Don't dump your CRT RPTV! - Page 424 - AVS Forum
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post #12691 of 12715 Old 10-13-2014, 06:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr Bob View Post
Yes. They take 5 amp fuse protectors, 1 for the negative voltage rail and one for the positive rail. Those 5 amp protectors often blow when the conv ICs croak and short out, no conv repair is complete without checking them. Which can be done in circuit with the power cord unplugged and the unit dead. If both don't show a dead short, in circuit or out, then the one that doesn't - that shows wide open on a continuity test - is blown.

The 1 and 3 amp fuses will be for something else. b
I checked all the fuses and each one had continuity.


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I am available for phone consultation, and have done this repair many many times on Mit's. On lots of different other brands too. Patterns begin to emerge when you have done it for as long as I have. I am your best shot at getting this done on your own. b
Looks like I will be contacting you.

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That's probably your master power fuse. If your set is operating at all, it's probably just fine. What's its value? Probably 8-10 amps.b
Yes it is the master power fuse rated at 5 amp.

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BTW, you stated that you cannot correct the 2 colors. This means you have not gone into the service mode. Which is good, doing so will not get you any further in this repair. But if you want to really trick out your set once it's working properly again, I can take you into the service mode on the phone and with texting me pictures, the difference I can help you create on your image will be absolutely stunning.b
Actually I did go into the service mode but made sure to put the values back. What I was trying to say is that in the advanced convergence menu the reset, red and blue do nothing to adjust the convergence.


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Your set is the oldest 16x9 HD set ever made by Mit, and yet still has lots of good years left in her. She's a magnificent set, with those incredible 9" guns like mine has. I hope you hang in there with her.b
I cannot agree more. She has been great since the day I brought her home. This is set used at least 5 hours a day during the week and 12 hours on the weekend for the past 14 years. The HD on this set nothing short of amazing.

Thanks
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post #12692 of 12715 Old 10-13-2014, 11:42 PM - Thread Starter
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Looking forward to hearing from you.



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post #12693 of 12715 Old 10-14-2014, 05:16 PM
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Not sure if this is allowed but some guy is giving away a 73" mits working crt on Craigslist in Chicago. I thought those things had 9" guns.
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post #12694 of 12715 Old 10-15-2014, 09:23 PM
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Forgive me if these questions have already been answered, a quick search hasn't revealed much and time is of the essence.

Are parts still available for RPTV's? How much should I expect to regularly spend to keep a RPTV functioning? I ask because I just came across a Pioneer Elite Pro-730HD, and Pioneer doesn't have replacement tubes anymore, along with the many other parts they show are unavailable. I found a class action legal settlement regarding "colored lines" on Pioneer x30 model tv's, is that still a common problem and was there a resolution?

Also, since I'm not tv tech knowledgable, what questions should I ask the seller? He's asking $200, says it's in excellent condition, but my concern is he's indicated that it's been stored in his garage for a timeframe I've yet to ascertain. He says it'll need recalibration, and recommends cleaning the tubes.

For background reference, I've only had CRT tv's and have always been disappointed in the picture quality of my friends flat-screens (not sure if led or plasmas, but surely not professionally calibrated). I'm now in need of a larger display so am days away from purchasing one of the last Samsung 1080p plasma tv's, but am concerned about its probable short lifespan and perhaps incomparable picture quality to that of a used CRT tv.

Also, I'm wishing to transition from my current 4:3 set to 16:9. Is there perhaps a different RPTV, or just a standard CRT I should be on the lookout for instead? Many thanks for any shared thoughts.

Last edited by tubetop; 10-15-2014 at 09:37 PM.
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post #12695 of 12715 Old 10-15-2014, 11:20 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by tubetop View Post
Forgive me if these questions have already been answered, a quick search hasn't revealed much and time is of the essence.

Are parts still available for RPTV's? How much should I expect to regularly spend to keep a RPTV functioning? I ask because I just came across a Pioneer Elite Pro-730HD, and Pioneer doesn't have replacement tubes anymore, along with the many other parts they show are unavailable. I found a class action legal settlement regarding "colored lines" on Pioneer x30 model tv's, is that still a common problem and was there a resolution?
Parts are only legally required to be kept available from the manufacturer for electronics for 7 years. That said, many sets that had some one thing wrong with them that brought them down are being parted out on the parts that were not part of the problem. CRTs can always be found at Video Display Corp, where Mit sold 20,000 at a pop to them a few years ago.

