Sony Trinitron WEGA RLOD Twenty Dollar Repair Guide - AVS Forum
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Sony Trinitron WEGA Repair Guide
Repair your rare WEGA for under twenty dollars.




I originally posted this Guide at Racketboy
http://www.racketboy.com/forum/viewt...p?f=52&t=32118


A special thanks to AVS Forum Message board, over fifty pages of related repairs here:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=928945

This repair is for various models of the Sony Trinitrons that carry power supply chips used for detection of CRT voltage draw. The chips are found on the WEGA series of SDCRT, EDCRT, HDCRT and Rear Projection TVs. I wrote this guide based on the HDCRT I own.

If you can pull a PC Motherboard its easy
The Guide may seem overwhelming, its just that I tried to detail every step of the repair with all the unknowns one might encounter. The actual repair is easy, just a little tricky when doing the desolder and solder work.

KV32HS500 Sony Wega HD CRT 4:3
D Board has two MCZ3001D Chips - A Board has no Chips



Note: Anyone who does this repair, please add a Reply with your experience in repairing your TV. Please include your model number as I did above. Also the identifying text showing which chips are on each board BEFORE THE REPAIR, either MCZ3001D, MCZ3001DB or whatever model number is labeled on the chips.



Not just a beautiful CRT but an uncommon HD CRT 4:3
I own a Sony WEGA HD CRT 4:3 and love it, goes from 480i all the way to 720p and 1080i. The perfect screen for retro gaming supporting RF all the way to HDMI with the DVI input. Everything from Atari to the Wii to Digital Cable all look great. HD TVs including HD CRTs do not support Lightguns, but that is covered by the Wii sensor bar. The main advantage of the CRT is no lag or Dot Crawl from up scaling the different resolutions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Niode View Post

CRT doesn't have a native resolution so you don't get the same issue you get with LCDs. CRTs just display the content in the resolution it was intended to be viewed in. No up scaling required.

A shaky temporary solution
The WEGA Trintron series do have a weakness of chips failing on the power supply D board. An indicator of the chip fail is upon pressing the power on, a Degauss sound followed by a few relay clicks and 6 to 7 blinks on the Standby Light. An indication of the D Board failing, usually the two chips.

Quote:
Originally Posted by homerging View Post

The Eastern Hemisphere market KV-HR and KV-HX models give 10 blinks for a D board error. Those TVs often contained MCZ3001DBs. 6 blinks from those models instead indicates an A board error.

If I leave the TV unplugged for a few hours and then plug back in, a maybe power on. I finally just left the TV on all the time. To avoid a burn on the phosphor screen of the CRT, I placed the TV input to HDMI which is hooked up to my cable box. The cable box puts out a black signal when off, so the TV input logo does not stays on, just the black screen. This worked pretty well in keeping the CRT at a dim black screen, that is until one day having a brain fart and accidentally turning the TV off.

Sony Memory Slot
My HD CRT has the memory card slot for reading JPGs from a Sony Memory Stick. It reads the older non Pro 128mb Magic Gate cards. The strange thing is during the initial seven light flash, the memory card slot LED lights up for a second. Curious why a memory card might be accessed before the TV is fully on.

Perhaps the memory card is accessed for a firmware update?

Hot Air
There is a temporary fix, should the TV fail to turn on. Of all things, a Hair Dryer blowing on the right bottom side of the TV after unplugged for a couple of hours. There is no humidity sensor inside the WEGA CRTs. Very strange but cooking the PCB thru the vent slot actually works!
Quote:
Originally Posted by jammer(six) View Post

http://www.jammersix.com/archives/so...up-how-to-fix/

Start by unplugging your TV set. Next, simply direct a hair dryer (on high heat) through the vents along the lower, back corner of the right side of your TV set. Here again, “right side” assumes that you’re looking at the TV set from the front. Let it blow through the vents for a good 2-3 minutes then plug it back in and fire it up. If you’re lucky, it will function normally.

When I tried this yesterday, it didn’t work at first. After a bit more blowing, however, the TV powered up and continued to work for the remainder of the day. This morning, it turned on just fine, but then failed to turn back on a short while later. We then tried it after lunch and it worked fine again (all without firing up the hair dryer).

It’s unclear to me why this works. It may be that the humidity sensor is going bad and had become, or perhaps there’s a problem with dust somehow interfering. It seems unlikely to be the latter, as the heat appears to be necessary to get things back up and running.

Prolonging the agony, the Hair Dryer trick will eventually no longer work.

Worth the fix
Even if your TV blink code might point to something else, try the Chip replacement first. Usually only one chip on the D Board fails. With all the work involved to get to the repair stage, its better to just go ahead and change both chips, adding sockets in case of a future fail. A tricky repair but very inexpensive depending on where you purchase the replacement chips. I had pretty good luck ordering online from TSM, even at regular shipping only took a few days to arrive. There are numerous models of the WEGA series that have the chip on the D Board. Some TVs also have an additional identical chip on the A Board, but these rarely fail.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TSM View Post

http://www.tristatemodule.com/p-7979...dengen-ic.aspx

MCZ3001DB Shindengen IC, pulse width modulation, 18 DIP



-Same as Sony 670581001, 670335501, and Hitachi CP08451U

-Recommended replacement for MCZ3001D, MCZ3001DA, 875967030

-Used on Sony D board power supplies. Locations IC6001, IC6501, or IC8002.

