Build You Own (BYO) TV Stand - Page 14 - AVS Forum
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post #391 of 1435 Old 01-31-2005, 07:33 PM
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Quote:


Originally posted by Pablopsd
MDF won't be any good for shelves, as they will bend over time with weight. 3/4 PW is much stronger.

...

As far as birch for painting and not staining. Around this area, most if not all kitchen cabinets from the 60's and 70's were built in place using Birch lumber core, or plywood. Most of the time they were stained. I have used dark stains on birch myself, such as Walnut Minwax, and also another Yield House stain to match some stuff at my mother's that my Dad built years ago. I never had any issues with it.

Excellent points, Pablo.

You're right about MDF bending--but it depends on the span. The top shelf of my stand for my Sony 25" TV has a 26" span AND, MORE IMPORTANTLY, the "feet" of the TV put the weight way out towards the side supports. So, there is no weight on the center of the span, and no bending whatsoever.

Built-in-place birch cabinets -- ah, yes. My Dad built himself a kitchen full of those in the '50s. With modern finishes, it's probably different, but he left his unstained and simply varnished them, and the whole shebang had a decidedly yellow cast after awhile. I've been doing my work lately in natural maple ply finished with Minwax Polycrylic, which is a very clear finish that doesn't darken or yellow.
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post #392 of 1435 Old 01-31-2005, 07:34 PM
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YEP
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post #393 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 06:26 AM
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Using MDF for anything except a outhouse should be avoided. Same goes for OSB!

Both cheap, and you get what you pay for...............

.
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post #394 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 07:36 AM
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Quote:


Originally posted by Pablopsd
Stale,
If you do decide to use solids for the top, don't glue it to the sides. It was a common practice "back in the day" to let the top "float" with expansion and contraction. I have used cleats inside the cabinet and screw the tops down from underneath. As the humidity changes, the top has the freedom to move independently. Pablo


Does plywood expand as much as solid? I uderstand that plywood might be more stable given the layers. I used glue and biscuits to attach the top to the sides and center dividers of my stand. Is that going to be a problem later?
LL
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post #395 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 08:10 AM
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Quote:


Originally posted by Pine2
Does plywood expand as much as solid? I uderstand that plywood might be more stable given the layers.

Plywood is more stable because the grain of each ply runs perpendicular to the grain of the next.
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post #396 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 09:08 AM
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I think I've decided to go for birch plywood. We've done some staining tests and I like the results.

The only problem is HD, Lowes, and DixieLine do not seem to carry birch molding. I wanted to use a little to coverup the horizontal edges, and birch edging tape (?) to do the verticals...
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post #397 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 10:57 AM
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What a great idea. I did that this past summer to prepare for my HDTV. I used oak plywood with the iron on oak edging (quite easy to use) For the uprights I used 1.5"extruded aluminum from 8020.net. The adjustable center shelves are sealed and painted MDF. My wife loved it. Total cost was about $200. If you count the cost of the table saw that adds another $300.

Now all it needs is a HDTV

Cheers
Joeren

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post #398 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 11:00 AM
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Oh. BTW. I'm new to this site and have been reading the posts for about a week. Lot's of very good information. Thanks
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post #399 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 11:22 AM
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Stale,
I have used a combo of pine with birch PW, and dark stains. It worked for me. Try to use a native soft pine though, nice grain. Get a scrap and test it out. Don't know where you are, but we have a lot of scraps from the job daily here in MA!

Pablo
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post #400 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 12:05 PM
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Quote:


Originally posted by joeren
What a great idea. I did that this past summer to prepare for my HDTV. I used oak plywood with the iron on oak edging (quite easy to use) For the uprights I used 1.5"extruded aluminum from 8020.net. The adjustable center shelves are sealed and painted MDF. My wife loved it. Total cost was about $200. If you count the cost of the table saw that adds another $300.

Now all it needs is a HDTV

Cheers
Joeren

That is the best "knock-off" (and I mean that as a sincere compliment) of a Salamander Triple 20 that I've ever seen! At a fraction of the cost. Can you get door hinges that will attach to the 8020.net aluminum posts? Just great!
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post #401 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 12:14 PM
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They have everything you can imagine at 8020.net. Thanks for the compliment. I just couldn't see paying $850.

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post #402 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 12:44 PM
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Quote:


Originally posted by stale
I've attached a drawing of what I'm thinking of building. Don't pay too much attention to the numbers I threw on there. I'm thinking the rough dimensions would be 64Wx22Hx20D. I'm planning on getting the Sony 55WF or XS to fill the space. And the drawers should allow for DVDs and manuals.
-stale [/b]

Nice design, I'm trying to figure out how you are going to make it 22 high with those drawers - I figured with top, bottom, shelf, footings of some sort that squeaking out 15 inches or so without drawers was pretty tough. Do your measurements add up?
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post #403 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 03:07 PM
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Quote:


Originally posted by joeren
What a great idea. I did that this past summer to prepare for my HDTV. I used oak plywood with the iron on oak edging (quite easy to use) For the uprights I used 1.5"extruded aluminum from 8020.net. The adjustable center shelves are sealed and painted MDF. My wife loved it. Total cost was about $200. If you count the cost of the table saw that adds another $300.

