Build You Own (BYO) TV Stand - Page 13 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #361 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 07:37 AM
Senior Member
 
Kenlex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: MA
Posts: 265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Kid,

How about component shelves R and L, flanking a single DVD drawer in the middle?

Components are 19" wide, so you want your shelves to have at least 20" clear inside, to move the components around easily. I made mine 20 1/8, in case I ever wanted to go to rack mount. 20 1/8 is the width you need if you then use commercially-available metal "ears" to create the appropriate rack mount. Not sure I'll ever do that, but the provision is there. Remember to leave enough depth, too, for cables as well as components.

Re the center channel speaker, have you considered building the unit as a "hutch" (I **hate** that term, but what can you do?) with a compartment for the center channel speaker over the TV? It could be flanked by DVD storage...
Kenlex is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #362 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 07:48 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Kid Red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Orlando, Fl
Posts: 3,733
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Kenlex- Not sure if you remember my set up- http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...07#post4749607

But i just think a hutch would make it too crowded, and fill the smallish room too much. I think mounting the CC on a shelf and maybe have a idealume light under it to wash the wall behind the set. By putting a drawer in the middle, I would lose 2 component shelves, unless you have something else in mind.
Kid Red is offline  
post #363 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 09:13 AM
Senior Member
 
Kenlex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: MA
Posts: 265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Thanks for the pointer to your photo. Yes, I see. I guess I would be inclined to have a shelf bridge all the way between the two book cases, with the TV stand centered underneath.

In terms of the DVD drawer, I was thinking a bay of component shelves on the left, the DVD drawer in the center, and a bay of component shelves on the right. Lots of component space, I'd think. If the DVD drawer were made shallower (front to back) than the rest of the unit, your power strip could use the rear of that space. If each component shelf bay is 20" wide, and your total stand width is 50", and you have the thickness of four 3/4" panels, that leaves you with 7" for the width of the DVD drawer bay, which is just about what you need.
Kenlex is offline  
post #364 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 10:18 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Kid Red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Orlando, Fl
Posts: 3,733
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
So you think having the dvd drawer in the middle would look better then the components in the middle and doors on the side? I haven't thought of that, I'll make a drawing up to see what it looks like.
Kid Red is offline  
post #365 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 10:37 AM
Senior Member
 
Kenlex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: MA
Posts: 265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Kid,

I think that, aesthetically, DVD drawer - component bay - component bay - DVD drawer would look better, BUT you don't have the width for that! Component bay - DVD drawer - component bay will fit, will be fine aesthetically, your friends will ooh and ahh over what a nice job you did, and only YOU will know that you had wanted to do something different!
Kenlex is offline  
post #366 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 10:41 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Kid Red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Orlando, Fl
Posts: 3,733
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
haha, good point. Well, I'll draw it up and we can compare.
Kid Red is offline  
post #367 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 11:00 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Kid Red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Orlando, Fl
Posts: 3,733
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
K, here's quick rough, like this?
LL
Kid Red is offline  
post #368 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 11:45 AM
Senior Member
 
Kenlex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: MA
Posts: 265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Yeah, that's it. I'd make the shelves in the component bays adjustable. Were you planning on a plywood back, or open? If you leave the component bays open in back, you'll want to have a plywood back on the DVD drawer compartment to provide needed rigidity to the whole assembly.
Kenlex is offline  
post #369 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 11:48 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Kid Red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Orlando, Fl
Posts: 3,733
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Wasn't sure if open or not. i want air to circulate freely. The DVD draw or shelf would have a back for the power bar. You really think the shelves should be adjustable? My receiver is 8" h and the shelf area would be at least 9" tall. I didn't think there would be any component much taller the that.
Kid Red is offline  
post #370 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 02:36 PM
Member
 
trtinkerer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NY
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I.ve been lurking on this forum for a week or so. I have also been working on my stand. Attached is a picture of my stand at present. It still needs the op to be put on and the drawers to be completed. It is 57 wide, 22 3/4 wide and 23 1/2 tall. There are 3 bays 18 inches wide with two drawers and an opening in the middle. Yes, that is cherry plywood, there are some cherry solids and a solid top. I make grandfather's clocks for a hobby, so I have a complete woodworking shop. I'll post a few more pictures as well.