-Also used on Sony LCD rear projection modules

-Used in models:
KD30XS955, KDF-55XS955, KP46WT520, KV27FV310, KD32FS130, KDF-60WF655, KP51WS520, KV27HS420, KD34XBR960, KDF-60XS955, KP57WS520, KV-29DRC420, KD-34XBR970, KDFE42A10, KV20FS120, KV-29FA310, KD34XS955, KDF-E50A10, KV-21FA310, KV-29FS120, KD-36FS130, KDFE55A20, KV-21FM120, KV-30HS420, KD36XS955, KDFE60A20, KV21FS120, KV-32DX850, KDE55XBR950, KDP51WS655, KV24FS120, KV32FS120, KDF42E2000, KDP57WS655, KV-25FS120, KV-32FS320, KDF42WE655, KE42M1, KV-27FA310, KV32HS20, KDF50WE655, KF-42WE620, KV27FS120, KV-32HS420, KDF55WF655, KF-50WE620, KV-27FS320, KV32HV600, KV32XBR450, KV36FS120, KV36HS420, KV-38FS120, KV-34FS120, KV-36FS320, KV36XBR400, VPLHS20, KV34HS420, KV36HS20, KV-36HS500

-Replacement of the following parts along with the MCZ3001DB IC's is recommended
.1 Ohm 1/2W Fusible resistor (2 per board). Order 120293361
1200uF 250V Electrolytic capacitor (2 per board). Order 1200UF250V

Tools and Parts
1. Phillips Screwdrivers #1 and #2 - various lengths for clearance
2. Jewelers Screwdriver set - Phillips and Slotted
3. Offset slotted screwdriver - two position "Allen Wrench" bent design
4. Pencil Soldering Iron - around 30 watt
5. Soft Paint Brush - for cleaning off dust, can of air optional
6. Chip Puller or Needle Nose Pliers
7. Desolder Suction Tool
8. Flashlight - small easy to hold such as a bright Maglight
9. Magnifying Glass
10. Lamp - adjustable head to shine on work
11. Desolder Braid - already flux coated Radio Shack SKU 64-2090
12. Wirecutters - to cut Desolder Braid
13. Solder - small diameter preferably leaded solder
14. Parts tray - upside down frisbees make great parts trays.
15. Two 18 pin IC Sockets - Radio Shack SKU 276-1992
16. Two MCZ3001DB Chips - B series are a newer revised version of MCZ3001D

Offset Slotted Screwdriver with 90 degree tip



Sony Trinitron WEGA Landfill Prevention Kit



Two people to move
I had my neighbor give me a hand moving the HD Tube, 200 freeken pounds! MOST OF THE WEIGHT IS AT THE FRONT OF THE CRT. I staged a dresser in front of the wall unit, lucky a very close matched height.

Be sure not to wear belts on your pants, belt buckles are murder on the CRT anti glare coating. Wear a shirt untucked to cover the pants metal button.

Slide the TV out and disconnect the eight inputs and audio out to the receiver. Wrap tape around each cable input bundle and label to avoid guesstimating later which cable goes where. I have a wide mix of DVI converted to HDMI, Composite, SVideo and Component hooked up to various Game Consoles, Laser, DVD, CED and VHS. Even a couple RF inputs for Analog portion of the Digital HDMI cable box and Atari 5200.

Be sure to take notes and pics for reference later.



New HDs no longer have SVideo. Component also seems to be going away, most only have one input. HDMI taking over, seen a lot of newer HDs with four HDMI inputs.

Quote:


Keep the TV level and do not rotate the tube to the bottom for access to the back. The tube is heavy and sits on a cradle in the normal position, it might crack the front bezel if rotated.

Be sure to place some cardboard underneath to avoid scratching and possible damage to the bottom of the pull out Service Tray. I cannot emphasize enough about leaving the TV in the normal position, the very heavy tube is balanced in a cradle. My fireplace has a nice 13 inch step, so we spun the HD around and set it there. I wedged some cloth towels between the CRT and the fireplace doors to avoid scratching the glaze off the tube. Even though the TV is sticking out past the edge of the fireplace step, most of the weight is at the tube.



Let the TV sit for a couple of days for discharge. Be patient and wait, no way will I try to discharge with a screwdriver and risk damaging any capacitor from the surge. There are also heat sinks that need to cool down. :!:

Quote:


High voltage even when unplugged! Give time for discharge.

Remove eighteen Back Cover #2 screws
This can be done with the TV sitting normally, the screws are on the sides, top and back. There are no screws at the very bottom. Use a parts tray such as an upside down frisbee to store the screws. The black plastic for various inputs does not have to be removed, you can leave those screws in. It will help in supporting the rotated PCB later on.



Carefully slide off the back cover while lifting up the black input panel slightly. and take it outside to clean off all the dust. When cleaning the PCB, CRT and other components, have care not to bend any of the electronic components. A can of air is useful for blowing away the dust after the brushing.

Back of TV D Board on the Left - A Board on the Right
This particular model has no chip on the A Board so there is only the two on the D Board to worry about. Even if the A board has a chip, the D Board chips are usually the ones that fail.



Identify the MCZ3001D chips
Locate the two chips on the left at the D Board where the CRT is connected to the Flyback transformer. Most TVs have the older MCZ3001D chips, some might be the newer MCZ3001DB revision. Even the newer though not as common revised chips have been know to fail. It is best to replace either with the more reliable MCZ3001DB revision chips.

Quote:


The chips are labeled as either MCZ3001D or MCZ3001DB.
The locations on the D Board are IC8002 and IC6501.

D Board, the chips are located between the Flyback Transformer and two large black Capacitors.



Quote:


Some have replaced the chips by rotating the tube to the bottom for repairs. Then cutting the plastic rib on the frame with a dremel and repair without removing the PCB.

A risk of damaging the PCB from the cutting and harder to install the chip. Removing the PCB is really easy, its just a few screws and connectors. The main Flyback Transformer and Power Connectors do not have to be removed.

The heavy CRT is sitting on a cradle in the normal position and could crack the front bezel if rotated.

PCB Slide Out Tray
The two PCBs slide out as a unit sitting in a plastic tray. On the left and right light gray plastic frame there are release latches. These are located near each corner of the CRT at the bottom all the way inside of each outer black CRT bottom cradle. Lift the latches up while sliding one side at a little at a time. Do not attempt to slide the tray all the way out to the Service position. Move the tray assembly just enough, out around five inches for better access to the connectors and screws.