Quote:
Also, since I'm not tv tech knowledgable, what questions should I ask the seller? He's asking $200, says it's in excellent condition, but my concern is he's indicated that it's been stored in his garage for a timeframe I've yet to ascertain. He says it'll need recalibration, and recommends cleaning the tubes.
Smart owner. Good advice. The longer it has been in cold storage the shorter the aging on the CRTs and thus the longer the set will go on producing extravagantly good HD.

$200 is extremely reasonable for a fully operational 64" big screen even if it needs some work. That set in its earlier 710 incarnation went for $7000 typically, and some sold for as much as $12000.

The streaking thing on the x30 series - like your 730 - that kept happening to them was covered by warranty and for a few years later too, after Pioneer was ordered to, in the class action lawsuit that Pioneer lost. If that streaking never happened on the set in question, chances are it won't be happening now. But you should definitely ask the owner if he had that streaking fixed, either under warranty or out of his pocket.

Also ask if the set has been used as the family baby sitter, on 12-16 hours a day, or as a videophile set, on maybe a few hours a day or maybe just a few times a week.

Ask if the Contrast has ever been set higher than the default centerpoint of zero, halfway between -30 and +30. If so then it may have been pre-aged on its CRT lifespans.

Quote:
For background reference, I've only had CRT tv's and have always been disappointed in the picture quality of my friends flat-screens (not sure if led or plasmas, but surely not professionally calibrated). I'm now in need of a larger display so am days away from purchasing one of the last Samsung 1080p plasma tv's, but am concerned about its probable short lifespan and perhaps incomparable picture quality to that of a used CRT tv. Also, I'm wishing to transition from my current 4:3 set to 16:9. Is there perhaps a different RPTV, or just a standard CRT I should be on the lookout for instead? Many thanks for any shared thoughts.
I share your devotion to CRT, we here all do. Welcome! I am honored that here was your very first post!

All HDready TVs past a certain point were 16x9 after that. The 4x3 HDs were only for a short time during the transition to HD and were then phased out.

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post #12696 of 12715 Old 10-16-2014, 06:26 AM
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If i was you Tubetop i would GRAB THAT 730 you will not be Sorry. I have a 710 series Elite & Love it. I had to have the power supply resoldered a year ago because Pioneer did a poor job on soldering the power supply on the 710 & half of the 720 series boards the 730 Do Not have this Issue. Give it a good cleaning inside & out ( Bob can help you with that) if you do not know how. Good Luck & hope you enjoy it
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post #12697 of 12715 Old 10-16-2014, 11:20 AM - Thread Starter
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I can also help with anybody who needs their power supply board resoldered. I am the only one in the world supplying a lifetime warranty on that resoldering when done on the Pioneer HDready CRT RPTVs, which have been coming up with breakdowns on their PS boards since 2004. After my protocol, that is a thing of the past and your set is stable again.

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post #12698 of 12715 Old 10-18-2014, 03:32 PM
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Sorry if this is the wrong place to post this.


I just purchased a house and they left a Pioneer Elite Pro-730HD in perfect working condition in the finished basement.


The TV came with two remotes, operating Instructions and the matching cabinet for the AV equipment.


I also have the original receipt.


Does this TV still have value, If so where can I sell it? My wife thinks it's too big and hates the shinny black finish.


Thanks!


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post #12699 of 12715 Old 10-18-2014, 04:38 PM - Thread Starter
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Too bad. That "shiny black finish" - otherwise known as "gold trim piano black lacquer finish" is nowhere to be found these days, and would be hella expensive if you could find it. It was the primary difference between their Elite line of HDreadys and their regular HDready stuff, for which the electronics inside was virtually identical. It is the signature design look of all the Pioneer Elite components, audio and video, from way back when to today, and has been for decades. Furniture has been designed around it, some of which you have. It is classy, classic and a highly respected sign of superb quality in audio/videophile circles.

And too big??? Once you have immersive, engrossing size in your display that makes you forget you're actually in a viewing room, you never again want to go back again to small. And 64" is not the biggest size in displays, not by a long shot. What size is your wife used to?


