Sony Trinitron kd-36fs170 issues - AVS Forum
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Old 11-09-2014, 05:57 PM - Thread Starter
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Sony Trinitron kd-36fs170 issues

I just got this tv from craigslist for gaming and there's 2 problems with it. There's thin black lines running horizontal across the whole screen and there's a high pitch ringing when its on. Are these issues related? Any fix?

Edit: Looking closer it looks like a grid of black lines, almost like every pixel is being separated. I haven't used a tube tv is years, is this normal? Maybe I am sitting too close.
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Last edited by eric37428; 11-09-2014 at 11:08 PM.
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Old 11-10-2014, 08:50 AM
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Originally Posted by eric37428 View Post
I just got this tv from craigslist for gaming and there's 2 problems with it. There's thin black lines running horizontal across the whole screen and there's a high pitch ringing when its on. Are these issues related? Any fix?

Edit: Looking closer it looks like a grid of black lines, almost like every pixel is being separated. I haven't used a tube tv is years, is this normal? Maybe I am sitting too close.
Perfectly normal image. All CRTs have a gap between pixels. Being that you have a Trinitron, it uses an aperture grille which is a series of tiny wires, striped vertically behind the glass. This is what is creating the gap that you see. Additionally, traditional CRTs have gaps horizontally as well, so the Trinitron style is a bit more advanced and eliminates various image problems inherent with the system, like vertical moire. If you sit at a comfortable distance and just use/view the TV it should melt away. The pitch that you hear is normal too. Usually it will soften up after your TV has been turned on for a while.
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Old 11-10-2014, 09:53 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by LiquidSnake View Post
Perfectly normal image. All CRTs have a gap between pixels. Being that you have a Trinitron, it uses an aperture grille which is a series of tiny wires, striped vertically behind the glass. This is what is creating the gap that you see. Additionally, traditional CRTs have gaps horizontally as well, so the Trinitron style is a bit more advanced and eliminates various image problems inherent with the system, like vertical moire. If you sit at a comfortable distance and just use/view the TV it should melt away. The pitch that you hear is normal too. Usually it will soften up after your TV has been turned on for a while.
Thanks that makes sense. I don't understand why people prefer that type of image over the newer style TVs. With an s-video cable the image on my lcd looks fine and all the colors are solid.
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Old 11-10-2014, 10:23 AM
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Answers may vary, depending on who you ask, and on what they use their televisions for.

  • It gives a softer image than the razor sharp one, which hides some of the issues of a lower resolution signal.
  • It gives more accurate colours with a wider gamut (this one can vary though, depending on age & use, and a lot of these are very old now).
  • It gives less or even zero lag than digital televisions due to the signal type used as well as the tech of the tube scan.
  • The blank areas of the image help to provide a definition that is lacking from the lower resolution signal (similar but not same to the above).
  • Old television, video, and other broadcasts (games, etc.) were made to be displayed on these, and not the newer stuff (because it obviously didn't exist when the video was made) and so it appears more natural to old-timers who saw it first on these televisions.
A few of these are big deals to gamers especially.


You might not think the top image here is bad, and it does look fine, but it doesn't have the appearance of additional texture that the blank lines give it in the image below. People even go through pains in effort to recreate these on newer televisions, just to approximate that look.
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Old 11-11-2014, 11:19 AM
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And sorta to your last bullet point - they display SD and possibly ED content in the 'proper' resolution without [sometimes nasty] upconversion. Maybe the same with 720p (if they can do it 'natively') and 1080i?

On conversion, I've found that I prefer the stuff I record with my DVD and HDD/DVD recorders (s-video input max capability) played back at 480i rather than the 480p ("progressive") option (looks fuzzy).

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