Need Advice CRT To HD, Best for Eye Strain Issues - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 07-01-2011, 04:14 AM - Thread Starter
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If this is the wrong forum, my apologies, please move to the proper forum. I have been stubbornly staying with CRT tv's using Directv. Here is my issue and where I need advice from the pro's here.

Eyestrain, whenever I have tried to change to LCD, I have had burning eyes. Eyes have been checked, have no issues, but I've always had a problem with certain screens. I once bought a Sony Vaio laptop, immediately noticed the eyestrain effect, even with the screen dimmed, switched to a Macbook Pro matte screen, can look at it for hours without a problem.

In the room that I use, a 27 inch direct view CRT is what works the best. I tried a new Samsung LED LCD 26LV2500. First off I realized that I need a 32 inch LCD screen to get the same effect of 27" crt tv. But in standard format, my eyes were fine with interview shows or even news programs, but once I changed to movies, especially motion orientated stuff, I got the burning eyes again. ( I was watching in the traditional 4:3 format since it was standard definition programming.)

I followed all of the advice on this forum in regard to screen settings.

Is watching in HD, will that make all the difference in the world when you are dealing with eyestrain? Or for people that have had this problem, is plasma the only answer? The Samsung had a 60 refresh rate, would a 120 refresh rate be the difference maker?

I'm old school, if I could watch a crt tube forever, I would, unfortunately no manufacturers make a 27 inch crt tv anymore. As I finally make the changes, get the new HD directv dish, what would you recommend to alleviate this eyestrain issue?

In addition, the problem with plasma is that for the size room, 40" and above is too big but if plasma offers the best viewing experience, I may not have a choice.

Thanks for your help.
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post #2 of 8 Old 07-03-2011, 07:32 PM
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Assuming it's only for Direct T.V. my advice would be to stick with cathode ray tubes if you love 'em. Sure they don't make them anymore but at one point, they did make high definition ones, so you can probably get one used or unopened if you hit up Ebay, Amazon or Craigslist.

Some of the Sony WEGAs were popular models that did 720p and/or 1080i. Unfortunately, most of the CRTs I know of were 4:3. However I do know of at least one proper CRT direct view16:9 model, the RCA F38310 38". (I'd give you a link but I don't have enough posts yet.) A.F.A.I.K. the F.C.C. doesn't allow televised D.R.M. content The lack of 1080p and D.R.M. is certainly frustrating if you ever plan to watch blurays but if you avoid movies marked ICT (stands for image constraint token, a way to force low res output) and pick out a component video cable capable Bluray player, I would imagine you should be relatively fine.

Not sure much about eyestrain unfortunately but I've heard CRTs don't have a native resolution, so you can probably keep on watching S.D. channels with the sucker just the same if worse comes to worse.
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post #3 of 8 Old 07-04-2011, 10:11 PM
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While I don't have problems with eye strain with flat panels, I will say that I tend to get headaches when watching LCD TVs. My HD CRT or any CRT for that matter doesn't give me a headache like most LCD sets do.
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post #4 of 8 Old 07-04-2011, 10:24 PM
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UH, u guys maybe just the pioneers for a new kind of ailment: LCD-nadis!

Does a standard definition, analog program on a LCD give u the same problem? If yes, then truly the LCD technology is the culprit. If negative, you maybe just stare "too hard" at the now very detailed image, and here maybe a retraining of your eye-watching habit is the way to go. But am no M.D. only my writing!

Solution: FREE. Explanation: I will have to charge$ you.

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post #5 of 8 Old 07-05-2011, 12:52 AM
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Most LCD computer monitors cannot do 8bit colour so they use dithering techniques to simulate 8bit colour from a 6bit panel. I don't know whether it is the same with LCD televisions but I wouldn't be surprised if cheaper LCD TVs are ditherers. Some people find that hard to look at.

An article I found says
Quote:
Vast majority of LCD TVs (and monitors) today are once again using TN panels, largely because of the pricing advantage.

TN panels are nearly always 6bit. There are different LCD panel technologies out there and the vast majority of LCDs don't contain high quality 8 or 10 bit IPS panels.

You've got a 768p panel LCD too. I find 768 panels relatively harsh to look at.

There are 30" widescreen superfine pitch HD CRTs with HDMI out there. Maybe you should look at the second hand market for a Sony KD-30XBR960?
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post #6 of 8 Old 07-05-2011, 11:00 AM
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Most LCDs also have terrible motion resolution as well as the color issues and so forth previously mentioned. I think it's a combination of all those factors. May also be the fact that they are so bright and being in other peoples homes they aren't calibrated like my set.
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post #7 of 8 Old 07-06-2011, 10:21 AM
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I have found excessive backlight brightness to be a problem with LCD sets. This is compounded by the fact that they use high white point lamps to get the screens brighter - this is demonstrated very well by my two laptops. My HP DV9000 has a yellowish tinted backlight which is tame and easy on the eyes, while my HP DV5 has a more bluish backlight which i find harsh in most situations. It also does not dim as much as i'd like when using it at night.

On a CRT you have full control of the white point and color temperature. On a LCD you can only control the color temperature of the panel, it's impossible to adjust the lamps in this aspect.

On the other hand, plasmas have gotten real cheap here. Next year (well, maybe as soon as this winter, depending on my budget) i'm buying a big plasma to replace the Samsung CRT in the living room which is on its way out. I know plasma is obsolete tech and a power hog. But it's worth it.

I have razor sharp eyesight, but have a problem with very bright backlights or high contrast on certain color combinations, especially in dim lighting. My CRT sets allow precise contrast control - plus my Nokia 19" CRT monitor that i calibrated myself can do resolutions that a similar size LCD can only dream of. My regular resolution is 1440x1080 (it's the highest it'll do at 85Hz), but i've run it as high as 1792x1344 at times. I've owned three 19" LCDs and sold all of them. I was like "buy broken monitor - fix it - keep it for a month - sell it for double what i got it for". I woulda kept one of them - a NEC with absolutely superb colors and the backlight could also be dimmed very low, but it flickered slightly at minimum brightness - lamps on their way out. It could have even lasted 5 more years - but i didn't want to take any chances. A 19" LCD on its own would be a downgrade from my boob tube, but put alongside of it and rotated to landscape, it's a nice addition. I plan to get another one sometime soon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivan Beaver
The nice thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from.
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post #8 of 8 Old 07-06-2011, 01:11 PM
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For CRT fans Plasma is the certainly the way to go. Closet thing we've got to CRT that is still currently made and available new. That's likely where I'll be turning once I need to replace my CRT unless something better comes along in the meantime.
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