, and large, affordable, 4K will likely come soon.

We communicated about your set when you got it originally.

For the OP, I always thought the 73838 had a very bright and clear picture.
taichi4 is offline  
post #6 of 6 Unread Today, 10:30 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Ostrogoth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NH
Posts: 72
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Thanks for some notes, gang.

I got the set recently. $400 for an 82738. I think it's a good bang for the buck. I know it's not top tier picture quality compared to the high end sets in the 50s-60s inch range these days, but not too bad. Great response, especially on sports. The one thing that I am kind of bummed about is the screen door effect. I assume that might come with owning a DLP. Even after an Avia II calibration, it got better, but the SDE on uniform color backgrounds and people's faces is prominent.

Any suggestion on how to reduce the SDE beside doing what I've alreay done. Should I be seeing it prominently? I don't see much in the forums on ways to reduce it (maybe because there aren't?)

Vegetables are what food eats.
Ostrogoth is online now  
Reply Rear Projection Units

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off