Unfortunately none of that makes your set any more valuable on resale.

The resale value of these sets has been dashed due to the fanatical backlash market response to flat panel, seeing as how when these CRT sets were in their prime, flat panel prices were thru the roof. Only the wealthy could afford them. Now that anyone can get one for a reasonable price, these masterful CRT sets are now looked upon as big and clunky, and therefor reselling them has no profit motive anymore. Esp. with the wives. Their size has not changed, there is simply something out there on the market that's thinner, and CRT's size is needed to fit the folded reflection design that preserves the quality they possess. In my book size means nothing compared to the value of the precision, crispness, depth, dynamic range and lifelike fleshtones that can be brought out of a CRT set. The suspension of disbelief is truly hypnotic.

All digital sets OTOH, still struggle with things our CRT sets have never had to worry about. See the very first post of this thread - 423 pages ago, in 2006 - for details on that.

And no, if you still want to sell it you'll have to do so elsewhere, like Craig's List or ebay, or in the For Sale section here on the AVS. In this thread descriptions of what you have are always welcome, but all you can do is give those sets away, you can't sell them here on this thread.

The real value of these sets is in the use of them. Or as gifts to the younger set who cannot afford much of today's equipment. Even today these sets - and yours too - can be made to look better then when they came out of the box. Far better, actually.

Properly cleaned and fully dialed in they are a wonder to behold, they stand tall with everything else out there today and soundly trounce many of the less expensive displays. They can be dialed in so tightly that you can study the grain of the film they used to shoot that movie you are watching. And nothing short of OLED has better blacks and resultant transparency and depth. Not DLP, not plasma, not LED-lit or flourescent-lit LCD, not D-ILA, not LCOS, not Hughes light valve...

Fly me in. I'll show you.



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post #12700 of 12715 Old 10-18-2014, 07:53 PM
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Yes. Only OLED beats CRT's blacks.

My Mitsubishi 65813 has piano black finish, too.
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post #12701 of 12715 Old 10-18-2014, 09:06 PM - Thread Starter
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I'm jealous. Mine's gray and it's not glossy. But it's a 73! I can live with that.



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Well, we must both make do with what we have.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tubetop View Post
Forgive me if these questions have already been answered, a quick search hasn't revealed much and time is of the essence.

Are parts still available for RPTV's? How much should I expect to regularly spend to keep a RPTV functioning? I ask because I just came across a Pioneer Elite Pro-730HD, and Pioneer doesn't have replacement tubes anymore, along with the many other parts they show are unavailable. I found a class action legal settlement regarding "colored lines" on Pioneer x30 model tv's, is that still a common problem and was there a resolution?

Also, since I'm not tv tech knowledgable, what questions should I ask the seller? He's asking $200, says it's in excellent condition, but my concern is he's indicated that it's been stored in his garage for a timeframe I've yet to ascertain. He says it'll need recalibration, and recommends cleaning the tubes.

For background reference, I've only had CRT tv's and have always been disappointed in the picture quality of my friends flat-screens (not sure if led or plasmas, but surely not professionally calibrated). I'm now in need of a larger display so am days away from purchasing one of the last Samsung 1080p plasma tv's, but am concerned about its probable short lifespan and perhaps incomparable picture quality to that of a used CRT tv.

Also, I'm wishing to transition from my current 4:3 set to 16:9. Is there perhaps a different RPTV, or just a standard CRT I should be on the lookout for instead? Many thanks for any shared thoughts.

I have a Pioneer 620 58" and after adding a cheap DVDO VP30 to reduce overscan (eBay 125.00). And proper calibration and with Mr. Bobs on the phone deep optics cleaning assistance my 13 year old Pioneer has a picture as nice as my plasma and LED TV but without the issue of pixcellation like current flat screens have. Also Infinate black level and a beautiful piano black outside big enough to hold my very large center channel speaker.
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post #12704 of 12715 Old 10-18-2014, 10:59 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by taichi4 View Post
Well, we must both make do with what we have.
Well, we both have the big guns, anyway!