Identify Seven Connectors
Each electrical connector is different, but to be safe write down or take a photo to be sure. Remove all the connectors off the D Board EXCEPT THE FLYBACK TRANSFORMER AND THE MAIN POWER LEADS. The fatter wires are difficult to pull and may be damaged if pulled too hard. The fat cables have enough slack left plugged in when rotating the PCB. A small connector is on the A Board, be sure to pull it for clearance.

A Board and D Board 4 transition latches
Between the two boards are four black transition block "latches". These lock the two boards together and also provide electrical connections between the two PCBs. On my TV the latches pull up from the D Board side.

Quote:


Do not lift the transition block too high, you might bend the metal transition connections.

Two transition blocks can be lifted with your thumb and finger and pulled up. A better method is using an offset slotted screwdriver, which will be needed on the difficult to reach ones. Place the tongue of the screwdriver under one corner of the black plastic transition and lift slightly. Have a good controlled grip as not to pull too high and cause damage. Then lift the other corner to free the transition block. Lift up just enough so the block swivels clear of the D Board. DO NOT LIFT TOO HIGH AND BEND THE METAL. All you need is enough to slide the PCB clear.

Transition blocks are at the top in the pic below. The left two blocks are popped up, two right ones seated. Note the light gray plastic holding the PCB down to help in lifting the transition blocks. The PCB slides out from under the gray plastic. The fat red Flyback Transformer cable and the blue/red/yellow wired power cable connector can stay connected.



Identify eight #1 PCB screws
The screws are removed after the connectors and transition blocks are clear. Remove the screws holding down the D Board, note some holes have no screws. Place the PCB screws separate of the back cover screws in another parts tray such as a second upside down frisbee.

The only thing holding the PCB are some plastic gray tabs on the tray. Squeeze slightly while lifting a section of the PCB at a time. Not too high as to flex the board, that would stress the solder points on the PCB. After all tabs are clear, lift the PCB, slide clear of the gray tab between the pair of transition blocks, then rotate and set on its edge leaned against the video input panel.

Be careful the PCB is stable sitting on end and sensitive electrical parts do not get damaged.



Locate the chips
Compare the chip location to the bottom green soldered side. Each chip has a white rectangle pattern on the green side. Note that two of each chip's eighteen legs are not soldered. Also note that there are two chip solder pads for each chip joining other non chip solder pads. In addition, some of the chip pads have a narrow exposed trace going to another component.



Socket or no socket
There was posts at other boards about the IC sockets might be unreliable due to high voltage. The voltage and amp draw can't be that high for the chips, seems the contacts and legs could handle it. Convenient Sockets are the way to go, a possible second repair years later of desoldering and soldering may damage the PCB. Because of some owners having to do the repair a second time, I am definitely going with sockets.

Quote:


Note that each chip has a small notch on one end, used in identifying which way the chip goes. Be sure of the orientation on the PCB before removing the chip.

The meticulous part
This is the trickiest part of the whole job. Desoldering the old chips without damaging the PCB. Be sure to use good lighting and a good Soldering Pencil Iron with a fine point sharpened cleanly with a file. Use a Magnifying Glass continually to verify your work. Start by tinning the freshly sharpened point of the Solder Iron with some solder. Flick off as much solder as you can onto a sheet of cardboard. The idea is to remove solder and not add any to the soldered pads. There are a couple of methods to remove the solder.

Quote:


Do not overheat the solder contact pads or forcibly remove the chips. The traces on the PCB could be damaged.

Desolder Suction Tool
Test the tool to see how it works. Push the plunger in until it locks. Cover the suction tip with your finger and press the release button. The plunger should not go all he way up because of you finger holding a vacuum at the tip. Remove your finger and observe how the plunger pops all the way up.

Before heating an electrical pad, be sure to have the suction tool in standby position with the plunger locked down. Heat up the the solder pad, remove Solder Iron. Quicky cover the melted solder pad with the suction tip and press the release button. It will suck up any solder that is in the melted fluid state.

Desolder Wick
The Desolder Wick is a copper braid and is flux coated. First try heating it with the solder gun away from the PCB to see how it works while cleaning the Solder Iron. Note how the wick draws in the solder from the solder gun tip. Every time you heat up the wick and draw in solder, it cannot be used again. The flux is burned off and you want to prevent introducing the drawn in solder back onto the PCB. Cut off the wick with the wire cutters, a little extra off to have a clean unheated flux coating braid.

Prepare the wick first by pinching with your fingers, offering a tighter point for better desolder control. Place the wick point over the solder pad and heat up the wick with the solder gun. Be careful not to overheat that might damage the solder pad on the PCB. The wick will draw in the solder onto its copper braid underneath.

Residual Solder
If you are still having trouble removing the solder you can try this. Do this only after you have removed as much solder as possible with the above two methods first. MELTED SOLDER RUNOFF COULD SHORT OTHER COMPONENTS. That said, I had a couple of chip legs that were still stuck with just a little solder in the hole. Heat up the leg and solder pad. While the melted solder is in a fluid state purse your lips and blow or use a can of air. Works faster then getting the suction tool into position, but risky where the melted solder lands. This is why a last resort.

Look closely at each desoldered Chip leg, check for clearance movement with a tiny Slotted Screwdriver.



Verify each Chip leg
As you do each leg, check you progress with a magnifying glass. The PCB white marking will burn a little. That is okay as long as the solder pad does not get damaged or pulled up. Use a small slotted jewelers screwdriver, wiggle each leg to be sure it is clear of the PCB. TO PREVENT DAMAGE TO THE PCB, DO NOT FORCIBLY REMOVE THE CHIP. Once you confirm all legs are straight and free of the PCB, pull the chip with a Chip Puller or Needle Nose Pliers. You can also use the Off Set Screwdriver, do not force the old chip out.

Congratulate yourself, you have done the toughest part of the job. Soldering is tricky but not as difficult as a desolder. Because of all the risks of desolder and soldering, go with chip sockets and never have to melt solder on the PCB again.

