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post #1 of 386 Old 05-26-2004, 04:32 PM - Thread Starter
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WHAT IS "BURN-IN"

Typically, "burn-in" is defined as an uneven wear of a phosphor based display unit (Plasma and CRT for example). It is the phenomena of being able to "see" the remnants of something that was being "displayed" even though you are watching totally different content. It is not image retention, which goes away.

HOW DOES IT OCCUR

It occurs due to content being viewed not in the aspect ratio of the display unit thereby aging phosphors in the display differently. For example, 4:3 content is being viewed as 4:3 content on a 16:9 display device with the side bars as "black". Viewing in this way for extended periods of time (not defined) will cause the phosphors in the middle of the unit to age faster than the phosphors in the black side bar. When phosphors age they decrease in brightness.

WHAT PERCENTAGE OF RPCRT OWNERS EXPERIENCE "BURN-IN"

Although there is no, as yet, survey of all CRT owners, many owners of such devices have not experienced it. Rough guess, less than 1%. The few that have would, IMHO, be guilty of "abusing" the display.

IS THERE ANYTHING THAT CAN BE DONE TO CIRCUMVENT "BURN-IN"

Absolutely, the list is as follows:

1) Get your display "calibrated". Now if that entails a professional ISF calibration (~$400) or a calibration via Avia or DVE (~$40). That's your call. Alot of "damage" can be curtailed by dialing down the brightness and contrast from the get go.
2) Put some sort of "color" on the side bars when watching 4:3 content in its native aspect ratio. If you absolutely hate stretching 4:3 content, that is filling the 16:9 aspect ratio of the unit, then make sure that the side bars are set to either "gray" or some other color than "black".
3) Did I mention to dial down the contrast and brightness?
4) Vary your viewing habits. In this day and age of 16:9 DVD's, HD content and SD content this should not be difficult to be achieved.
5) Dial down the contrast and brightness, are you getting this part yet?
6) CRTs are susceptible to "burn-in" when in their infancy as the phosphors have not had a chance to age. A few hundred hours of watching varied material to age the phosphors is not unrealistic and will probably due a lot to curtail possible damage.
7) TURN DOWN THE CONTRAST AND BRIGHTNESS OF THE DISPLAY. Sorry, but I firmly believe that this is crucial to preventing burn-in damage.
8) When you are done playing a video game or watching a movie with the black bars on the top and bottom, watch a program that fills the screen for the same amount of time you spent playing the video game or watching the movie. This will in a way help to wash away the previous static image.

OKAY, I'M A (put your own explicative here), I HAVE "BURN-IN" IS THEIR ANYTHING THAT CAN BE DONE

Are you sure it is "burn-in"? It may be "image retention", which is different. Image retention is the phenomena of being able to "see" what was just on the screen prior to turning off the unit. Image retention goes away and has no effect on the display. It may, however, be a sign that your contrast and brightness are too high. Burn-in stays on the screen forever, never disappears and really bad burn in can make text unintelligible.

Back to the question, is there anything that can be done to fix burn in? Yes, there is. As stated before "burn-in" is the uneven wear, or aging, of phosphors. You can reduce it by reversing the image of the screen. For example, let's say that you have the middle of the screen burned in because you used black bars when watching 4:3 content. Just put up grey bars or white bars for the side and don't display anything in the middle. How? Just unplug your STB from the unit when in 4:3 mode. The time it takes to "erase" the burn-in will be in direct proportion to the amount of time that was spent watching 4:3 content with the black bars

I WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT BURN-IN

There is alot of information concerning this topic. A "Google" or "Yahoo" search will yield more results

AVS Forum Burn-in FAQ

Keohi HDTV - Learn About Burn-in

HDTVArcade.com - FAQ on Burn-in

IS A RPCRT THE RIGHT CHOICE FOR ME

Unfortunately, no one can tell you definitively whether a rpcrt, or any viewing device for that matter, will be the best choice for you. There are too many considerations to take into account. CRT displays offer one of the best pictures that can be found today. Only you are aware of what you would use the display for. Only you know what your budget is. Only you can make that choice. I would say that if you plan on using your display as a computer display or you plan on playing video games for 90% of your viewing time, then a crt might not be for you. But only you can make that decision.