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post #12705 of 12715 Old 10-19-2014, 06:08 PM
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Parts are only legally required to be kept available from the manufacturer for electronics for 7 years. That said, many sets that had some one thing wrong with them that brought them down are being parted out on the parts that were not part of the problem. CRTs can always be found at Video Display Corp, where Mit sold 20,000 at a pop to them a few years ago.

Smart owner. Good advice. The longer it has been in cold storage the shorter the aging on the CRTs and thus the longer the set will go on producing extravagantly good HD.

$200 is extremely reasonable for a fully operational 64" big screen even if it needs some work. That set in its earlier 710 incarnation went for $7000 typically, and some sold for as much as $12000.

The streaking thing on the x30 series - like your 730 - that kept happening to them was covered by warranty and for a few years later too, after Pioneer was ordered to, in the class action lawsuit that Pioneer lost. If that streaking never happened on the set in question, chances are it won't be happening now. But you should definitely ask the owner if he had that streaking fixed, either under warranty or out of his pocket.

Also ask if the set has been used as the family baby sitter, on 12-16 hours a day, or as a videophile set, on maybe a few hours a day or maybe just a few times a week.

Ask if the Contrast has ever been set higher than the default centerpoint of zero, halfway between -30 and +30. If so then it may have been pre-aged on its CRT lifespans.

I share your devotion to CRT, we here all do. Welcome! I am honored that here was your very first post!

All HDready TVs past a certain point were 16x9 after that. The 4x3 HDs were only for a short time during the transition to HD and were then phased out.

b
Thanks, Mr. Bob (and others) for your guidance. After a few emails I have more info to share.

I've learned the seller is the original owner, and it was the main TV for 3 years. For the last 2 years it has been stored in an insulated (not climate controlled) garage. Our summers are 100F and winters 15F, should I be concerned about electrical connections?

It was watched only a few hours a night. The owner said he replaces his TV's every few years as he's a fan of audio and video. For reference, this CRT RPTV was replaced by a plasma, and now he has a Sony 4K.

Regarding the streaking, he's never had any issues with the TV, and was never notified by Pioneer about any defects. He had it calibrated by the Geek Squad once, but doesn't know what the contrast was set to. A few months ago (for a garage sale) he "hooked a bluray player to it and was amazed at how good the picture, sound, everything still worked".

He said he's only selling it so cheap because he hasn't used it in a few years, and it's just taking up garage space. How much are people usually selling this model for?

Again, thanks to all for your guidance. I'm trying to arrange a time to see it, and told the seller I'll likely buy it. Now my dilemma is transporting this behemoth. I plan to rent a small trailer. Any moving suggestions?

Lastly, though probably should have been my first question. Pioneer suggests a viewing distance of 10 - 23 feet. My viewing distance is limited to a maximum of 8 feet, will this be too close to enjoy or cause eyestrain?

Also, I watch over-the-air broadcast using an HD converter. As I understand it the converter reads the HD broadcast signal and then converts it to SD (standard definition) regardless of watching on an HD TV. Will an SD broadcast on a 64" screen with an 8 feet viewing distance be horrid?

PS: Mr. Bob, thanks for welcoming me to the forum. I was both pleased and honored to have you answer my first post. My dearly departed grandfather owned and operated a radio repair shop, which later became a TV repair shop as the market shifted. Needless to say, he had the first TV in his neighborhood. I wish I shared in his knowledge, as you know it's a joy being able to fix things. I absolutely abhor disposable electronics.
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post #12706 of 12715 Old Yesterday, 12:16 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tubetop View Post
Thanks, Mr. Bob (and others) for your guidance. After a few emails I have more info to share.

I've learned the seller is the original owner, and it was the main TV for 3 years. For the last 2 years it has been stored in an insulated (not climate controlled) garage. Our summers are 100F and winters 15F, should I be concerned about electrical connections?
Not a worry. Cold solder joints are caused by repeated and abrupt heat/cold fluctuations, like when turning the set on and off over and over again for years. That won't happen in a garage, where the weather will shift very slowly and whatever temp fluctuations happen, they won't start on the inside of the set. This series did not have any cold solder joint issues like the x10 series did on their PS boards.

Quote:
It was watched only a few hours a night. The owner said he replaces his TV's every few years as he's a fan of audio and video. For reference, this CRT RPTV was replaced by a plasma, and now he has a Sony 4K.

