Sony 34XBR960 Anti-Glare Coating Removal - Page 4 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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Old 12-06-2015, 05:36 PM
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Honestly, I don't even know if my 960 has the anti-glare sheet of film or the anti-glare chemical coating. If it is a chemical coating, then it's pointless for me to remove the front black bezel because there's nothing to pull off. I might as well resort to Steel Wool #0000 or some other caustic material to dissolve the anti-glare layer if thats the case.

Does anyone know if the 960 has a sheet of film or a sprayed on coating? Mine was manufactured in July of 2005 in Westmoreland, PA.
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Old 12-11-2015, 07:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeneraLight View Post
Honestly, I don't even know if my 960 has the anti-glare sheet of film or the anti-glare chemical coating. If it is a chemical coating, then it's pointless for me to remove the front black bezel because there's nothing to pull off. I might as well resort to Steel Wool #0000 or some other caustic material to dissolve the anti-glare layer if thats the case.

Does anyone know if the 960 has a sheet of film or a sprayed on coating? Mine was manufactured in July of 2005 in Westmoreland, PA.
So far as I am aware, the anti-glare on all of these CRTs is a film, not a "coating," that would have been sprayed on. Steel wool is exactly what people have used to remove it safely even in instances like this, maybe getting it started with an xacto knife. If you want to try pulling it off instead I recommend you try to source the service manual and inspect its diagrams carefully for the slots, tabs, bolts and other attachments that go to the front bezel. It isn't rocket science and several people have even done it without manuals or personal walkthroughs. Just look carefully as you go and you should be able to manage it without damaging anything. From your pictures I would expect that the bolts you pictured need to be removed, but also be on the lookout for tabs and slots to pry up, down, left or right.
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Old 12-11-2015, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by LiquidSnake View Post
So far as I am aware, the anti-glare on all of these CRTs is a film, not a "coating," that would have been sprayed on. Steel wool is exactly what people have used to remove it safely even in instances like this, maybe getting it started with an xacto knife. If you want to try pulling it off instead I recommend you try to source the service manual and inspect its diagrams carefully for the slots, tabs, bolts and other attachments that go to the front bezel. It isn't rocket science and several people have even done it without manuals or personal walkthroughs. Just look carefully as you go and you should be able to manage it without damaging anything. From your pictures I would expect that the bolts you pictured need to be removed, but also be on the lookout for tabs and slots to pry up, down, left or right.
That's what I think too with all of the accounts on here from other 960 owners saying they had a film. I just don't want to scratch the glass or black bezel with the steel wool. I also want to get rid of the entire film around the glass. Not just what shows up on the screen.

The green arrows here show the approximate locations of all the golden screws around the perimeter of the casing. I removed all of the golden screws where the green arrows are, but still couldn't get the front off. There are two tabs on the left and right side of the TV which you can push. When I pushed them both, the black bezel looked like it was slightly coming off, but no farther than that. The red crosses I did not remove yet. I'm not sure those gold screws with the washers behind them affect the black bezel removal, so I left them. I think they hold that weird thing that shows in front of the picture up.





The red cross here is what I've heard you're NOT supposed to remove. There are 4 of those large silver screws around each edge of the TV that hold it with the cabinet. Also, I don't think removing those would help in removing the black bezel. Its impossible to turn them anyway with a Phillips Screwdriver. They won't budge, and probably for good reason.

I'm not sure if removing all 4 of the orange ? screws would help in removing the black bezel in any way.

The green "cabinet screw" just shows one of the screw holes that connects the back casing of the TV onto the backside of the TV. That's step one, which was easy and had absolutely no trouble with. Step two is removing all of the gold screws around the perimeter of the TV inside, which I did. But I still couldn't get the black bezel off. I felt like I would break the plastic if I pulled too hard.

Any help here?

