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post #1201 of 1408 Old 09-13-2010, 02:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smitty2k1 View Post

I also could use some input on the following:
*Cabinet area: Does there seem to be enough breathing room for the Denon 789 AVR in the bottom middle? What should I do about the rear porting on my Ascend center channel?
*Cable management: I can't really cut holes in the back on the side compartments.
*Back material: I'm thinking it will have to be more plywood or MDF because of the very exposed sides
*Feet or wheels? I like the sturdiness and look of feet but the ease of moving on wheels.
*Doors for the sides: I think glass doors are right out for DIY with the rounded edges. What about speaker fabric over a curved frame. Any experience with that?

#1) Dunno since you don't list a depth, but top and sides are more important so you should be OK.

#2) I don't see why you can't cut holes in the back for the sides, but if you really don't want to, cut 2" squares out in the back corners of the shelves/bottom for the side compartments (near the center dividers) and run wires through them down to the floor then back out wherever. Or do like moonhawk said and go through the center dividers.

#3) Use 1/4" plywood and paint/stain/finish it to match. If you're painting you can use cheaper wood.

#4) Feet. You're going to have to take everything off it when you move it around anyways

#5) Depends on how fancy you wanna get. You could do no doors at all, your speaker fabric idea, use thin flexible acrylic instead of glass, or my personal favorite I just came up with - figure out a way to rig up a roll top-desk like thing that goes to the sides.
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post #1202 of 1408 Old 09-15-2010, 05:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moonhawk View Post

Can you cut holes in the vertical front to back dividers and run the cables from the components in the side partitions through those and out the back?

Oh good idea, thanks!

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Originally Posted by NOAMattD View Post

#1) Dunno since you don't list a depth, but top and sides are more important so you should be OK.

#2) I don't see why you can't cut holes in the back for the sides, but if you really don't want to, cut 2" squares out in the back corners of the shelves/bottom for the side compartments (near the center dividers) and run wires through them down to the floor then back out wherever. Or do like moonhawk said and go through the center dividers.

#3) Use 1/4" plywood and paint/stain/finish it to match. If you're painting you can use cheaper wood.

#4) Feet. You're going to have to take everything off it when you move it around anyways

#5) Depends on how fancy you wanna get. You could do no doors at all, your speaker fabric idea, use thin flexible acrylic instead of glass, or my personal favorite I just came up with - figure out a way to rig up a roll top-desk like thing that goes to the sides.

24" deep.

Do you have any pictures or articles that discuss curved doors?
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post #1203 of 1408 Old 09-16-2010, 10:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Beerce View Post

If you don't mind, may I ask you a little bit more about the details of your construction?

1. What are its dimensions? L x W x D
2. I like the wood trim on the top surface, how is this fastened to the plywood of the top surface? (biscuits?, glue?) Also, where does the far outside vertical "wall" come into contact with this top surface assembly (what does the plywood/trim top surface "sit" on). i.e. is the plywood/trim half-on/half-off on that vertical piece?

If you can answer these it'd be swell, and if you want, you can mention any other details of its construction... You can sort of see what I'm getting at by these questions - I'm unfamiliar with the different methods of fastening/assembling.

Sorry for the delay in getting back been a busy month.

1. L=80",H=26",D=23.5"
2. The top trim is actually 1" thick oak attached with bisquits to the 3/4"plywood. The trim sets on the outside border of the case and I have the back and inside walls shimmed with a 1/4' strip.

I used a combination of biscuits and screws to assemble the whole thing. Fortunately the layout and trim hide almost all of the screws. I meant to take more pictures during assembly but every time I went out to the garage I just wanted to dig right into the work.

Frank
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post #1204 of 1408 Old 09-17-2010, 05:14 AM
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Originally Posted by fbalonis View Post

Sorry for the delay in getting back been a busy month.

1. L=80",H=26",D=23.5"
2. The top trim is actually 1" thick oak attached with bisquits to the 3/4"plywood. The trim sets on the outside border of the case and I have the back and inside walls shimmed with a 1/4' strip.

I used a combination of biscuits and screws to assemble the whole thing. Fortunately the layout and trim hide almost all of the screws. I meant to take more pictures during assembly but every time I went out to the garage I just wanted to dig right into the work.

Frank

Thanks for the response, I think I know what you did now. I was wondering about the 1" trim on the 3/4" plywood, but the shims make sense. You said the trim sits on the outside perimeter, so this means your plywood top is floating (i.e. only supported by biscuits) everywhere except where it sits on the two center dividers, correct? Of course this is fine, structurally; I'm just curious in terms of assembly.