CONCLUSION

CRT displays can offer the viewer a very clean, detailed, color accurate and film-like picture. A "looking through the window" type of experience. As with any investment of a significant nature, rpcrts can also be a very expensive and care must be taken as not to abuse your television.

MY OWN PERSONAL EXPERIENCES

Before coming to this forum in Nov of 2002 I decided that an rpcrt was right for me based on price and performance. I ended up with a Panasonic 47" 1920x1080 unit. I must say that this unit is becoming very popular on this forum. One of the reasons is because this display has one of the finest pictures that I have seen from rear projection televisions. The flexibility that Panasonic includes in their rpcrts for tweaking makes this television capable of displaying dvds, hd movies, shows and sports that have a 3 dimensional, film-like quality to them. When I have people over who are not as into home theater as I am, I get general comments that while watching a dvd and especially hd, it looks as if you are right there. My father made the comment as we were watching What Lies Beneath (bwt, this one of the best looking hd movies I have seen) ota on ABC that it looks like you are looking through glass. I have enjoyed this unit now for close to a year and a half and I am happy to report no sign of "burn-in" and no sign of the display starting to dim. I played Grand Theft Auto: Vice City on the display on Friday night (5-7-04) as I have been doing ever so often with SSX 3 on my PS2 and some NFL football, NBA basketball and Halo on my X-Box. I do everything in moderation. A little video game here, some dvd movies there and some hd and standard def television here. I provide my television with a steady mixture of images. It is just like your daily eating routine; you make sure that you have a steady diet of foods that are represented throughout the food pyramid that we learned about in elementary school. Don't feed yourself too much of one food or too little of another. A balanced diet, whether it is food or home theater, is the key to ensuring you and your television has a long and healthy existence.

I want to thank rmcgirr83, better known as the Other Rich, for helping with this and for allowing me to base this post with modification on his original post that is over in the Plasma Forum Master Burn-in thread. I also would like to thank Barrybud for allowing this thread. I hope that this thread can be of helpful to the many who come this forum and have questions about burn-in.

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post #2 of 386 Old 05-26-2004, 08:16 PM
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I've been reading these burn-in threads for a few years, watching the reports of burn-in incidents drop over time. However I continue to read of the occasional problem.

My question is as follows:

Given that one has a calibrated CRT run at recommended contrast and brightness, then what are the chances of experiencing burn if 75% of one's viewing is of 4:3 material in its native aspect ration with grey bars? Let's say the set is on 4 hours a day.

I've heard varying responses on this. The majority opinion has been than the grey bars would greatly slow the process of burn-in but it would not prevent it over time.
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post #3 of 386 Old 05-26-2004, 08:58 PM
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^ I would like to know this as well plus what others think about playing video games for an average of 2 hrs / day on CRT RPTVs?

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post #4 of 386 Old 05-27-2004, 04:01 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:


Originally posted by Tom_Bombadil
I've been reading these burn-in threads for a few years, watching the reports of burn-in incidents drop over time. However I continue to read of the occasional problem.

My question is as follows:

Given that one has a calibrated CRT run at recommended contrast and brightness, then what are the chances of experiencing burn if 75% of one's viewing is of 4:3 material in its native aspect ration with grey bars? Let's say the set is on 4 hours a day.

I've heard varying responses on this. The majority opinion has been than the grey bars would greatly slow the process of burn-in but it would not prevent it over time.

Well, some people feel that they gray bars slow down the burn-in process. In all truth, I cannot give you a specific time before you would see the effects of burn-in. Your usage will vary greatly from someone else. If you do watch with the gray bars 75% of time, then you should also mix in "stretched" content to help the phosphur wear evenly.

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post #5 of 386 Old 05-27-2004, 04:05 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:


Originally posted by rolltide1017
^ I would like to know this as well plus what others think about playing video games for an average of 2 hrs / day on CRT RPTVs?