Now all it needs is a HDTV

Cheers
Joeren

Nice! I have been thinking of building exactly this using the same 8020. You have any other pics or details?

Ernie
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post #404 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 04:27 PM
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The dimentions are close to the Salamander designs triple 20. I called them to see if they would make one a little shorter. They wouldn't do it. So I built my own. During the process I decided to put the center channel speaker in the shelf below the TV so I built it to roughly the same dimentions as the Salamander. I'll dig up what I can of my plans and post them soon. I have to travel tomorrow so it won't be until Friday or Saturday.
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post #405 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 07:04 PM
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Quote:


Originally posted by timdlp
Nice design, I'm trying to figure out how you are going to make it 22 high with those drawers - I figured with top, bottom, shelf, footings of some sort that squeaking out 15 inches or so without drawers was pretty tough. Do your measurements add up?

Hey, thanks for looking at this.

The Heights add up like this:

7" - Drawers for DVDs
7" - Middle shelf for Center Speaker, HtPC and Receiver
4.5" - Top shelf for Tivo, DVD and VCR
1" - feet
4x0.75" - height of shelves
-------
22.5"

The tightest component is my receiver which is 6.5" tall. This might be a little too tight... but I suppose I can forget the top shelves and stack the components.
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post #406 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 07:39 PM
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Stale-

Give the reciever some room about to cool off. 1/2 inch even 1 1/14 inches above a receiver is not sufficient venting to cool a receiver. At these close distances you had better get used to replacing your burned out receiver. A fan may help, but I would give it 2-3 inches minimum. DVD players and VCRs do not give off near the heat a receiver or Satelite box does, so they can live at closer quarters than a reveiver.
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post #407 of 1435 Old 02-01-2005, 10:49 PM
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Quote:


Originally posted by trtinkerer
Stale-

Give the reciever some room about to cool off. 1/2 inch even 1 1/14 inches above a receiver is not sufficient venting to cool a receiver. At these close distances you had better get used to replacing your burned out receiver. A fan may help, but I would give it 2-3 inches minimum. DVD players and VCRs do not give off near the heat a receiver or Satelite box does, so they can live at closer quarters than a reveiver.

Yeah... thats what I was afraid of. I need good circulation for my htpc as well. Thats one reason I was going to have slots on the sides... but its probably not enough.
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post #408 of 1435 Old 02-02-2005, 08:03 AM - Thread Starter
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Stale...

Welcome to the thread. Depending on what you're looking for in the way of edging plywood, HD & Lowes have some possibilities. HD has iron on birch edging which worked out fine for me. I also believe I saw some cherry or alder/basswood (?) edge molding there, but it was ¾" shelf molding and contoured. If you have a tablesaw, you can buy some solid ¾" wood and cut strips. I was looking for a contemporary style, so I didn't want any rounded or detailed trim... so I had to settle for the oak. But the end result worked out fine with my dark stain. The oak grain isn't as predominant as one would think.

As far as staining birch plywood/solids goes... take it from me, it's not easy but it can be done. After struggling to get a particular shade (rosewood), I finally learned that you should try some samples and assume nothing. But assuming you have the cabinet built, and you might be using a water-based dye stain, here's the general process that worked for me:

1. Sand and vacumn the wood and only use a long hair brush to vacumn. Anthing rubbing on wood can leave a hidden mark that will show up later.
2. With a damp rag, wipe down the wood to raise the grain, then wait for it to dry and repeat the sanding/vacumn process.
3. Apply a Wood Conditioner with a brush (not a sealer), and while wet/damp, you start applying the stain doing a section at a time.
4. Let the stain set up but wipe it up to get the desired look, and let it dry overnight. Don't let it sit on the wood too long or you won't be able to keep it even-looking.
5. Get some _crystal clear_ Bullseye pure Shellac and dilute it 50/50 with denatured alcohol, and brush it on.
6. Use a water-based urethane and apply 2-3 coats, letting each coat dry maybe 4-6 hours. In between coats, use a fiber pad to lightly scuff the surface and remove any irregularities.

Again, this worked out OK for me. My stand is made with birch plywood and oak trim (horizontals) and birch banding on the verticals. You can go back in this thread and see just about every (agonizing... just ask Pablo) step and mis-step I went through. But definitely do some sample pieces to get color and finish before diving in.