Also, if you don't mind, could you tell me a bit more about the construction of your two outside vertical pieces? It looks like you have a 2x4 or something similar for the "leg", and you've managed to get some depth in the side panel. Looking at the far end if your picture though, it looks like everything on the inside of your panel is almost flush. Did you router out the 2x4 into an "L" shape so that you could put the plywood into the notch? That's the approach I've taken in my design, but I'm not sure if there's an easier way... I've got my unit designed in 3D software right now haha, but just cause it works there doesn't mean I've chosen the best/easiest construction methods.

See my attachments for some views of the 3D model. It has some similarities to yours, but I've put my own preferences for "lines" and depths, no two things sitting in the same plane really. I also like the appearance of 4 standout "post-like" legs, and the trim on my top surface is only on 3 sides, being flush at the back. And it has doors with glass inserted. Also see the view of the cutouts in the 2x4 and the lower plywood surface to see what I mean by cutting out the legs in order to get the recessed appearance on the side panels. This is the best method I could think of to get that appearance, but I'm a woodworking noob, so I am likely mistaken...
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post #1205 of 1408 Old 09-20-2010, 06:32 PM
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Thanks for inspiring me! After searching for years I just finally broke down and built what I wanted. Got three BRK14 knockdown laminated racks from Middle Atlantic. Bolted them together and sandwiched them between two pieces of inch and a half wood finished to my liking. Added some fat feet and ended up with exactly what I was looking for. Obviously this could have tremendous variations depending on the look you are going for. And the racks are available in a large variety of heights and a few finishes. I already had tons a rock hardware (shelves, bolts, etc) so that didn't add to my final cost.

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post #1206 of 1408 Old 09-20-2010, 07:02 PM
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Very nice, and unique too!

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post #1207 of 1408 Old 09-20-2010, 08:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Chemist View Post

Thanks for inspiring me! After searching for years I just finally broke down and built what I wanted. Got three BRK14 knockdown laminated racks from Middle Atlantic. Bolted them together and sandwiched them between two pieces of inch and a half wood finished to my liking. Added some fat feet and ended up with exactly what I was looking for. Obviously this could have tremendous variations depending on the look you are going for. And the racks are available in a large variety of heights and a few finishes. I already had tons a rock hardware (shelves, bolts, etc) so that didn't add to my final cost.


That's a pretty clever solution that looks great. Nice job.
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post #1208 of 1408 Old 09-30-2010, 11:07 AM
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I think my favorite part of your build is how well it syncs with your username

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Chemist View Post

Thanks for inspiring me! After searching for years I just finally broke down and built what I wanted. Got three BRK14 knockdown laminated racks from Middle Atlantic. Bolted them together and sandwiched them between two pieces of inch and a half wood finished to my liking. Added some fat feet and ended up with exactly what I was looking for. Obviously this could have tremendous variations depending on the look you are going for. And the racks are available in a large variety of heights and a few finishes. I already had tons a rock hardware (shelves, bolts, etc) so that didn't add to my final cost.

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post #1209 of 1408 Old 10-14-2010, 06:37 PM
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Anyone have any experience with laminated veneer lumber? I have been watching some vids on diy network and they talk about using them. Do they look nice? anydrawbacks?

also

Anyone have any experience with the multi tools? like this

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00917438000P

i know other companies make similar tools... anyway, I was wondering if they could be use to make biscuit holes? I don't want to spend $170-$200 on a biscuit cuter that will get used very little if ever again... if the multi toll can do it.. it is a little cheaper and I would prob use it again for other stuff.

My thought is yes, but i have no idea how accurate or precise the multi tools cut.


Thank you
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post #1210 of 1408 Old 10-14-2010, 07:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by porsche1207 View Post

Anyone have any experience with laminated veneer lumber? I have been watching some vids on diy network and they talk about using them. Do they look nice? anydrawbacks?

also

Anyone have any experience with the multi tools? like this

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00917438000P

i know other companies make similar tools... anyway, I was wondering if they could be use to make biscuit holes? I don't want to spend $170-$200 on a biscuit cuter that will get used very little if ever again... if the multi toll can do it.. it is a little cheaper and I would prob use it again for other stuff.

My thought is yes, but i have no idea how accurate or precise the multi tools cut.