Prepare the Chip Sockets and Chips
Both the chips and sockets have a small notch to match up with each other. Try to plug the new chips in the 18 pin sockets halfway in. Do not go all the way since they are hard to separate. You might have to bend the chip legs in slightly before inserting into the sockets. Once satisfied of the smooth transition place the chips to one side.

Quote:


Do not use the old desoldered chips to test plug into the sockets. The old chip legs are thicker, coated with old solder. The solder coated chip legs might bend the socket connectors too wide. There is also a risk of solder scraping off and shorting out the socket housing.

Note the PCB has a black dot signifying the same end as the notch on the chips you removed. Place the new 18 pin sockets with the notch at the black dot end. The socket will actually work either way, but the mark on the board gets covered by the socket when put on wrong. Might as well keep all marks in the correct alignment. Do not force the socket into the PCB small 18 holes, it should drop in easily.

Solder the 18 pin socket
Remember the two points that did not have solder? Inspect the PCB closely with a magnifying glass to verify which holes do not have a solder pad. While holding the chip socket in place bend the legs on just those two pads. Be careful the bent legs are clear of any electrical contact point. The 18 pin socket is held in place on one side with the two bent legs. :wink:

Quote:


Use just a little solder to avoid runoff and shorting the electrical pads together.

Always heat both the leg protruding and the electrical pad for good solder flow. USE VERY LITTLE SOLDER. Try soldering just one connection and check your results with a Magnifying Glass. Flick off any excess solder off the solder iron before continuing. As you solder the legs, you will find there is enough solder melted on the Solder Iron tip to do two or three electrical pads. Avoid feeding more solder on each leg to prevent too much solder dripping.

Magnifying Glass inspection
Scrutinize that every socket leg has solder on the pad covering the hole completely. Be sure there is no "cold solder" connections where the solder did not flow and stick the the chip legs and solder pads. Also be sure each socket chip leg solder pad is not shorted with each other. A couple of the chip socket solder pads do have another non chip solder pad connected next to it, that is normal.

Upper Chip Socket soldered, lower Chip Socket not soldered yet. Note the inactive legs are bent to hold the 18 pin socket in place, two on each chip socket location.



Install the new Chips
Inspect the chip for the notch and be sure of the orientation before inserting. Carefully align the chip legs with the sockets to avoid bending a leg. If the chip legs were pretested and bent to fit earlier, then should be an easy fit. Use the Magnifying Glass to be sure all the legs are lined up with all the holes of the 18 pin socket.

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Scrutinize the notch alignment of the chip, socket and PCB.

The chips can be removed if accidentally put in backwards, but a risk of bending some of the legs. While supporting the bottom of the PCB push down the chip in the middle. Push the chip again at each end to ensure proper seating. Do the same with the other chip, again checking the notch and leg alignment.

Be sure the notch is matched on the PCB, Socket and Chip. Upper chip not installed yet.



Reinstall the D Board
Slide the PCB back in place. Note that it has to go under the gray plastic tab by the transition blocks next to the A Board first. Squeeze each gray plastic frame tab one at a time to seat the PCB. After the D Board is seated in the frame, replace the 8 screws back in their original locations. Be sure to start all screws before tightening any.

Verify alignment and push each transition block back down, locking each corner. Refer to any notes and pics to confirm the electrical connectors. Carefully align each connector before plugging back in. Don't forget the connector on the A Board.

Quote:


Double check and inspect each screw, connector, transition block and both of the chips orientation.

Earth Quakes and Climbing Kids
I mentioned earlier how the CRT is front heavy, so decided to add a way of tying down the back more securely. Here in Southern CA of Earth Quakes, a good preventative measure. Also in case of a curious exploring climbing kid. I had a safety wire attached to an anchor on the wall and the back cover plastic AC cable hanger, but it was never a good solid anchor. In fact the cable hanger broke when I pulled the wire clear. A solid anchor is needed, I don't know why this was not factory installed. :?

Match up a threaded bolt, nut and two large fender washers. The bolt has to be just long enough to accommodate the thickness if the back cover plastic, the two fender washers, nut and a little extra for drilling a hole for safety wire. Be sure the bolt is not too long as to increase the depth of the CRT TV case. Drill out the hole in the threaded portion of the bolt tip for the safety wire to thread and anchor into.



When placing the bolt in the back of the case be sure it will not short on any internal electronics. I drilled out the hole in the back light gray TV cover where the old AC hanger hanger was before. It has plenty of clearance internally and is shorter then the plastic above. Mount the bolt with a fender washer on each side and prestage a length of safety wire thru the hole in the bolt thread before sliding the TV back in the shelf.



Replace the back cover with the 18 screws
Slide the back cover back on while lifting the black plastic video input panel up slightly. Be sure the AC cord is clear. Start all the eighteen screws before tightening any. Be sure to get a friend to lift the front heavy CRT back into the stand. Plug in all cables, slide the TV back into viewing position and cross fingers and toes.

The moment of truth
Be ready to turn the volume down on the TV panel. Sometimes it defaults to full blast on power up. Plug in the AC cord, the TV might power on without hitting the power button. You will hear a pop of the Degauss followed by a couple relay clicks. Then the TV will turn on. Start laughing hysterically because the TV now works, laugh maddening hysterically if it doesn't work.

If the TV works, I doubt if you will want to turn it off. Enjoy gaming, movies or regular TV for the rest of the day reaping in your DIY repair glory. AVOID TURNING OFF THEN BACK ON UNTIL THE TV HAS COOLED DOWN FOR A FEW HOURS. Maybe an over precaution, but since WEGAs are becoming rare, do what you can to keep your TV around.



The D Board two chips are the most common fail on Wega TVs
A shame so many WEGA Trinitron TVs get tossed because of the chips failing. Expensive to get repaired at a Service Center, but inexpensive for the DIY repair. Though a meticulous repair, the two chips are under twenty bucks shipped.