As was said in the burn-in post, if you play for 2 hours, mix in regular tv content for about the same amount of time you played the video games. This allows the phospur to wear evenly and that is the most important part. Read the faq above and go from there. You shouldn't have to worry about a problem if you do the necessary adjustments.

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post #6 of 386 Old 05-27-2004, 08:02 AM
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Antonio,

Great post and I think it will help many members!

Quick Reference of Forum Rules
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post #7 of 386 Old 05-27-2004, 08:03 AM
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antonio - what is the model number of your panny display?

thanks

jim
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post #8 of 386 Old 05-27-2004, 08:50 AM
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Hi. I guess I'm not sure if I have a burn in or image retention,but here is what I have. I have replay tv, and on my screen, I can constantly see the small r with the circle around it, and the words "Panasonic" (I have a panasonic showstopper model of replay) in the upper right corner. Basically, its the screen you see when you stop watching a recorded program. Granted, I can only see these images when the picture is white or light, but now that I know its there, I am constantly looking for it.

Anything I can do? the TV is still under warrenty, its less than a year old. Its a Toshiba cinema series, the 82model.
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post #9 of 386 Old 05-27-2004, 09:14 AM
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Thank you, thank you, thank you.
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post #10 of 386 Old 05-27-2004, 02:22 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:


Originally posted by jim tressler
antonio - what is the model number of your panny display?

thanks

jim

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post #11 of 386 Old 05-27-2004, 02:32 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:


Originally posted by StevieJ
Hi. I guess I'm not sure if I have a burn in or image retention,but here is what I have. I have replay tv, and on my screen, I can constantly see the small r with the circle around it, and the words "Panasonic" (I have a panasonic showstopper model of replay) in the upper right corner. Basically, its the screen you see when you stop watching a recorded program. Granted, I can only see these images when the picture is white or light, but now that I know its there, I am constantly looking for it.

Anything I can do? the TV is still under warrenty, its less than a year old. Its a Toshiba cinema series, the 82model.

It most likely is burn-in. Check with Toshiba to see if this is covered under their warranty. Most companies do not cover this issue.

What I would suggest you do is get the contrast and brightness set properly. I have a Directv hd rec connected to my set and everytime I change the channel the channel banner appears. When I want to see what is on another station I use the small guide that appears at the bottom of the screen. My point is that there is no sign of burn-in and those things that I mentioned are only on the screen for no longer than 30 to 45 seconds. Just take precautions with how long those banners are displayed on your screen.

Also, you could use the all white screen on Video Essentials to try to reverse the burn-in that has occured. Others on this forum and the Plasma forum have tried this method, but how long you have tp do this process varies.

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post #12 of 386 Old 05-27-2004, 03:45 PM
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Quote:


Originally posted by AFH
Well, some people feel that they gray bars slow down the burn-in process. In all truth, I cannot give you a specific time before you would see the effects of burn-in. Your usage will vary greatly from someone else. If you do watch with the gray bars 75% of time, then you should also mix in "stretched" content to help the phosphur wear evenly.

Well, I wasn't looking for a specific time, but was hoping to get a more definitive answer than this. More like ...

A) Even with gray bars, you can expect to start seeing burn-in within 6 months or 12 months.

B) With the carefully adjusted gray bars of today's sets, and given you are running at lower contrast & brightness, then you really should be able to get 3 or more years out before seeing any effects. And perhaps you would never experience burn-in as the gray bars at the right settings completely compensate.

I mean are these gray bars effective or not? Are they only a little bit effective so that they might prevent burn-in with 20% 4:3 usage? 30%? 50%?

I know a lot of people are so fearful of burn-in that they watch all 4:3 in stretch mode. I hate the idea of dropping $2000 on a set only to watch 75% of the content being distorted by the TV. That doesn't make any sense.

Some people will then recommend going to LCD or DLP. But is that necessary? Do the anti-burn-in methods employed by the latest CRTs work or not? This being the Master Burn-In thread, I thought this would be the place to come to get this answer.