Thank you

I don't recommend this tool for doing biscuits. Biscuits need to be accurately placed as far as the thickness of the piece and the spacing along the edge. I recommend using a router if you don't want to spring for the biscuit slot cutter. You can get pretty accurate with the depth, but spacing will still be a bit tough.
If you want to join two pieces and not use a slot cutter, you can use splines. You use a router with a slot cutting bit and run a length of the boards. You don't need to be quite as accurate w.r.t. length as in the slot for a biscuit. Make a spline on the table saw and glue them together.
Next option is glue and clamps. Works well with lengths of boards, but not so well if you're gluing up miters. Use the splines or biscuits.
Slots can also be cut on a table saw for inserting splines.
Don't scrimp on the clamps no matter how you choose to joint the material. Fact is, lengths of lumber can just be glued up with adequate clamping.

The laminated lumber is a substitute for 2x4s etc if I remember correctly. Not sure where they would play in your design. Laminated wood usually does not take screws or nails as good as solid lumber. As far as looks, I'm not familiar with what the outer layers look like.
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post #1211 of 1408 Old 10-14-2010, 07:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by porsche1207 View Post

Anyone have any experience with laminated veneer lumber? I have been watching some vids on diy network and they talk about using them. Do they look nice? anydrawbacks?

also

Anyone have any experience with the multi tools? like this

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00917438000P

i know other companies make similar tools... anyway, I was wondering if they could be use to make biscuit holes? I don't want to spend $170-$200 on a biscuit cuter that will get used very little if ever again... if the multi toll can do it.. it is a little cheaper and I would prob use it again for other stuff.

My thought is yes, but i have no idea how accurate or precise the multi tools cut.


Thank you

Hardwood plywood is great stuff. Only drawbacks are edge treatments required, and the choice hardwood veneer on the finish layer can be pretty thin, so you have to be careful you don't go crazy sanding. The interior laminations tends to be cheaper hardwoods. Advantages -cost, don't need to glue-up to make wide boards, comes perfectly square, no warping.

Ultimately I end up using both, for example plywood for the large surfaces, and solid hardwood sticks for facing, rails & stiles, trim, legs, etc.

That kind of multi-tool looks interesting, I'm thinking of getting one. Dremel's is more reasonably priced than Craftsman. No way you do biscuit holes with that though. You can buy a biscuit bit for a router, which you probably will want anyway for other tasks. The multitool looks more like a home handyman tool than a furniture-making tool.

Take a look at pocket hole jigs too, they are not too $$ and can do many of the same things biscuits do. If you want to go dirt cheap, you can also look at a doweling jig.
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post #1212 of 1408 Old 10-14-2010, 10:09 PM
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Thanks for the quick responses Billybobg and ChuckF

I didn't know LVL wasn't an option on large surfaces so that takes care of that quick.

As far as the biscuit holes.. I had thought of using a router on the boards that will be laying horizontal but I will have 6 sides of boards going verticle that i think will be the biggest issue.

http://www.standoutdesigns.com/store...ole-10p322.htm

I am doing a design close to this one from standout cept I want 3 drawers at the bottom of each area. So the board going across the top of the draw can be cut on the side easy (from what i have seen on videos since I have never used a router) but the slots i need to make in the verticle boards about 7 inchs from the bottom is where I think will be the problem. Unless there is a bit for the router that I can also use there.

I will need to research pocket hole jigs to see if that will work.

Thanks
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post #1213 of 1408 Old 10-15-2010, 12:38 AM
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If your reasons for wanting to use biscuits, is because you think it will make it stronger. No, that's not what they are for, they do not add much strength at all. They are primarily used to help line up, and hold something when clamped in the proper position while the glue drys. You can certainly make it without biscuits, it will just be a bit harder to clamp it up, and still hold the pieces in position without moving. As mentioned, you could also use dowels, a simple dowel jig is far cheaper than a biscuit cutter. Pocket holes may work also, but probably are also not be the best way to go. Renting a brad nailer might be a option, loosely clamp it up with glue, line it all up, tighten up the clamps and zap some brad nails in it to hold it in proper position while the glue drys. Actually, a really good tool rental store may even have biscuit cutters available for rent.
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post #1214 of 1408 Old 10-15-2010, 06:49 AM
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I was thinking the biscuits would make the shelf and the molding stronger or more secure then just glue... if glue is enough to hold components,, I could just use that. I might look to see how much weight the glue will hold.
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post #1215 of 1408 Old 10-15-2010, 10:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by porsche1207 View Post

I was thinking the biscuits would make the shelf and the molding stronger or more secure then just glue... if glue is enough to hold components,, I could just use that. I might look to see how much weight the glue will hold.