Last edited by GeneraLight; 12-11-2015 at 12:50 PM.
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Old 12-12-2015, 08:49 AM
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"I also want to get rid of the entire film around the glass. Not just what shows up on the screen."

Why?

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Old 12-12-2015, 11:24 AM
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"I also want to get rid of the entire film around the glass. Not just what shows up on the screen."

Why?
OCD thing. I know, its stupid. I just can't live knowing there's still anti-glare film around the TV.
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Old 12-12-2015, 11:50 AM
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OCD thing. I know, its stupid. I just can't live knowing there's still anti-glare film around the TV.
The ironic part is once you are successful, that old TV will bite the dust. But... at least you did it!
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Old 12-12-2015, 01:09 PM
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The ironic part is once you are successful, that old TV will bite the dust. But... at least you did it!
I don't understand what you're saying.
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Old 12-13-2015, 10:05 AM
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He's saying it's a lot of work for an old TV that is nearing the end of its 'design' life. Dangerous too, plus you may FUBAR the TV doing it.

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Old 12-13-2015, 10:41 AM
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Smile



I got the sheet off! It was actually pretty easy to peel off, and it came off in one piece. (although I cut part of it off with scissors). It's basically just a giant thick sheet of plastic. I'm surprised at how cloudy and murky the anti-glare film is. Surprisingly, the screen doesn't look that much more reflective, although the reflection is much clearer now. Also the scratches on it from the chemical cleaners which caused the numerous distracting rainbow scratches are on that AG film.

There are streaks on the glass that look like imprints from peeling the sheet off. Is that glue residue? I don't feel any glue. What's a good cleaner to remove the streaks and glue without damaging the glass?

I've heard Goo Gone does the trick.

EDIT: I just discovered a small cut on my left pinkie which is now bleeding a bit. Worth it easily though.
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Last edited by GeneraLight; 12-13-2015 at 11:24 AM.
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Old 12-13-2015, 11:42 AM
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Hopefully you got the stuff under the bezel too.
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Old 12-13-2015, 06:38 PM
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After I screwed everything back in and put the back cabinet on, I connected my Wii with the official Wii component cables and set the system output to 480p. The TV Screen looks absolutely amazing! Much brighter, the entire screen is crystal clear with no scratches or rainbow spots from the damaged AG film. The glass is basically brand new!

The clarity and black levels are unbelievable now. I 100% highly recommend the removal of the anti-glare film to all XBR960 owners, even if its in perfect condition. Peeling it off is the easiest and definitive way of removing it! Don't waste hours of scrubbing, getting debris everywhere and paying for steel wool. Just unscrew all the screws and you'll be able to peel the entire film off in about 10 minutes.
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Old 12-15-2015, 09:39 AM
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Congrats! You could try the Pine-Sol solution for glue residue removal, although I suspect you're well past that step by now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeneraLight View Post
Peeling it off is the easiest and definitive way of removing it! Don't waste hours of scrubbing, getting debris everywhere and paying for steel wool. Just unscrew all the screws and you'll be able to peel the entire film off in about 10 minutes.
Note for others: It can still be peeled off without dis-assembly by trimming it at the bezel edge.

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Old 12-15-2015, 08:21 PM
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After I screwed everything back in and put the back cabinet on, I connected my Wii with the official Wii component cables and set the system output to 480p. The TV Screen looks absolutely amazing! Much brighter, the entire screen is crystal clear with no scratches or rainbow spots from the damaged AG film. The glass is basically brand new!

The clarity and black levels are unbelievable now. I 100% highly recommend the removal of the anti-glare film to all XBR960 owners, even if its in perfect condition. Peeling it off is the easiest and definitive way of removing it! Don't waste hours of scrubbing, getting debris everywhere and paying for steel wool. Just unscrew all the screws and you'll be able to peel the entire film off in about 10 minutes.
Congrats, just curious to how you got started? Your above post asked for suggestions about the bezel. Did you end up getting the bezel off?
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Old 12-16-2015, 03:17 PM
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Congrats, just curious to how you got started? Your above post asked for suggestions about the bezel. Did you end up getting the bezel off?
Thank you.