Anyone have reliable information on this?
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post #13 of 386 Old 05-27-2004, 04:00 PM
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Why not just watch the analog and digital channels in widescreen and stretch the screen a little... I saw it like that on my friend's 42" Toshiba and it wasnt that bad... after 15 minutes I got used to it.

What I am afriad of when I buy my RP CRT is if I am watching a lot of DVDs that happen to have the Black Bars on the top and bottom of the screen. I don't want to lose the quality of the DVD picture by "zooming" in or stretching the picture so that I won't see ANY black bars, but I also don't want those black bars on the top and bottom of the screen to burn in. Obviously, it would only be for 2 hours or so (the length of the movie), and afterwards it would probably be a good idea to watch something that will take up the entire screen with movement - but again, I am afriad that after watching 100's of movies like this for months and eventually years, it will cause a Burn-In at the top and bottom of my HDTV

Is this so???

Thanks.

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post #14 of 386 Old 05-27-2004, 05:31 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:


Originally posted by Tom_Bombadil
Well, I wasn't looking for a specific time, but was hoping to get a more definitive answer than this. More like ...

A) Even with gray bars, you can expect to start seeing burn-in within 6 months or 12 months.

B) With the carefully adjusted gray bars of today's sets, and given you are running at lower contrast & brightness, then you really should be able to get 3 or more years out before seeing any effects. And perhaps you would never experience burn-in as the gray bars at the right settings completely compensate.

I mean are these gray bars effective or not? Are they only a little bit effective so that they might prevent burn-in with 20% 4:3 usage? 30%? 50%?

I know a lot of people are so fearful of burn-in that they watch all 4:3 in stretch mode. I hate the idea of dropping $2000 on a set only to watch 75% of the content being distorted by the TV. That doesn't make any sense.

Some people will then recommend going to LCD or DLP. But is that necessary? Do the anti-burn-in methods employed by the latest CRTs work or not? This being the Master Burn-In thread, I thought this would be the place to come to get this answer.

Anyone have reliable information on this?

1) NO one can tell you when you will see burn-in, if you see it at all. It all depends on YOUR usage. There is no specific time frame.

2) If you hate the idea of stretching 4:3 then that is your choice. If it doesn't make sense to you then it doesn't make sense. No one is going to force you to buy a RPCRT or stretch 4:3 material. Once again IT IS YOUR CHOICE. You have to pay the money for a new television, be it CRT, DLP and LCD.

You have already made your choice, now it is time for you to understand why you made it. Alot of people maybe afraid of burn-in, but that is why you read DIFFERENCE sources, this being one, to get an understanding of the problem and ways to minimize the risk. It's all in the first thread. Read it.

3) CRTs do not employ anti burn-in methods. Some plasma displays do but not CRT.

You are right, this is the Master Burn-in thread and you can read the first post and the links contained within. No one is going to tell you what to get as I have a feeling you already know what you want. Read and make your own decision.

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post #15 of 386 Old 05-27-2004, 05:36 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally posted by Dallas22
Why not just watch the analog and digital channels in widescreen and stretch the screen a little... I saw it like that on my friend's 42" Toshiba and it wasnt that bad... after 15 minutes I got used to it.

What I am afriad of when I buy my RP CRT is if I am watching a lot of DVDs that happen to have the Black Bars on the top and bottom of the screen. I don't want to lose the quality of the DVD picture by "zooming" in or stretching the picture so that I won't see ANY black bars, but I also don't want those black bars on the top and bottom of the screen to burn in. Obviously, it would only be for 2 hours or so (the length of the movie), and afterwards it would probably be a good idea to watch something that will take up the entire screen with movement - but again, I am afriad that after watching 100's of movies like this for months and eventually years, it will cause a Burn-In at the top and bottom of my HDTV

Is this so???

Thanks.

Dallas, all you need to do is read the first post. What more can I say that isn't in the first post. Varied material and proper adjustment of contrast and brightness goes a long way.