LL
trtinkerer is offline  
post #371 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 02:37 PM
Member
 
trtinkerer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NY
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Picture 2 of my stand
LL
trtinkerer is offline  
post #372 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 02:38 PM
Member
 
trtinkerer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NY
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Picture 3 of my stand
LL
trtinkerer is offline  
post #373 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 02:39 PM
Member
 
trtinkerer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NY
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Lets try picture 3 again of my stand
LL
trtinkerer is offline  
post #374 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 02:43 PM
Senior Member
 
Kenlex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: MA
Posts: 265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally posted by Kid Red
You really think the shelves should be adjustable? My receiver is 8" h and the shelf area would be at least 9" tall. I didn't think there would be any component much taller the that.

Well, no. But, you never know what you'll want to have where a few years down the road.

I would be inclined to put in a series of holes for the pin-type shelf supports. You probably don't need more than 3 or 5 holes in a row: One hole located so that the space is divided exactly in half vertically, and then an inch and a half or so above and below that spot, and then perhaps again.

Besides, it would be less work than fixed shelves!
Kenlex is offline  
post #375 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 02:50 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Kid Red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Orlando, Fl
Posts: 3,733
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
trtinkerer- very nice. Almost the design I and Kenlex are pushing around. Cool to see something close, and how you went about assembling it.

Kenlex- good point. I see how trtinkerer did his, so I will do it that way as well.
Kid Red is offline  
post #376 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 06:59 PM
Member
 
trtinkerer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NY
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I made mine open both in front and in back. What you may not see is that I put a rabbit in the back of my shelf stops so I can add a 1/4 inch piece of plywood if I think it needs a back. Being an electrical engineer I know how heat affects the lifetime of electronics and want to make sure they stay cool. Insert doors are also possible using european hinges.

For the shelves I used a shelf pin drillling guide and bit from Woodcraft, $35 or so. It puts holes in about every 1 1/2 inches.
trtinkerer is offline  
post #377 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 07:14 PM
Member
 
Pablopsd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Southeastern MA
Posts: 131
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Hey Red,
I just got around to checking over the forum and saw you mention MDF. MDF will paint great, and is stable as far as movement except if it gets really wet. However, I would not use it for anything structural. If you recall seeing some photos of a job I did way back at the beginning of the forum, we used MDF for the raised panels. It was a painted job. From experience, the MDF won't hold screws well or anything like that. Great for other non structural things, or decorative applications. I used birch plywood with poplar solids for face frames, MDF for the panels and decorative applications on the wainscoting.
LL
Pablopsd is offline  
post #378 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 07:29 PM
Senior Member
 
Kenlex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: MA
Posts: 265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally posted by Pablopsd
Hey Red,
I just got around to checking over the forum and saw you mention MDF. MDF will paint great, and is stable as far as movement except if it gets really wet. However, I would not use it for anything structural. If you recall seeing some photos of a job I did way back at the beginning of the forum, we used MDF for the raised panels. It was a painted job. From experience, the MDF won't hold screws well or anything like that. Great for other non structural things, or decorative applications. I used birch plywood with poplar solids for face frames, MDF for the panels and decorative applications on the wainscoting.

Pablo,

While I'd agree that birch plywood is easier to screw and nail into, you can successfully build stuctural stuff out of MDF. I'll bet you've had problems with fasteners pulling out. MDF is a strong enough material, but it DOES have the problem that fasteners will pull out if you use the wrong kind. Also, dadoes should be shallow. I have a painted MDF TV stand with a 25" Sony XBR CRT on it, and structurally it's fine. I dowelled and glued the top to the sides (don't have a biscuit joiner).

There are special screws for particle board that work well on MDF. Home Depot has them in the specialty hardware section. They are relatively large diameter with coarse threads.
Kenlex is offline  
post #379 of 1408 Old 01-28-2005, 07:31 PM
Senior Member
 
Kenlex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: MA
Posts: 265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Forgot to say, Pablo -- BEAUTIFUL project in your photo!
Kenlex is offline  
post #380 of 1408 Old 01-29-2005, 06:29 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Kid Red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Orlando, Fl
Posts: 3,733
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Well, we wen to Sears and then to BB, and I go the JVC. However, they had a decent stand there, the wife loved it, got the guy to come off 50% on the stand price, so I guess I won't be making my own. I get to built it, but from the box, lol. Oh well, we'll see how it goes and fits into what we have. So thanks for all the suggestions, I'm sure I'll use them at point.
Kid Red is offline  
post #381 of 1408 Old 01-29-2005, 08:29 AM
Senior Member
 
Kenlex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: MA
Posts: 265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:


Originally posted by Kid Red
...they had a decent stand there, the wife loved it, got the guy to come off 50% on the stand price, so I guess I won't be making my own. I get to built it, but from the box, lol.