Quote:


Originally posted by stale
I think I've decided to go for birch plywood. We've done some staining tests and I like the results.

The only problem is HD, Lowes, and DixieLine do not seem to carry birch molding. I wanted to use a little to coverup the horizontal edges, and birch edging tape (?) to do the verticals...


Iron Horse

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post #409 of 1435 Old 02-04-2005, 01:54 PM
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Any software recommendations for making a schematic drawing? Plus maybe the ability to do a 3d view?

Ernie
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post #410 of 1435 Old 02-04-2005, 02:13 PM
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Here's a drawing using Microsoft Visio. I custom made my shelf and scaled pictures of my equipment before I even built the thing so I knew where everything would go. (A lot easier to drag pictures over with a mouse) The plywood is oak with iron on edging, stained to match my speakers. Most dimensions are in the drawing. Salamander used to have a detailed drawing on their web page but it doesn't look like it's there any longer. 8020 is easy to work with and they will cut to length and tap the ends for you if you want. I did all that myself. For hardware I used 8020 corner brackets 1" for the adjustable shelves. All of the other hardware, welding nuts, furniture slides, flanged button head bolts. I got online from McMaster Carr. If I find the pdf of Salamanders I will email it to you.

Joeren
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post #411 of 1435 Old 02-04-2005, 02:15 PM
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without adjustable shelves
LL
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post #412 of 1435 Old 02-04-2005, 02:19 PM
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Thanks Joeren! Really nice the way it turned out. Oh when you say that they can cut it to length and tap it, did you that your self? If so what did you use to cut it?

Ernie
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post #413 of 1435 Old 02-04-2005, 03:33 PM
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Joeren,

Thanks for the info and the pictures. I was thinking of doing the same thing with the ITEM MB kit products. They can be found at www.itemAmerica.com. I am not sure of the pricing but I will check. Thanks again for the information and inspiration.
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post #414 of 1435 Old 02-05-2005, 06:08 AM
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I purchased some scrap pieces from work (few minor dings and scratches) and actually had someone cut it for me in the shop. I think they used a good band chop saw. The center hole runs the length of the extrusion and is the correct diameter for a 5/16 tap. The ITEM products can be used just as easily and are less expensive. ITEM also has the black anodized extrusions which 8020 charges an arm and a leg for. I went with the 8020 because I got it cheap.
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post #415 of 1435 Old 02-06-2005, 07:29 PM
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I have bought some molding for a face frame. The molding is 1/8-1/4 too wide. What is the best way to shave off the molding so it fits perfectly? I don't have a table saw, I'm worried that the jig saw would be to uneven, and I'm sure I can't do a straight cut with circular saw.

Optionally I could buy a belt sander and sand it down... don't know if my orbital would be sufficient for the job.
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post #416 of 1435 Old 02-07-2005, 04:57 AM
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If you are going to sand off that much, I would use a belt sander. CAUTION!!!! If you are not careful, you WILL sand through the veneer on the plywood that you are trying to edge VERY EASY!!! You could also use a flush trimming bit in a router, but that has its issues as well, such as ripping the moulding apart. If the grain of the molding is funky, the bit could just tear it apart. You could also glue and/or nail a small piece of wood under the PW to make it the same thickness or a little bigger than the molding. Not knowing the design, don't know if this would work. But no tablesaw to make this either. Time to go buy one!! :-)

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post #417 of 1435 Old 02-07-2005, 07:38 AM
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[quote]Originally posted by stale
I have bought some molding for a face frame. The molding is 1/8-1/4 too wide. What is the best way to shave off the molding so it fits perfectly? I don't have a table saw, I'm worried that the jig saw would be to uneven, and I'm sure I can't do a straight cut with circular saw.

Optionally I could buy a belt sander and sand it down... don't know if my orbital would be sufficient for the job.
[/QUOTE

Like Pablopsd said, be real careful sanding that close to the veneer, you can go right through before you realize. I would switch to a sanding block once you approach the edge for control. The alternative is that you just leave the 1/8-1/4 overhang and center the moulding. Many cabinets like this are built with a faceframe, which gives the unit edges a thicker look from the front. Although a wider overhang is more normal.
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post #418 of 1435 Old 02-07-2005, 07:56 AM
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The stand is just about done. Maybe one more coat of Miniwax wipe-on poly and the main frame and doors will be complete. I still have to make the shelves, but that should be a weekender. These pics are just before and just after staining with no top coat.
LL
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post #419 of 1435 Old 02-07-2005, 07:58 AM
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Used 170 degree euro hinges from Rockler. The center is mortised to accept a black mesh of some type ala Salamander.
LL
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post #420 of 1435 Old 02-07-2005, 08:00 AM
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Solar-lux mahogany brown dye stain.
LL
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