Dallas22


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post #16 of 386 Old 05-27-2004, 08:09 PM
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Tom_B,
My 51" Sony developed very mild burn-in after about 12 months of viewing (90%) with the gray bars. Its only noticeable on very light backgrounds.
Most people can't see it...but its there.

Since noticing the burn-in, I only watch in Wide zoom stretch mode.
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post #17 of 386 Old 05-28-2004, 10:01 AM
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Quote:


Originally posted by AFH
1) NO one can tell you when you will see burn-in, if you see it at all. It all depends on YOUR usage. There is no specific time frame.

2) If you hate the idea of stretching 4:3 then that is your choice. If it doesn't make sense to you then it doesn't make sense. No one is going to force you to buy a RPCRT or stretch 4:3 material. Once again IT IS YOUR CHOICE. You have to pay the money for a new television, be it CRT, DLP and LCD.

You have already made your choice, now it is time for you to understand why you made it. Alot of people maybe afraid of burn-in, but that is why you read DIFFERENCE sources, this being one, to get an understanding of the problem and ways to minimize the risk. It's all in the first thread. Read it.

3) CRTs do not employ anti burn-in methods. Some plasma displays do but not CRT.

You are right, this is the Master Burn-in thread and you can read the first post and the links contained within. No one is going to tell you what to get as I have a feeling you already know what you want. Read and make your own decision.

Okay, I'm not trying to be contrary, but I tend to be a very precise person.

1) Burn-in is there or it isn't. This is not a matter of when I see it. I'm sure there is data possessed by each manufacturer about when burn-in will occur in their sets under specific conditions. I'm sure they have data about how long it takes their sets to start showing evidence of burn-in when gray bars are used at specific brightness and contrast levels.

2) I know watching in stretch mode minimizes the risk of burn-in, that is a given. I'm getting the picture that this thread is really about providing everyday advice about how to minimize the risk of burn-in rather than addressing issues like how prevalent the problem is, what is the risk under different conditions, how has the industry progressed on this front over the past 3-4 years, etc..

3) Grey side bars are an anti-burn-in method. They exist to reduce burn-in. They have also tweaked things in the CRT's themselves, the screens, lenses, and who knows what else over the years. Older CRT systems experienced much more rapid burn-in than the current models. So the fact is that several anti-burn-in methods/technologies have been employed and I am interested in knowing how effective they are.

You are correct in stating that I know what I want ... and that is relevant current information on this issue.
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post #18 of 386 Old 05-28-2004, 10:12 AM
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Originally posted by Dallas22
Why not just watch the analog and digital channels in widescreen and stretch the screen a little... I saw it like that on my friend's 42" Toshiba and it wasnt that bad... after 15 minutes I got used to it.

I'm afraid my visual senses are not blessed with this degree of forgiveness for visual distortion. I'm a very visually precise person. I have written professional reviews of optical equipment, such as binoculars, telescopes, and various lenses.

Frankly, I don't know how so many people who are so demanding of high precision video that they go out and drop $1500-$5000+ on HDTV sets, can watch stretched 4:3 material and be satisfied with it. I find stretched video to be grossly distorted and cannot watch it.

Several current stretch algorithms vary the aspect ratio across the screen, so that the center of the screen approaches the correct 4:3, and then it gradually changes as you approach the sides, going up to around 2:1 near the edges, so that the image fully fills a 16:9 display. I guess people who tend to focus on the center of the screen will not pay much heed to how images are altered as objects pass across the screen. This drives me crazy. I'd be sitting there the whole time as I watched it thinking, "I paid $2000 to watch this distorted crap?" Meanwhile my wife would be beside me not noticing any problems at all (her eyes lock into the center and she never notices edge distortion).
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post #19 of 386 Old 05-28-2004, 12:58 PM
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Quote:


Originally posted by Tom_Bombadil


Frankly, I don't know how so many people who are so demanding of high precision video that they go out and drop $1500-$5000+ on HDTV sets, can watch stretched 4:3 material and be satisfied with it. I find stretched video to be grossly distorted and cannot watch it.