The first time I removed the back cabinet and took out the golden screws inside, I couldn't get the black bezel off. The reason for that was because there were two hidden golden screws at the top that I missed, and two black tabs on the sides of the TV that I didn't push outward. Well, it turns out that you had to remove those 4 gold screws with the washers behind them at the top because there is a golden screw hidden behind each pair that could only be accessed by removing the pairs. I didn't get the black bezel completely off because it was still screwed in at the bottom. The reason for that is because two of the bottom center screws are really hard to reach due to being buried in front of a lot of TV tech, circuitry, etc. But its not necessary to remove those.


Step 0: Turn the TV off, remove the power outlet and let it sit a few days unconnected before moving on to Step 1. This is for safety reasons. There is still voltage inside the TV even after it has been turned off. Let the TV sit unconnected for a couple days to allow the voltage to die down to avoid electric shock. This is just what I heard. It may not be necessary, but better safe than sorry.

Step 1: Remove all of the silver screws on the outside holding the back cabinet to the TV.

NOTE: Be careful and double check that ALL of the silver screws holding the back cabinet on are off before removing the cabinet so you don't break accidentally break or damage it trying to take it off.

Step 2: Remove the back cabinet.

Step 3: Remove all of the golden screws around the perimeter of inside the TV (except the speakers and anything not near the perimeter), including the 4 golden screws at the top with the washers behind them, because there is an additional golden screw behind each pair.

Step 4: On each side of the TV, there are two sets of tabs. Push all 4 four of those tabs outward, and the black bezel should pop off. It won't come off completely though because its still screwed in at the bottom.

Step 5: Pull the top of the black bezel out and you should see the entire TV screen behind it. There is an edge at the top corner of the screen that has a shine to it. That is the edge of the anti-glare film.

Step 6: Carefully pull at the edge of the anti-glare film and begin peeling. I'm not sure how fast or slow you should peel it, but I don't think it matters. I started out slow then sped up at the end. This process will probably take around 10 minutes due to sticking very well to the glass and maneuvering the sheet of AG film around the bezel.

NOTE: I ended up cutting my pinkie on the sheet of film. It was a small cut though. The sheet isn't sharp though

Step 7: After getting the anti-glare sheet of film off, toss it to the side or throw it away.

Step 8: Pop the black bezel back in, screw all of the golden screws back in tightly, put the back cabinet back on and then screw all of the silver screws back on.

Step 9: Wash the glass with a damp cloth to get rid of any glue adhesives. Use a cleaning solution without ammonia so you don't damage the plastic around the TV.

Step 10: There you go! A brand new glass screen with no scratches, increased brightness, better colors and more clarity!
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Last edited by GeneraLight; 12-16-2015 at 03:30 PM.
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Old 12-17-2015, 07:41 PM
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Originally Posted by GeneraLight View Post
Thank you.

The first time I removed the back cabinet and took out the golden screws inside, I couldn't get the black bezel off. The reason for that was because there were two hidden golden screws at the top that I missed, and two black tabs on the sides of the TV that I didn't push outward. Well, it turns out that you had to remove those 4 gold screws with the washers behind them at the top because there is a golden screw hidden behind each pair that could only be accessed by removing the pairs. I didn't get the black bezel completely off because it was still screwed in at the bottom. The reason for that is because two of the bottom center screws are really hard to reach due to being buried in front of a lot of TV tech, circuitry, etc. But its not necessary to remove those.


Step 0: Turn the TV off, remove the power outlet and let it sit a few days unconnected before moving on to Step 1. This is for safety reasons. There is still voltage inside the TV even after it has been turned off. Let the TV sit unconnected for a couple days to allow the voltage to die down to avoid electric shock. This is just what I heard. It may not be necessary, but better safe than sorry.