Biscuts, dowels, slots and the like are really just for alignment in face frames. There's no shear force or pulling forces on the frame so once you've got it assembled with your pocket screws/dowels/whatever you just need a way to align it to the carcass and hold in in place while your glue dries. That's what brads/finish nails are actually used for.

Now for SHELVES you need shear strength which is why you use dadoes, screws and shelf pins in addition to your glue.
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post #1216 of 1408 Old 11-22-2010, 04:49 PM
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Just came across this thread. Some really great stuff here.

I'm planning on building a N702+ clone, hopefully sometime next month. For those that are interested, I've created a 3-D model and made it available here: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1291665
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post #1217 of 1408 Old 11-22-2010, 05:16 PM
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Looks like it will be great. Since you're building it yourself, you can make the dimensions anything you want though. 24.5" tall might be a bit high for your display.

"The dream never dies, just the dreamer."

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post #1218 of 1408 Old 11-23-2010, 07:46 AM
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Looks like it will be great. Since you're building it yourself, you can make the dimensions anything you want though. 24.5" tall might be a bit high for your display.

I realize I can customize, but this form factor fits the bill perfectly. Looking forward to the build process.
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post #1219 of 1408 Old 11-24-2010, 02:15 AM
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Has anyone tried implementing a shelf that can slide out almost like a drawer for the receiver shelf? Seems like that would make any changes a little easier but maybe there is another reason nobody seems to do it.
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post #1220 of 1408 Old 11-24-2010, 07:07 AM
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Has anyone tried implementing a shelf that can slide out almost like a drawer for the receiver shelf? Seems like that would make any changes a little easier but maybe there is another reason nobody seems to do it.

Two issues come to mind:

1 vibration control/rattling of slide mechanisms.

2 tugging on cables/connectors when sliding shelves out.

If you can design around these, I don't see any other reason not too.

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post #1221 of 1408 Old 12-11-2010, 11:06 PM
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Hi, Just joined after lurking around for quite some time. Here is the unit I constructed for our Mits 82837. Imaging is compromised a bit on the speakers but the WAF is off the chart. I was making some drawings to construct a unit for our old 65" and mentioned I would make it for a larger unit and use filler panels. While constructing the unit my wife suprised me by ordering the new 82". I used black melamine to make the frameless cabinets and shelves. I took the easy way out and ordered prefinished doors and veneer to keep the finish consistent. The front edges and open areas are trimmed with veneer and plywood. Had the glass cut locally and installed grill cloth in speaker openings. Used full length drawer slides and quality hinges. Still have not decided an any exterior harware. The whole unit has active ventilation controlled by thermostats. It is not perfect but I think it turned out well for my first plunge into furniture. thanks for looking

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post #1222 of 1408 Old 12-12-2010, 12:54 AM
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It is not perfect but I think it turned out well for my first plunge into furniture. thanks for looking
I think your underestimating how good it is, and also how good you were at building it. That looks fantastic!
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post #1223 of 1408 Old 12-12-2010, 07:07 AM
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I think your underestimating how good it is, and also how good you were at building it. That looks fantastic!

I concur ... for a DIY that is incredible.
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post #1224 of 1408 Old 12-12-2010, 07:30 AM
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Hi, Just joined after lurking around for quite some time. Here is the unit I constructed for our Mits 82837. Imaging is compromised a bit on the speakers but the WAF is off the chart. I was making some drawings to construct a unit for our old 65" and mentioned I would make it for a larger unit and use filler panels. While constructing the unit my wife suprised me by ordering the new 82". I used black melamine to make the frameless cabinets and shelves. I took the easy way out and ordered prefinished doors and veneer to keep the finish consistent. The front edges and open areas are trimmed with veneer and plywood. Had the glass cut locally and installed grill cloth in speaker openings. Used full length drawer slides and quality hinges. Still have not decided an any exterior harware. The whole unit has active ventilation controlled by thermostats. It is not perfect but I think it turned out well for my first plunge into furniture. thanks for looking

Richard

VERY nice, Richard. Welcome to the forum.

What kind of joinery did you do on the casework?