References

The very first Thread where I discovered about this inexpensive Repair:
http://k0lee.com/2011/05/fixing-a-so...-7-blink-code/

The Hair Dryer temporary fix: http://www.jammersix.com/archives/so...up-how-to-fix/

My earlier posts detailing initial steps of the repair:
http://www.racketboy.com/forum/viewt...434526#p434526
http://www.racketboy.com/forum/viewt...458437#p458437

I bought the MCZ3001DB Chips here, under twenty bucks shipped:
http://www.tristatemodule.com/p-7979...dengen-ic.aspx

A great read, over fifty pages of Sony Wega owners repairing with the chip.
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=928945


CRT, LCD, Video Inputs, Lightgun HD and More Guides
http://www.racketboy.com/forum/viewt...204314#p204314

Addendum
I always advocate how great CRT Tubes are for a clear and bright pic viewed from any angle, with no upscaling issues for Retro Gaming Consoles. Here is another advantage of the a good quality bulky CRT. A built in surround sound system, check out the "Bose Reflect" Bass Box for the third speaker in the middle. I always wondered why my Sony has sounded so good with a True Surround sound option right in the TV Menu. You won't find a good direct reflect Bass Box inside any LCD, LED or Plasma Flat screen. Match this with a couple of amplified speakers on each side of the couch and enjoy the thunder.

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post #2 of 84 Old 10-13-2011, 02:09 PM
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Having repaired a lot of these Sony's over the years I can attest that this is one of the easiest repairs for these WEGA's. These MCZ3001D's are always failing. I've seen them in all kinds of Sony TV's and even in other brands.

On a side note CRTGamer. I've repaired over a dozen KV-27FS120 and 32FS120 that had a peculiar problem.
They would not start-up and flash 6-7 blinks. But use the error diagnostic function (tv closed press DISPLAY, 5, VOL+, POWER) and the TV would start right up. The cause was zero-detect circuit would fail. (on some projection TV's it was written ZCD (zero-cross detect) in the self-diagnosis) This I have found to be more common even than the MCZ3001D's failing (unless the problem is related to them). I just jump the relay that the microprocessor does not want to trigger and the TV works great and haven't had a comeback since.

Have u ever tried entering self-diagnosis mode when the TV was blinking?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neccrttv View Post

Having repaired a lot of these Sony's over the years I can attest that this is one of the easiest repairs for these WEGA's. These MCZ3001D's are always failing. I've seen them in all kinds of Sony TV's and even in other brands.

On a side note CRTGamer. I've repaired over a dozen KV-27FS120 and 32FS120 that had a peculiar problem.
They would not start-up and flash 6-7 blinks. But use the error diagnostic function (tv closed press DISPLAY, 5, VOL+, POWER) and the TV would start right up. The cause was zero-detect circuit would fail. (on some projection TV's it was written ZCD (zero-cross detect) in the self-diagnosis) This I have found to be more common even than the MCZ3001D's failing (unless the problem is related to them). I just jump the relay that the microprocessor does not want to trigger and the TV works great and haven't had a comeback since.

Have u ever tried entering self-diagnosis mode when the TV was blinking?

A shame so many WEGAs get dumped over the bad chips. Never went into the Factory Setting Menu, just straight to the repair. The Service Menu is a good idea on a dead TV, an option one can try over soldering. I am not keen on using a Factory Service Menu on a working TV though. It would be my luck of hitting the wrong code and bricking the now rare HD 4:3 CRT.

@ neccrttv - I am interested in make/model numbers of TVs that have the chips, can you post a list of any you repaired?
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post #4 of 84 Old 10-14-2011, 06:41 AM
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I prefer to go by chassis than model number since almost a lot of models in your list share the same chassis.
I don't know if I can make of list of those I repaired... but this is a list of all models (maybe some others) that have MCZ3001's.
1: BA-6 Chassis
KV21FM100 BA6 Sony
KV29FA515 BA6 Sony
KV29FA315 BA6 Sony
KV21FA515 BA6 Sony
KV21FA315 BA6 Sony
KV29FS120 BA6 SONY
KV29FS100 BA6 ? (BA5D ?) SONY
KV29FA540 BA6 SONY
KV29FA340 BA6 SONY
KV29FA310 BA6 SONY
KV27FS120 BA6 SONY
KV27FA310 BA6 SONY
KV25FV300 BA6 SONY
KV25FS120 BA6 SONY
KV25FS100 BA6 SONY
KV24FS120 BA6 SONY
KV24FS100 BA6 SONY
KV21FS120 BA6 SONY
KV21FS100 BA6 SONY
KV21FM120 BA6 SONY
KV21FA540 BA6 SONY
KV21FA340 BA6 SONY
KV21FA310 BA6 SONY
KV21FA210 BA6 SONY
KV20FS120 BA6 SONY
KV14FV300 BA6 SONY

2: DA-4 -This is Sony's main HD chassis used in your TV CRTGAMER
KV42DRC800 DA4 SONY
KV40XBR800 DA4 SONY
KV38DRC500 DA4 SONY
KV36XBR800 DA4 SONY
KV36HS500 DA4 SONY
KV36HS420 DA4 SONY
KV34XBR800 DA4 SONY
KV34HS420 DA4 SONY
KV34DRC500 DA4 SONY
KV32HV600 DA4 SONY
KV32HS500 DA4 SONY
KV32HS420 DA4 SONY
KV30HS420 DA4 SONY
KV29DRC420 DA4 SONY
KV27HS420 DA4 SONY
KP65WV600 DA4X SONY
KP60WV600 DA4X SONY
KP57WV600 DA4X SONY
KD34XS955 DA4 SONY
KD30XS955 DA4 SONY
KD34XBR960 DA4 SONY
KD34XBR970 DA4 SONY
(this list is missing a few maybe)

3: DX-1A Chassis (This is the HD chassis used in previous XBR models and others.
KV40XBR700 DX1A Sony
KV42DRC700 DX1A SONY
KV36XBR450H DX1A SONY
KV36XBR450 DX1A SONY
KV36XBR400 DX1A SONY
KV36HS20H DX1A SONY
KV36HS20 DX1A SONY
KV32XBR450 DX1A SONY
KV32XBR400 DX1A SONY
KV32HS20 DX1A SONY
KV42DRC700 DX1A SONY

more to come....
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post #5 of 84 Old 10-14-2011, 06:57 AM
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4: AX1X chassis - Used in projection CRT'S - Another model that I repaired for the ZCD (zero cross detect) problem.
KP51WS520 AX1X SONY
KP46WT520 AX1X SONY
KP57WS520 AX1X SONY
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post #6 of 84 Old 10-14-2011, 08:26 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neccrttv View Post

I prefer to go by chassis than model number since almost a lot of models in your list share the same chassis.
I don't know if I can make of list of those I repaired... but this is a list of all models (maybe some others) that have MCZ3001's.