Regarding the streaking, he's never had any issues with the TV, and was never notified by Pioneer about any defects. He had it calibrated by the Geek Squad once, but doesn't know what the contrast was set to. A few months ago (for a garage sale) he "hooked a bluray player to it and was amazed at how good the picture, sound, everything still worked".

He said he's only selling it so cheap because he hasn't used it in a few years, and it's just taking up garage space. How much are people usually selling this model for?
I am not up on that. You'd have to check ebay or CrL. But $200 is a drop in the bucket compared to the $7000 it probably originally cost him. It's still a steal. I'd hop on it right now if I were you, before somebody else is willing to spring that for an awesomely big 64" that is fully operational. That person could be headed over there right now.

Quote:
Again, thanks to all for your guidance. I'm trying to arrange a time to see it, and told the seller I'll likely buy it. Now my dilemma is transporting this behemoth. I plan to rent a small trailer. Any moving suggestions?
Put it on top of half a dozen UNbuilt Uhaul boxes. That will be 12 layers of triple-corrugated cardboard, to protect it from road shock. Take a screen-filling all white or all gray pattern with you to check for screenburn from channel logos or extensive 4x3 content use with black bars. Or t/b black bar screenburn from too many 2.35:1 cinemascope movies.

Quote:
Lastly, though probably should have been my first question. Pioneer suggests a viewing distance of 10 - 23 feet. My viewing distance is limited to a maximum of 8 feet, will this be too close to enjoy or cause eyestrain?
After one of my calibrations 8' becomes the new standard viewing distance for a 64"-65" screen, same as with DLP. Sitting 10-23' away is wasting the awesome size you can get out of her by sitting a huge amount closer. If you're going to sit that far away, why not just get a 26" DVTV and sit 8' away? It would be about the same.

Quote:
Also, I watch over-the-air broadcast using an HD converter. As I understand it the converter reads the HD broadcast signal and then converts it to SD (standard definition) regardless of watching on an HD TV. Will an SD broadcast on a 64" screen with an 8 feet viewing distance be horrid?
A true HD tuner is not a converter. It preserves the full 1080i and does not convert it to SD. You are using that little box the government bought for you so your old SD set would play new HD content. But it plays it IN SD! It downconverts it, making the fact that this is a superb TV for HD irrelevant. You're downconverting your HD content to SD and feeding that to your set! Although your set has a terrific upconverter for turning 480i into 480p, that's not even close to what your set is capable of at 1080i, which has 6x the resolution of 480i.

Get a true HD tuner. Samsung makes a great one, you can probably find one used for $150 on ebay or Craigs List.

Quote:
PS: Mr. Bob, thanks for welcoming me to the forum. I was both pleased and honored to have you answer my first post. My dearly departed grandfather owned and operated a radio repair shop, which later became a TV repair shop as the market shifted. Needless to say, he had the first TV in his neighborhood. I wish I shared in his knowledge, as you know it's a joy being able to fix things. I absolutely abhor disposable electronics.
We definitely have that in common! Glad to have you here.



b

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post #12707 of 12715 Old Yesterday, 03:51 PM
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Not a worry. Cold solder joints are caused by repeated and abrupt heat/cold fluctuations, like when turning the set on and off over and over again for years. That won't happen in a garage, where the weather will shift very slowly and whatever temp fluctuations happen, they won't start on the inside of the set. This series did not have any cold solder joint issues like the x10 series did on their PS boards.

I am not up on that. You'd have to check ebay or CrL. But $200 is a drop in the bucket compared to the $7000 it probably originally cost him. It's still a steal. I'd hop on it right now if I were you, before somebody else is willing to spring that for an awesomely big 64" that is fully operational. That person could be headed over there right now.

Put it on top of half a dozen UNbuilt Uhaul boxes. That will be 12 layers of triple-corrugated cardboard, to protect it from road shock. Take a screen-filling all white or all gray pattern with you to check for screenburn from channel logos or extensive 4x3 content use with black bars. Or t/b black bar screenburn from too many 2.35:1 cinemascope movies.

After one of my calibrations 8' becomes the new standard viewing distance for a 64"-65" screen, same as with DLP. Sitting 10-23' away is wasting the awesome size you can get out of her by sitting a huge amount closer. If you're going to sit that far away, why not just get a 26" DVTV and sit 8' away? It would be about the same.