Kid, it happens to the best of us from time to time!
Kenlex is offline  
post #382 of 1408 Old 01-29-2005, 10:03 AM
Member
 
stale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
You all have inspired me to build my own. I'm novice as far as carpentry goes, but I'm fairly handy (built my kitchen and patio). My biggest set back is that our small condo does not afford me the space I need to do this project right, so I have to do some creative shuffling.

I've attached a drawing of what I'm thinking of building. Don't pay too much attention to the numbers I threw on there. I'm thinking the rough dimensions would be 64Wx22Hx20D. I'm planning on getting the Sony 55WF or XS to fill the space. And the drawers should allow for DVDs and manuals.

I can't decide whether to get solid pine (which would allow me to route a nice edge) or use plywood. I understand that plywood is cheaper and stronger, but are there any other reasons I should be convinced to go one way of the other?

Also I took a test run cutting some pine with my compound miter saw and the edges were the cuts were made were shredded. I'm guessing I have the wrong type of blade (although I have a carbide tip one that I thought was really good). What kind of blade will give me clean cuts?

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

-stale
LL
stale is offline  
post #383 of 1408 Old 01-29-2005, 10:44 AM
Senior Member
 
Kenlex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: MA
Posts: 265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Stale,

Welcome!

Taking your questions from the top:

If you want to build this out of solid pine, you'll have to get glued-up panels, because you surely won't find any 20" wide pine boards! I know Home Depot carries them, but I'm not sure whether they have panels > 16". This may actually be a good choice for you if you're working in a condo, with limited space to maneuver 4x8 sheets of plywood. Of course, you could also have the lumber yard cut do the major cuts on your plywood for you, though you can't expect them to be more accurate than +/- 1/8".

Plywood is uniform, stable, and easy to work. And, depending on your source, you can get it in many hardwood veneers. I like to work in red oak and maple, myself, though I'll use birch if I'm painting something (also will use MDF if it's to be painted).

With plywood, for the edge, you can by plywood edge moulding specifically designed for the purpose. Or, you can get "iron-on" veneer tape in the same specie as your plywood, which is what I always do.

For furniture work you want a good carbide blade like Freud. My main blade for finish work is a 50-tooth blade. For plywood I have an 80-tooth blade. Be aware of whether the top or bottom of the board being cut will have the cleaner edge. For hardwood veneer plywood, even an 80-tooth blade is apt to tear oak veneer. You can put masking tape right down your intended cut line to minimize the problem. I also have a steel plywood blade that also does a fine job.

Hope this helps!
Kenlex is offline  
post #384 of 1408 Old 01-29-2005, 12:05 PM
Senior Member
 
falsedawn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 287
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:


Originally posted by stale

Also I took a test run cutting some pine with my compound miter saw and the edges were the cuts were made were shredded. I'm guessing I have the wrong type of blade (although I have a carbide tip one that I thought was really good). What kind of blade will give me clean cuts?

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

-stale

Try scoring the cut line with a utility knife before making the actual cut. This helps with plywood and may help with pine.

John
falsedawn is offline  
post #385 of 1408 Old 01-29-2005, 12:32 PM
Member
 
stale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:


Originally posted by Kenlex
If you want to build this out of solid pine, you'll have to get glued-up panels, because you surely won't find any 20" wide pine boards! I know Home Depot carries them, but I'm not sure whether they have panels > 16". [/b]

Actually I was just at HD and they had 2'X4' pine boards. 3/4" and 1 1/8" thicknesses. However, I don't like the knots... too rustic looking for our likes.

We are going to apply a dark stain (ebony or espresso). I'm now thinking of using birch, but you mention you use it only for painting... whats the reasoning behind this.