What I think is that most people here just don't care much about most 4:3 material - myself included to be perfectly honest. DVD's and HDTVs are the high quality visuals we are very picky about - while standard cable looks pretty much like crap no matter what you do, so I guess in many peoples minds a little more distortion to go along with the noise and low resolution isn't that big a deal. Perhaps many do use grey bars, though, who knows.

No tv is honestly going to look great with SDTV and great with HDTV - at least not that I'm aware of and if I have to give up SDTV quality to gain HDTV/DVD quality I'm certainly willing to do so. Surely even you can understand giving up a little picture quality on the lastest episode of "who wants to marry my dad" in order to gain quality on Return of the King

Ring a Dong dillo..

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post #20 of 386 Old 05-28-2004, 02:14 PM
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Ok, I can deal with a crap in, crap out philosophy.

My trouble is that well over 50% of my viewing is of this stuff, like the 30 some channels of HBO, Showtime, Starz, etc. that I get from the Dish Network. I must watch at least 10-15X of that vs DVDs.

And now some of the channels proporting to be HD are nothing more than pre-stretched, upconverted SD, as the new TNT-HD channel.

It will be nice when there is a reasonable amount of true HD material to watch.
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post #21 of 386 Old 05-28-2004, 02:24 PM
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Quote:


Originally posted by ptlurking
Tom_B,
My 51" Sony developed very mild burn-in after about 12 months of viewing (90%) with the gray bars. Its only noticeable on very light backgrounds.
Most people can't see it...but its there.

YIKES!!!

That's terrible. I was hoping new sets were much better than this. As in, if one put up with gray bars then you would get at least 3 years before seeing any burn-in. I wouldn't even consider three years to be stellar performance.

Darn ... I had a good price negotiated on a new Hitachi 51s500.
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post #22 of 386 Old 05-29-2004, 04:52 PM
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Quote:


Originally posted by Tom_Bombadil
YIKES!!!

That's terrible. I was hoping new sets were much better than this. As in, if one put up with gray bars then you would get at least 3 years before seeing any burn-in. I wouldn't even consider three years to be stellar performance.

Darn ... I had a good price negotiated on a new Hitachi 51s500.

I wouldn't let one persons bad experience ruin you for a good deal on a very good TV. It might be a case of bad luck or it might be a case of contrast not being set low enough, or perhaps something else entirely - there are many factors involved.

I definately wouldn't let that ruin you on a CRT. I'd be quite willing to bet that for every person that experienced burn in after 1 year, there are 20 who don't experience any burn in after 7 or 8 years ( of those who have their tv's calibrated right - no one on AVS would be dumb enough to leave the contrast set super high I'd imagine ).

Tom

Expert in training ;)
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post #23 of 386 Old 05-30-2004, 09:51 AM
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How common is it to have burn-in from watching too many 2.35:1 movies? I have my contrast and brightness pretty low but am still worried about it. I watch about half dvd's and half television. I always use the stretch modes for television but it seems like 90% of my dvds are 2.35:1. Should I be worried?
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post #24 of 386 Old 05-31-2004, 09:40 AM
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Quote:


Originally posted by david118383
How common is it to have burn-in from watching too many 2.35:1 movies? I have my contrast and brightness pretty low but am still worried about it. I watch about half dvd's and half television. I always use the stretch modes for television but it seems like 90% of my dvds are 2.35:1. Should I be worried?

The only case of 2.35:1 burn in I have heard of was at a specialty hometheater shop that was using a 2:35:1 DVD in a contiinuous loop as a demo. If your contrast is set properly and you use the 4:3 stretch mode, it is not a worry.
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post #25 of 386 Old 05-31-2004, 08:05 PM
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Actually this issue does freeze me on buying an HD set. I really like the newest Hitachi's and Mits. Love the picture quality. But as I can't stand to watch 4:3 stretch modes & a good 60%-75% of my viewing is of 4:3, I don't have confidence that I could make it more than 6-12 months before visible burn-in appears. When I first heard of the use of gray bars, I thought they might do the trick. But no one ever guarantees that they do.