Step 1: Remove all of the silver screws on the outside holding the back cabinet to the TV.

NOTE: Be careful and double check that ALL of the silver screws holding the back cabinet on are off before removing the cabinet so you don't break accidentally break or damage it trying to take it off.

Step 2: Remove the back cabinet.

Step 3: Remove all of the golden screws around the perimeter of inside the TV (except the speakers and anything not near the perimeter), including the 4 golden screws at the top with the washers behind them, because there is an additional golden screw behind each pair.

Step 4: On each side of the TV, there are two sets of tabs. Push all 4 four of those tabs outward, and the black bezel should pop off. It won't come off completely though because its still screwed in at the bottom.

Step 5: Pull the top of the black bezel out and you should see the entire TV screen behind it. There is an edge at the top corner of the screen that has a shine to it. That is the edge of the anti-glare film.

Step 6: Carefully pull at the edge of the anti-glare film and begin peeling. I'm not sure how fast or slow you should peel it, but I don't think it matters. I started out slow then sped up at the end. This process will probably take around 10 minutes due to sticking very well to the glass and maneuvering the sheet of AG film around the bezel.

NOTE: I ended up cutting my pinkie on the sheet of film. It was a small cut though. The sheet isn't sharp though

Step 7: After getting the anti-glare sheet of film off, toss it to the side or throw it away.

Step 8: Pop the black bezel back in, screw all of the golden screws back in tightly, put the back cabinet back on and then screw all of the silver screws back on.

Step 9: Wash the glass with a damp cloth to get rid of any glue adhesives. Use a cleaning solution without ammonia so you don't damage the plastic around the TV.

Step 10: There you go! A brand new glass screen with no scratches, increased brightness, better colors and more clarity!
Respect given!
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Old 12-18-2015, 08:59 AM
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Our XBR960N didn't come with any anti-glare coating but I'm assuming that's what the N denotes, if anything you shouldn't worry about removing it from a non-N model if Sony was willing to sell them without it installed.
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Old 12-18-2015, 11:30 AM
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Our XBR960N didn't come with any anti-glare coating but I'm assuming that's what the N denotes, if anything you shouldn't worry about removing it from a non-N model if Sony was willing to sell them without it installed.
Yep, from what I've heard Sony came out with the N models because many folks complained of lack of brightness, etc.
Non-N models have the film installed. N is for No film.

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Old 12-18-2015, 01:32 PM
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Yep, from what I've heard Sony came out with the N models because many folks complained of lack of brightness, etc.
Non-N models have the film installed. N is for No film.
Is that the only difference between the XBR960 and XBR960N? The 960N doesn't have any anti-glare covering?

You can increase the brightness by setting 'Picture' to Max in the User Menu. Much brighter picture with more vibrant colors, while still keeping the inky blacks. Don't increase the 'Brightness' setting above 31 though. That will cause the picture to get brighter, at the expense of black losing its darkness and colors becoming washed out.

Is there any other way of increasing the brightness? Like in the service menu?
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Old 12-18-2015, 02:04 PM
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Is that the only difference between the XBR960 and XBR960N? The 960N doesn't have any anti-glare covering?

You can increase the brightness by setting 'Picture' to Max in the User Menu. Much brighter picture with more vibrant colors, while still keeping the inky blacks. Don't increase the 'Brightness' setting above 31 though. That will cause the picture to get brighter, at the expense of black losing its darkness and colors becoming washed out.

Is there any other way of increasing the brightness? Like in the service menu?
Yeppers AFAIK:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FD_Trinitron/WEGA

Apparently it was a real issue for them to have two sub-models. I take it many didn't like the adjustment trade-off unless there were other issues involved. And keep in mind that not all of them will adjust the same. It also lessens a CRT's lifetime to run at high contrast (i.e. picture, contrast, etc.; brightness oddly enough refers to black level).