Thanks
stale is offline  
post #386 of 1408 Old 01-29-2005, 01:18 PM
Senior Member
 
Kenlex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: MA
Posts: 265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I don't do a lot of dark staining, but as I understand it, birch tends not to take stain evenly. Perhaps someone with more experience than I can advise on that.
Kenlex is offline  
post #387 of 1408 Old 01-30-2005, 05:34 AM
Member
 
trtinkerer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NY
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Be aware that solid wood expands and contracts with humidity changes. This could be as much as 1/4 inch on a 24 inch wide piece. When constucting with solid wood, the rule is do not cross the grain of the wood. Wood expands in width, so put all the grain going in the same direction so the whole unit expands in the same dimension. Plywood is much more stable, so you should not have to worry about expansionn general for plywood.

Yes, birch does take stain unevenly. There are techniques to minimize this, but i don't remember them off hand. Try looking in Fiine Woodworking for staining advise, they had a good article about it a year or so ago. I don't stain that much, just varnish.

Tearout on plywwod is common. Using masking tape on the bottom of the board does help, but does not always work. I use an 80 tooth Freud blade ans still get some tearout with masking tape. The top of the board does not gte torn out on a ttable saw, the bottom does. When using a circular saw, the opposite is true, the top gets torn and the bottom is smooth. The side the cutting edge of the blade exits is the side of the wood that gets tornout.
trtinkerer is offline  
post #388 of 1408 Old 01-30-2005, 05:34 AM
Member
 
trtinkerer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NY
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Be aware that solid wood expands and contracts with humidity changes. This could be as much as 1/4 inch on a 24 inch wide piece. When constucting with solid wood, the rule is do not cross the grain of the wood. Wood expands in width, so put all the grain going in the same direction so the whole unit expands in the same dimension. Plywood is much more stable, so you should not have to worry about expansionn general for plywood.

Yes, birch does take stain unevenly. There are techniques to minimize this, but i don't remember them off hand. Try looking in Fiine Woodworking for staining advise, they had a good article about it a year or so ago. I don't stain that much, just varnish.

Tearout on plywwod is common. Using masking tape on the bottom of the board does help, but does not always work. I use an 80 tooth Freud blade ans still get some tearout with masking tape. The top of the board does not gte torn out on a ttable saw, the bottom does. When using a circular saw, the opposite is true, the top gets torn and the bottom is smooth. The side the cutting edge of the blade exits is the side of the wood that gets tornout.
trtinkerer is offline  
post #389 of 1408 Old 01-31-2005, 05:42 PM
Member
 
Pablopsd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Southeastern MA
Posts: 131
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Kenlex,
Yes you can use special fasteners and stuff for the MDF, but I do tend to overbuild. MDF won't be any good for shelves, as they will bend over time with weight. 3/4 PW is much stronger. Everything I build has to pass the Fat Carpenter Test! It has to hold me or my partner! If it's mounted on the wall, it too has to hold me! I am not going to take that chance with MDF. I don't want to get hurt!
As far as birch for painting and not staining. Around this area, most if not all kitchen cabinets from the 60's and 70's were built in place using Birch lumber core, or plywood. Most of the time they were stained. I have used dark stains on birch myself, such as Walnut Minwax, and also another Yield House stain to match some stuff at my mother's that my Dad built years ago. I never had any issues with it. You will see much more variations in grain with Pine in dark stains than Birch in my opinion. Especially with some of the pine products you get from HD. This Rosetta Pine that they are selling now has a very strong grain pattern. Really shows with dark stains. Sorry for the long winded post!

Pablo
Pablopsd is offline  
post #390 of 1408 Old 01-31-2005, 05:56 PM
Member
 
Pablopsd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Southeastern MA
Posts: 131
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Stale,
If you do decide to use solids for the top, don't glue it to the sides. It was a common practice "back in the day" to let the top "float" with expansion and contraction. I have used cleats inside the cabinet and screw the tops down from underneath. As the humidity changes, the top has the freedom to move independently. If you go and look at some dining room table and the such, the tops usually are screwed down, sometimes with the screws going through slots in the cleats as opposed to holes. If you ever watch New Yankee Workshop, you will see Norm do this too! I wish that I had used solids on the top of the project I am working on now. I made a last minute design change during construction which caused me to go a different route. I might still change it, but I am using Cherry. Good chunk of money for the top, and I have to find some nice materials too.

Pablo
Pablopsd is offline  
Reply Rear Projection Units

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off