THANKYOU!
Anyone who has problems with their Sony can verify from the list if their TV has the marginal chips is inside.

If you Sony is on the list, maybe order the inexpensive chips while you can still get them. Just in case of a future breakdown.

I posted your list at my Guide on Racketboy, Thanks!
http://www.racketboy.com/forum/viewt...458439#p458439
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post #7 of 84 Old 10-16-2011, 07:20 PM
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Thank you very, very much for this helpful guide, CRTGAMER! I used the version on racketboy.com and it helped me out a great deal in my successful repair!
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post #8 of 84 Old 10-29-2011, 09:00 AM
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Did mine. Got the same parts as most: MCZ3001DB and sockets. Took about 30 minutes and is working like a champ!

Thanks for all the writeups!!
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post #9 of 84 Old 10-29-2011, 04:07 PM
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After a 2 min power outage my KV34XBR910 would not turn on and showed the 7 blink service code. I am ordering the parts and I'm going to give it a shot.

Thanks again,

Jim
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post #10 of 84 Old 11-06-2011, 10:48 AM
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I have a kv32fs120 that died after being repeatedly turned on and off by my 2 yr old twins, grr, it makes the degaussing sound and clicks once or twice, light blinks 4 times, 1 time, pauses on for a second, blinks 5 times twice then nothing. Sounds like a lot I know, lol, I don't know which light sequence I should consider to be the trouble code but I've been going on the 5 blinks. I heard it could be the HOT, or the vertical deflector , among other things but the component numbers don't match up to anyones descriptions. Also it has a A, C and V board, thats it. So, I'm a little lost on this one. Any Ideas? could it be the mcz3001?
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post #11 of 84 Old 11-07-2011, 09:04 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xray39 View Post

After a 2 min power outage my KV34XBR910 would not turn on and showed the 7 blink service code. I am ordering the parts and I'm going to give it a shot.

Thanks again,

Jim

Good luck on the Repair, please post your results and which model chips were originally in the PCB.

Quote:
Originally Posted by julvstal View Post

I have a kv32fs120 that died after being repeatedly turned on and off by my 2 yr old twins, grr, it makes the degaussing sound and clicks once or twice, light blinks 4 times, 1 time, pauses on for a second, blinks 5 times twice then nothing. Sounds like a lot I know, lol, I don't know which light sequence I should consider to be the trouble code but I've been going on the 5 blinks. I heard it could be the HOT, or the vertical deflector , among other things but the component numbers don't match up to anyones descriptions. Also it has a A, C and V board, thats it. So, I'm a little lost on this one. Any Ideas? could it be the mcz3001?

It could be many things, the chips are under twenty bucks and have showed a trend of failing. My WEGA also died because of a repeat turn on cycle from my daughter. Try the two chip replacement first on the D Board, be sure to get the B model stated in the Guide. Good luck!
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post #12 of 84 Old 11-07-2011, 01:51 PM
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julvstal, please try the diagnostic menu too.. ((on the remote)Display, 5 , vol - (down) then Power while the tv is closed) and tell me if it starts up when in the service menu. If it does, big chances its the mcz3001 or a zero detect problem like i have encountered in lots of FS120 models. If it doesn't start up it could be a supply or flyback/HOT problem but i doubt it.
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post #13 of 84 Old 11-12-2011, 07:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by julvstal View Post

I have a kv32fs120 that died after being repeatedly turned on and off by my 2 yr old twins, grr, it makes the degaussing sound and clicks once or twice, light blinks 4 times, 1 time, pauses on for a second, blinks 5 times twice then nothing. Sounds like a lot I know, lol, I don't know which light sequence I should consider to be the trouble code but I've been going on the 5 blinks. I heard it could be the HOT, or the vertical deflector , among other things but the component numbers don't match up to anyones descriptions. Also it has a A, C and V board, thats it. So, I'm a little lost on this one. Any Ideas? could it be the mcz3001?

I have the same TV, same problem (except it was my 4yr old boy). Diagnostic menu did not work...


Any help for julvstal would be appreciated by me as well....
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post #14 of 84 Old 11-13-2011, 04:56 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adabro View Post

I have the same TV, same problem (except it was my 4yr old boy). Diagnostic menu did not work...


Any help for julvstal would be appreciated by me as well....

You both need to try the chips
If by chance it does not work, the investment is less then twenty dollars! There has been pretty good success of TVs working again when replacing both chips on the D Board.
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post #15 of 84 Old 11-15-2011, 12:36 AM
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I just replaced the two chips and I tried turning it on and I get 5 standby blinks and nothing.....I REALLY want this thing fixed ...like tonight...
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post #16 of 84 Old 11-15-2011, 01:56 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by interceptor1985 View Post

I just replaced the two chips and I tried turning it on and I get 5 standby blinks and nothing.....I REALLY want this thing fixed ...like tonight...

Did you use sockets? If so, try swapping the new chips to the other socket, just in case one chip is marginal. Maybe also try a re-melt of ALL the solder connections. Can you post a pic of the solder job?
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post #17 of 84 Old 12-15-2011, 10:27 AM
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Hi all and particularly neccrttv since he has the experience I probably need to tap,

I have a KV32XBR400 and did the chip replacement several years ago, which fixed the blinking light/not turning on problem. Since then, I have encountered a different but probably related problem.