A true HD tuner is not a converter. It preserves the full 1080i and does not convert it to SD. You are using that little box the government bought for you so your old SD set would play new HD content. But it plays it IN SD! It downconverts it, making the fact that this is a superb TV for HD irrelevant. You're downconverting your HD content to SD and feeding that to your set! Although your set has a terrific upconverter for turning 480i into 480p, that's not even close to what your set is capable of at 1080i, which has 6x the resolution of 480i.

Get a true HD tuner. Samsung makes a great one, you can probably find one used for $150 on ebay or Craigs List.

We definitely have that in common! Glad to have you here.



b
Sorry I'm not addressing each point individually. For whatever reason I'm unable to break up the quotes.

Re: screen pattern test
I don't know how to do this. Will you point me in a good direction to read about it?

Re: viewing distance
It occurred to me that watching from 10-23 feet away is like looking at a scenic view through a picture window, then stepping back so it'll look better. Apparently the only reason to sit further back is to hide bad picture quality. Since THX suggests 6.5 feet for a 65" screen, then 8 feet should be good, especially with an HD tuner and professional calibration (planning for your phone consult).

Though I'm making arrangements to buy the 730HD, this morning I found a PRO-730HDI selling for $500. Curiously, is the HDI a better set? I found a reference that the HDI calibration is easier and more thorough.

Also, the review stated "the one has physical difference between the PRO-730HD and the PRO-730HDi is the latter's upgraded digital inputs, which use the new, smaller High Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) connections. With the appropriate adapter cable, these can theoretically accept a DVI (video only) feed. No such cable was available to me before deadline; I performed all of my DVI testing with the PRO-730HD's conventional DVI input."

Are the 730HDI differences significant enough to warrant consideration if I could haggle down the price?

Thanks again for your continued input.
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post #12708 of 12715 Old Yesterday, 04:44 PM
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Bob is the expert, and he will opine on the DVI/HDMI of the newer set. I would venture to say the newer set is better...but that also depends on the condition of the set. The older one seems fairly pristine.

Regarding what you call the test pattern, all you need to do is download a pure white screen or field, and copy it to a DVD. There are sites available for this. The point is, that with a fully white screen displayed, you will quickly see any patterns, logs, etc. that have burned into the face of the cathodes.

Regarding distance, eight feet is fine. I have a 65 inch set, and I have not yet had Bob's magic, which will undoubtedly improve the picture, and I would not sit any further away.
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Bob is the expert, and he will opine on the DVI/HDMI of the newer set. I would venture to say the newer set is better...but that also depends on the condition of the set. The older one seems fairly pristine.

Regarding what you call the test pattern, all you need to do is download a pure white screen or field, and copy it to a DVD. There are sites available for this. The point is, that with a fully white screen displayed, you will quickly see any patterns, logs, etc. that have burned into the face of the cathodes.

Regarding distance, eight feet is fine. I have a 65 inch set, and I have not yet had Bob's magic, which will undoubtedly improve the picture, and I would not sit any further away.
Thanks, taich4, that testing info helped a lot, and fortunately isn't confusingly technical.

Well the HD is $200, the HDI is $500; not a hard choice to make unless the HDI seller is willing to come down a bit. Though while the HD sounds like it's in excellent condition, it can't hurt to ask about the HDI condition and if the seller will lower the price. I'll report back.

Good to hear viewing distance won't be an issue. One of the viewers will be a senior who is developing cataracts and has decreasing visual acuity so that is mostly my impetus for wanting a larger (and brighter) screen.
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What you want to find and download is a 100% Color Test, which is a white screen.

I have an MP4 file of the test, but the AVS Forum protocol won't let me post an MP4.

By the way, here's a review of the 730HD wherein the reviewer, commenting, as well, on the 730HDi, is not impressed by the latter's HDMI/DVI input. Bob has often said that the early iterations of the digital interface on many of these RPTVs are not that great.

So maybe the $200 deal is the way to go.

http://www.soundandvision.com/conten...jection-crt-tv

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What you want to find and download is a 100% Color Test, which is a white screen.

I have an MP4 file of the test, but the AVS Forum protocol won't let me post an MP4.