I just watched a bit of 4:3 stretch again this weekend. It was closeup of a couple kissing. The center of the screen looked pretty good - using the newest stretch modes where the center stays very close to 4:3. But as the edges are aggressively stretched, this had the effect of elongating both of their heads so that they no longer looked human. My wife, being a person who focuses their attention on the center/action, didn't even notice it. To me, the weird distorted image just jumped off of the screen at me.

I'm looking over my room to see if there is anyway of keeping my present tube 4:3 set to use for SD and using the RPTV only for HD and DVDs. But I don't think I can make both fit in a way that they would both be usable. Otherwise it's waiting for the next generation of DLP/LCD/D-ILA sets.

As to 2.35:1 burn in, it is everybit as susceptible to burning-in as 4:3. It's just that most people won't watch that much 2.35:1 to burn it. If 75% of one's use is 4:3 or 2.35:1, they have the same issue to deal with.
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post #26 of 386 Old 06-03-2004, 10:32 AM
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Tom,
There are some technologies which will not have burn in:
i.e.
DLP
Digital LCOS (eLCOS/Intel/new JVC RPTVs)

There are many potential causes for image burn in, but in projection this can be mainly attributed to the accuracy of the voltage applied to the display.

Roland
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post #27 of 386 Old 06-07-2004, 03:49 AM
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on 4x3 material I use the zoom on my hitachi not the stretch. i agree that the stretch is crap. the only draw back is that you lose some picture at the very edges of the original signal, but the picture stays in the right proportion.
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post #28 of 386 Old 06-08-2004, 07:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by rolypoly
Tom,
There are some technologies which will not have burn in:
i.e.
DLP
Digital LCOS (eLCOS/Intel/new JVC RPTVs)
. . .

Roland

I didn't realize until after I had bought my DLP, a 50" RCA, that DLPs are not subject to the dreaded burn in problem. I bought my DLP only because I saw it standing next to an LCD HDTV on the dealer's floor and thought that its PQ was significantly better than the LCD's.

The DLP's immunity from burn in has proved to be a boon to me. The horizontal distortion caused by stretching and the apparent loss of resolution caused by zooming bother me so I am grateful that I can watch 4:3 material in native format and not have to worry about burn in.
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post #29 of 386 Old 06-08-2004, 11:46 AM
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One reason I would go for DLP is also the immunity to burn-in. I know I would take care of a CRT set because I paid for it. But I am currently living with a roommate that may not do the same. I am not saying that he won't take care of it,but, i'd hate to come home and see him playing a sportsgame with the contrast up and having all the stats permanently on my screen :-/

As of now, it doesn't matter, cuz i don't have enough money for even the cheapest CRT

Is it Friday yet?
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post #30 of 386 Old 06-08-2004, 02:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by rolypoly
Tom,
There are some technologies which will not have burn in:
i.e.
DLP
Digital LCOS (eLCOS/Intel/new JVC RPTVs)

Yes, I am aware of this.

But none of them can delivery a picture equivalent to say a Hitachi 51s500 for $1600.

I love the image that a well-adjusted CRT-based RPTV can throw up. The price is acceptable to me. I don't care much about whether the set weighs 80 or 240 pounds, or if it is flat enough to hang on a wall.

So the only thing stopping me from buying is the 4:3 issue. Well, and my budget as I can address the 4:3 issue by throwing a lot more money at the solution. But even there, it is my opinion that sets like the Hitachi and Mits produce a better picture than what I've seen from Samsung DLPs. So in that scenario, I would spend twice as much to get a set that doesn't burn in on 4:3 material, but produces an inferior picture on all widescreen material. Another tough choice to make.

This is why I was hoping that the anti-burn-in technologies employed by current CRT-based sets had become more effective. I could easily learn to live with gray vertical bars if they allowed me to watch native aspect 4:3 material without the fear of burn-in.
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