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post #1225 of 1408 Old 12-12-2010, 11:40 PM
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Thanks for the welcome and for the comments. I honestly surprised myself a bit with the results. My wife loves it, no more visible wires or components and my old Polk speakers are hidden that I did not want to part with. As far as cabinet construction I kept it very simple. I assembled the individual structures together using glue and my finish nailer including nailing the 1/4" backs with a brad nailer. To further reinforce I countersunk screws into the tops,bottoms and fixed shelves from the sides. Seeing as the sides are not visible this seemed the easiest route. The individual cabinets are held together with through bolts at the front edges and it is screwed to the wall of course. The lower right is the sub and the lower left is just a drawer. The doors above the speakers pull out to expose DVD, BluRay and game storage. I assembled the storage racks and drawers the same way as the cabinets. I thought that dovetail or biscuits would be kind of useless as melamine is pretty much particle board. I look forward to maybe contributing a bit now that I have joined. BTW the base is 18" tall, I see a lot of questions regarding height with these tv's.

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post #1226 of 1408 Old 12-29-2010, 08:07 AM
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Hi all. I have been lurking for some time in this thread and others and I finally am taking on the home theater and have a question. I think I am going to try to build a built in entertainment center and this thread has been very helpful to get ideas. I have intermediate skills with wood working, but have a coworker who can help out with advice. My question is about the sub. I have heard you definitely don't want it in your stand or ec, but was wondering about if its in the ec, but on the floor. Basically I was thinking about a bay on the right side to house the sub that would have the base cut out so the sub sat on the floor. Its a front facing sub. Thanks for any advice.
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post #1227 of 1408 Old 12-29-2010, 09:51 AM
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Hi all. I have been lurking for some time in this thread and others and I finally am taking on the home theater and have a question. I think I am going to try to build a built in entertainment center and this thread has been very helpful to get ideas. I have intermediate skills with wood working, but have a coworker who can help out with advice. My question is about the sub. I have heard you definitely don't want it in your stand or ec, but was wondering about if its in the ec, but on the floor. Basically I was thinking about a bay on the right side to house the sub that would have the base cut out so the sub sat on the floor. Its a front facing sub. Thanks for any advice.

That will solve the problem of vibration w/regard to your other components--at least to some degree.

But, you should be aware that subwoofer placement is critical to sub performance, so I suggest you do some homework in the subwoofer forum or elsewhere before committing to a permanent built-in location.

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post #1228 of 1408 Old 12-29-2010, 11:15 AM
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Originally Posted by moonhawk View Post


That will solve the problem of vibration w/regard to your other components--at least to some degree.

But, you should be aware that subwoofer placement is critical to sub performance, so I suggest you do some homework in the subwoofer forum or elsewhere before committing to a permanent built-in location.

He is dead on. Placement is key and while that will likely change when you build the cabinet, it is better to at least experiment beforehand. Additionally, I would give at least 3" on each side of the sub for clearance. It would probably be good to check with the manufacturer as well. Where is the sub ported? I would definitely not limit yourself in the sub area to allow for future upgrades. It would be silly to do all of that work for a sub that didn't perform
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post #1229 of 1408 Old 12-29-2010, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by RDKing2 View Post

Hi, Just joined after lurking around for quite some time. Here is the unit I constructed for our Mits 82837. Imaging is compromised a bit on the speakers but the WAF is off the chart. I was making some drawings to construct a unit for our old 65" and mentioned I would make it for a larger unit and use filler panels. While constructing the unit my wife suprised me by ordering the new 82". I used black melamine to make the frameless cabinets and shelves. I took the easy way out and ordered prefinished doors and veneer to keep the finish consistent. The front edges and open areas are trimmed with veneer and plywood. Had the glass cut locally and installed grill cloth in speaker openings. Used full length drawer slides and quality hinges. Still have not decided an any exterior harware. The whole unit has active ventilation controlled by thermostats. It is not perfect but I think it turned out well for my first plunge into furniture. thanks for looking

Richard

That is just insanely awesome. Well done!
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post #1230 of 1408 Old 12-29-2010, 10:41 PM
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What a wonderful thread. I am considering putting one together as well. I saw the Salamander Design clone earlier in this thread (great job, btw!) and think I might be able to pull it off. We have an HTPC that needs 20" shelf space and all the TV stands we could find were either too small or too expensive. Here is a preliminary render of the plan:




~27" high and 24" deep (22" interior). 48" wide. The two side cabinets have fabric and the center is smoked acrylic. I may also use a mesh of sorts for airflow there. The sides are sheets of opaque black polycarbonate/acrylic. I want to put my speakers inside with custom sections for them and have room for our HTPC, Wii, and anything else we might add. I plan to use 1" x 1" x 24" 80/20 Aluminum extrusion for the verticals and 3/4" wood for the top and bottom. Shelves can be of anything as they are never seen. I plan to take airflow and cable management into consideration as well.

Any input would be great.
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