By the way, here's a review of the 730HD wherein the reviewer, commenting, as well, on the 730HDi, is not impressed by the latter's HDMI/DVI input. Bob has often said that the early iterations of the digital interface on many of these RPTVs are not that great.

So maybe the $200 deal is the way to go.
Yeah, between the price and condition, the 730HD seems to be the winner. I emailed the seller of the HDi, so we shall see.

I tried to PM my email address to ask that you email the MP4, but my post count hasn't reached 15 yet. If you wouldn't mind PM'ing your email address so I can send you mine. If not, that's okay.

That review is where I got the info about the 730HDi, but like most of this stuff, it's Greek to me.

Me being a tech-dunce, it's a testament to this forum that my questions have been answered both patiently and kindly, rather than with contempt and sarcasm. Thanks, guys.
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Yeah, between the price and condition, the 730HD seems to be the winner. I emailed the seller of the HDi, so we shall see.
730HDi seller responded:

Original owner, bought in 2004, selling due to moving, no Pioneer lawsuit streaking issues, no repairs or maintenance ever performed, never professionally calibrated, unknown contrast settings / history, no ghosting or burn-in, watched 6 - 8 hours per week, will accept $250.

730HD: approx. 4,360 hours plus ?
(main TV for 3 years at 4 hours per day, several years as secondary TV, in storage for 2 years)

730HDi: approx. 4,160 hours
(main TV for 10 years at 8 hours per week)

I question the 6 - 8 hours per week. Who buys such an expensive TV to watch so little TV?

Hopefully Mr. Bob will give his opinion.

Edit: Both of these sets are located in different cities in opposite directions, so I can't just pop-over to check them both out.

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post #12713 of 12715 Old Today, 09:12 AM - Thread Starter
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If there's only $50 worth of difference between the 2, may as well go for the HDi equipped one. If contrast cannot be pinned down, it was probably left at factory default of 0/midpoint between -30 and +30, which is ideal. On Pioneer Elites you really have to consciously turn it up to push the light levels. Not so much on the non-Elite Pioneers and the Mit's.

If the 730HD has no DVI circuit, you can use component and get the exact same great picture. If it contains a DVI input and not HDMI, just buy a passive DVI to HDMI converter for $30 or less - less at Monoprice - and it should accept HDMI's video. No need for HDMI's audio if your audio goes thru an AVR anyway. I believe you'll find that the i means it had HDMI, and the non-I means it only had DVI. But check that out to be sure.

The challenge will be finding a bluray player that puts out 1080i on its component outs, if it has any to begin with. They have been completely phased out on all but maybe the Oppo BDPs. The final generation, where they built BDPs with component out that limited you to 480p, will do you no good because they won't pass 1080i in that series out of their component OPs.

I have one of the last ones made that does pass that 1080i thru to component for use in a set not equipped with either DVI or HDMI, and will make it available upon demand. I actually have 2, both 3D equipped Sonys, but am not parting with the other one!



I also have the Fury's to call upon if you need your HDMI converted to component for sets without HDMI/DVI and you have no BDP with 1080i capable component OPs.

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post #12714 of 12715 Old Today, 09:26 AM - Thread Starter
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To do quotes, put a [, then quote, then ] on the front of it, and [, then /quote, then ] on the end of it.

b

Robert Jones
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If there's only $50 worth of difference between the 2, may as well go for the HDi equipped one.
My earlier skepticism of the 730HDi condition has increased significantly. The sellers ad is titled "64 inch Pioneer Projection Screen TV" and the description is "Large Screen TV - Good HD Picture" and the price. That's it.

Whereas, the 730HD seller took the effort to at least post the original ad copy and pic, and include a short biography about his TV. He also answered from his work email with his full name and business title which reveals him to be a professional in an upscale community.

As opposed to this follow-up email from the 730HDi seller, "FYI – I have two cinder blocks wrapped in Black duct tape that the TV sits on.  This elevates the TV approximately 7 inches for a better viewing height especially from a recliner.  These are both included as well."

So rather than driving to see the HDi, then getting the HD instead, which would be nearly a 7 hour 430 miles road trip. I'm going with the assumption that the 730HD is probably in better condition.

Thanks for helping in making this decision. I'll provide an update after purchase.
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