After viewing for a while, when the image has a lot of white (and/or at higher brightness settings), the image starts to "zoom in" or "bloom out" or expand to overfill the screen. The amount of expansion fluctuates with the image brightness. It does this for a while and then eventually the image expands to some upper limit on a particularly bright/white scene and then the crt shuts completely off. Turning the tv off for about 20 seconds and then back on usually resets it and it works fine again for a variable period of time from minutes to hours. I have tried to trouble shoot this a few times but I can never get it to happen with the back off the TV (heat related?), and I am not willing to just leave it with the back off forever due to the HV safety issues.

I understand that the zooming in must be the HV supply voltage collapsing, and that the collapse is related to higher current levels/load on the HV supply at the higher brightness. But I am have no experience as to what the likely culprits are in the HV supply circuit that would be causing this problem.

We have been living with this problem for years, literally. But I would love to fix it once and for all. It is a great TV in all other respects.

For those providing advice, I have a fair amount of experience with electronics repair of many types, but not a lot with CRT/TV HV circuits. I own an oscilloscope and DVM.

Thanks in advance!
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post #18 of 84 Old 12-15-2011, 12:03 PM
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Replied in a PM but it can be the MCZ badly driving the HV regulation circuit.
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post #19 of 84 Old 12-15-2011, 12:12 PM
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So, just replace the chip(s) again is the fix? Hope he installed the replacement with sockets.
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post #20 of 84 Old 12-15-2011, 02:15 PM
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the hair dryer trick

yes it works

heat the area of the bad MCZ3001D chips from the out side the case
your lower right hand front side when standing in front of the tv tube
3rd column from front bottom row of side vent slots [on my 32 hs420]
is about where I aim

heat 5 to 15 minutes [depends on how hot how strong the blower and you aim]
try the power button or remote repeatedly
when it comes on leave it on [switch to blank channel or input]
my tv has been on about 3 weeks now

see next post for more wega bs
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post #21 of 84 Old 12-15-2011, 02:27 PM
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GOOD THREAD BTW


ok separate question
I did not want to clutter the dryer trick POST

my tv a 32hs420 's chips went bad in 09
replaced with 3001D chips
they died about 2 years later
I used sockets
so I fliped the chip's positions
tv worked BUT DIED a few weeks later

hair dryer trick got it up and stays on now

but will the new chips die quickly AGAIN ?

HOW MANY HAVE REPEATEDLY RECHIP THEIR WEGA'S

AND THE STANDARD CHIP QUESTIONS

CAN I GET A NON -CHINA MADE CHIP OR AT LEAST A BETTER ONE ANYWHERE ?

ANY LINKS TO SMALL CHIP LOT SELLERS WITH BETTER CHIPS ?

WHAT ELSE OTHER THEN BAD CAP'S [BULGED] TO CHECK FOR
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post #22 of 84 Old 12-16-2011, 02:30 AM
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The AX-1 chassis KV-HR36, KV-HR32, and the KV-HX32, and probably the KV-DA32 also had the MCZ3001D chip.

All MCZ3001DB chips are the same.

They die alot so buy some spares.

Not every time the TV stops working will mean the chip has failed. Temperature cycling can mean a chip pops its insertion-force socket so try reseating the chip before giving up on it.

Can anybody comment on the best type of socket to resist temperature cycling? Machine pinned sockets are supposed to provide better contact. I guess a ZIF socket would be best but tin plated ZIF sockets are hard to find.

There are a couple of electrolyte capacitors and fusible resistors on the d-board that can also fail and provide similar symptoms. I haven't seen any reports of them failing, though.
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post #23 of 84 Old 12-16-2011, 06:06 AM
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My supplier of MCZ3001DB supplies two types of MCZ3001DB. One is a Shindengen MCZ, the other is an original Sony Japan made IC. Nota, you can buy the Japan made chips if u want, but i can't guarantee if they will be that much better than the chinese ones, although they probably are.
EDIT : Seems the Shindengen are the same as the Sony OEM ones sold there, (thats why i never buy the Sony one's lol 10$ more.. )
Here's a link
http://www.richtechparts.com/search....search=mcz3001

http://www.richtechparts.com/i-3803-..._ORIGINAL.html
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post #24 of 84 Old 12-16-2011, 07:28 AM
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I take it back... it looks like there could be Chinese MCZ3001DB chips about now so I would stick to reputable retailers who source from Shindengen.

I don't think Sony makes MCZ3001DBs. Companies have their own supply chains for third party parts to make margins from repairs. Shindengen is also a Japanese company.

amazon.com/Sony-IC-MCZ3001DB/dp/B001DGL2W0/
amazon.com/SHINDENGEN-MCZ3001DB-Replaces-MCZ3001DA-670581001/dp/B005QOOACY/

The Sony part also has Shindengen stamped on it. \\

You may find this link interesting
hometheatershack.com/forums/sony/15857-no-power-6-7-blink-led-pattern.html
I guess that means it's a good idea to keep your fingers off the metal pins. He says a poor quality socket can actually lead to the TV being damaged. The DeOxit is a good tip.

A method of soldering machined pin sockets:
pin-logic.com/how_to_install_a_machine_pin_soc.htm
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post #25 of 84 Old 12-16-2011, 11:20 AM
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any expert ideas on what the hair dryer trick is doing
what part fail if cold but is ok when hot ?
is it the chip it's self or some other bit ?
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post #26 of 84 Old 12-16-2011, 02:34 PM
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I would find it very unlikely that the IC itself is working correctly once heated...
My bet is that the reason the hair dryer trick works is that the cause is more bad solders on the IC (or socket if one was used).
It could also be capacitors.. but that would work for a while and as soon as the TV is cold it wouldnt start up anymore.
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post #27 of 84 Old 12-18-2011, 01:26 AM
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CRTGAMER:

'Bout a month ago my Sony Trinitron kv-36hs500 from 2002 (gifted 2 years ago by a wealthy client upgrading to an HDMI LCD, and which was often left on in a tight fitting cabinet) failed to instantly activate one day, and only after numerous tries. Got it back on two more times, and then 7 blinks of death had me pondering letting it gather dust rather than paying another $100 bucks to haul it downstairs to the car, not to mention recycling fees, and getting it out of the car again...