Probably, but again an overdrive/lifetime issue. I don't own one of these but have (or had) been interested in one. I have a Panasonic 2001 version of one of these widescreen HD CRTs.

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Old 12-18-2015, 03:30 PM
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Yeppers AFAIK:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FD_Trinitron/WEGA

Apparently it was a real issue for them to have two sub-models. I take it many didn't like the adjustment trade-off unless there were other issues involved. And keep in mind that not all of them will adjust the same. It also lessens a CRT's lifetime to run at high contrast (i.e. picture, contrast, etc.; brightness oddly enough refers to black level).

Probably, but again an overdrive/lifetime issue. I don't own one of these but have (or had) been interested in one. I have a Panasonic 2001 version of one of these widescreen HD CRTs.
So having Picture on Max decreases the lifespan? Why? Should I just set everything to minimum or the recommended level.
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Old 12-18-2015, 03:54 PM
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High contrast (white) decreases the lifespan. Brightness (black) is not as bad, but with all CRT's, should not be abused.
More "white"... the more it burns the CRT.
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Old 12-18-2015, 03:56 PM
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High contrast (white) decreases the lifespan. Brightness (black) is not as bad, but with all CRT's, should not be abused.
More "white"... the more it burns the CRT.


So how do I get optimal picture quality and the longest possible lifespan?
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Old 12-19-2015, 07:02 AM
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Don't keep "contrast" set at maximum.
Adjust settings using the Goldilocks method:
Not too high, not too low, but juuuust right.
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Old 12-19-2015, 07:55 AM
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So having Picture on Max decreases the lifespan? Why? Should I just set everything to minimum or the recommended level.
Burns the phosphors faster, high voltage transformer and other components run at higher [current] drive levels, heat, etc. Some CRTs you can hear 'em whine as you make the whites whiter.

Just adjust the white to the point where it's acceptable to you. I've read to adjust to where it doesn't get any brighter then stop, maybe backing off a touch, but some of these high-end CRTs (and PC monitors) can get so 'blasting' white before that happens that it's ridiculous; my Panny HD CRT does that.
On the brightness I adjust just until the blacks start to shift gray, then fine tune around that point. Men's black suits are a good visual to use, not so black you can't see the contours of the suit; but beware the harsh lighting of some shows like news, late night TV, etc.
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Old 12-19-2015, 07:56 AM
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So how do I get optimal picture quality and the longest possible lifespan?
Remove the anti-glare film.
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Old 12-19-2015, 05:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Floydage View Post
Yeppers AFAIK:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FD_Trinitron/WEGA

Apparently it was a real issue for them to have two sub-models. I take it many didn't like the adjustment trade-off unless there were other issues involved. And keep in mind that not all of them will adjust the same. It also lessens a CRT's lifetime to run at high contrast (i.e. picture, contrast, etc.; brightness oddly enough refers to black level).

Probably, but again an overdrive/lifetime issue. I don't own one of these but have (or had) been interested in one. I have a Panasonic 2001 version of one of these widescreen HD CRTs.
I noticed when increasing the Picture setting if you pay attention to text clarity while doing so (especially white text on black) you'll notice the text will start to bloom a little as it gets closer to the max setting, I set mine just below the point of blooming which is fairly close to max (this will vary by unit).
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Last edited by Mathesar; 12-19-2015 at 05:08 PM.
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Old 12-23-2015, 05:29 PM
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I noticed when increasing the Picture setting if you pay attention to text clarity while doing so (especially white text on black) you'll notice the text will start to bloom a little as it gets closer to the max setting, I set mine just below the point of blooming which is fairly close to max (this will vary by unit).
Is the "white bloom" considered a bad thing? I heard that most if not all CRTs suffered from white bloom. Then the KV-27FV310 came out, which had a high voltage regulator. The high voltage regulator stopped the white bloom issue.

Doesn't the 960 have the same high voltage regulator?
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