So I took the model number and followed where google may lead all the way to your very helpful page. Got the chips from TSM verbatim your links, and ordered the sockets there to boot, which came to Colorado within two days in regular mail.

Then with limited finances, I sought to borrow solder supplies without success, until today when extra funds coincided with the radio shack beginner kit on sale, along with desolder braid, tip cleaner, ultra-fine solder, a set of offset screwdrivers, and a lit magnifying glass came to another $80, so about $100 invested in this wacky venture to fix the Wega.

Had originally pulled off the back to blow out the dust (oh the slim hope), then came across this thread and verified the position of things and what it'd take. As I haven't come close to this kind of work since 8th grade shop in '84, it was with some trepidation that I resolved to try, and ordered the parts.

Looked at a video of desoldering with braid, and have a pretty decent head for responding to the flow of materials, and so, without practice, but carefully heeding your excellent warnings, I pulled off the back, detached and propped the D-board, and very cautiously, I finally took the plunge and desoldered the first, most isolated pin.

Couple times my technique was ill-considered, and the tip skittered across a trace overlay, and I did scream (seemingly no damage, thankfully), but soon found good neutral positioning with easy control, and the wick just drew out the solder, even despite having forgotten to clip the protruding pins on the first chip. The new kit came with a pronged pickup tool, and the old chip easily pulled free first time.

Found it helped to stop and clean the tip about every 3-4 pins, and after snipping them off, the next one came free just as easily. Popped in the sockets, using the bent pin to hold position, but used a finger also to hold in place while soldering the upper right and lower left, just to guarantee a tight fit. Soldering was easier, and with the fine stuff, it didn't collect on the tip, and amazingly looked almost identical to the old solder points when finished.

It couldn't be this easy? Another fellow on the thread regarding the anamorphic CRT Trinitron indicated that this is work for reasonably proficient people, so I was sure I'd missed something. Popped in the pre-fitted chips with some fumbles and curses, but with care to position them the same as the old, thanks to your thoughtful write-up.

Got the board screwed down and found I'd failed to fit it under a plastic lip next to the black clips on the upper right part of the board, though the clips had still popped in place despite it, which had me worried some extra stress might've affected them, especially when one popped up a bit too high when I undid it with some impatience (more cursing given how fragile they seemed and the need to not lift higher than absolutely necessary).

Fastened it all back down, connected back the wires, slid the tray back, put the back back on. Held my breath. Wondered if I'd soon be laughing hysterically or maddening hysterically?

For now, my laughter is merely hysterical!! It turned right on! The color was a little off on the left side (it has had issues in the past), so I did the worst and turned it off and right back on. No problem, the color righted itself, and the sound of the degausser is much quieter than before.

Very, very cool beans. Thank you so much for all your excellent and comprehensive directions, so straightforward a guy with just enough ability to pop the memory upgrade into a desktop was able to execute a repair on one of the more advanced CRT's ever made. The photos, the tool/parts list, the cautions, etc: all evidence of a stellar gift for instruction! Huzza!

Final note: having bookmarked this link a month ago, I didn't check newer posts before beginning, and now saw lcaillo's thread on the HomeTheaterShack link in which he advises against using sockets, as they can vary in quality, to properly clean pins before seating them, and to beware of cheaper chips.

I trust the chips, am reasonably confident about the sockets, but didn't think to clean them, though they mostly sat in their packaging until use. Mostly though, I didn't see his advise to use more solder to penetrate more deeply along the pins, though it hasn't made an immediate difference.

More importantly, if this does happen again, I feel reasonably confident that I'd be able to troubleshoot, thanks again, to CRTGAMER.

Final question, I think the picture may have drifted about a half inch to the left of center, and recall reading about an adjustment for that. Can anyone tell me what that was?

And one more time: THANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOU. At the very least, for not being forced to move the monstrosity from its perch, and for helping me to feel pretty dang empowered at the moment!
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post #28 of 84 Old 12-18-2011, 10:23 PM
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Quote:


Final question, I think the picture may have drifted about a half inch to the left of center, and recall reading about an adjustment for that.

That's probably down to a shift in voltage or impact on the set during the repair. You can adjust the geometry and overscan settings in the service menu. But be careful as too many people have reset everything to defaults which can effectively brick the TV.
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=531494
Do disable the red push while you're at it.
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post #29 of 84 Old 12-18-2011, 10:29 PM
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Always write down every setting in the service menu, or take a screenshot photograph of every setting with a camera, before making ANY changes. This will be your ONLY lifeline if you screw anything up, nobody here can help out with default settings as nobody's default settings will be exactly the same as yours.
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post #30 of 84 Old 12-30-2011, 09:58 PM
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Ok, Apparently, when I soldered in the sockets I got one in backwards but the chip itself was in properly, think that would have caused my issue I was having? btw the soldering job was beautiful, I cleaned the board of old solder then used flux and alcohol to get the old nasty stuff off worked like a charm there...just wish the tv started up..lol This is what happens when you repair electronics blind (glasses busted at the time) I think I will try again this time without the sockets and with an even smaller tip on the Iron.

:Edit: instead of De-soldering braid I used a pen with a metal tip, duct tape a medicine bottle, and a Shop-Vac to Mc Gyver together a solder sucker, worked like a charm without costing me 75-200 bucks.


:Edit#2:

Ok Its all back together, Now I do not get any blinks...But the screen doesn't seem to turn on, I pushed the button, it makes some relay sounds....seems like it is on...blank screen as if it is off, no menu or anything. I have the remote but I did not touch it at all I was saving that till the sucker works.
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