The Official Kd-34xbr960 Thread - Page 271 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 6Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #8101 of 8188 Old 02-18-2014, 03:44 AM
 
somelogin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,072
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
I wonder if companies have to pay out damages if they say their stands hold x pounds and then they break. Walmart has one for only $59 which claims to support 240 pounds. lol
somelogin is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #8102 of 8188 Old 02-18-2014, 05:54 AM
 
somelogin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,072
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Btw, people on here, said CRTs have very bad contrast ratios. Why is that? If they really have great blacks, as people say, then how could the bright side of it be bad enough to have it end up with low ratios? I don't recall thinking a CRT was dull in the past. What do people like so much about the tv, other than black level alone and no input lag?
somelogin is offline  
post #8103 of 8188 Old 02-18-2014, 11:00 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Floydage's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 1,514
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked: 41
BTW there's a pic of the 960 on the optional matching stand in one of the lower thumbs:

http://www.crutchfield.com/S-m15ZTo2tVs1/p_158KD34XBR/Sony-KD-34XBR960.html

Dangerous to put one of these heavy beasts on a tall stand. And I suspect stand manufacturers put out a legal disclaimer with their stands.

Who said that? (bad contrast ratios). I thought it was the other way around.

Color, motion handling, and Super Fine Pitch tube (SFP "...refers to Sony's line of Trinitrons with high horizontal resolution and very fine aperture grille stripe pitch." - Wiki)

Floydage is offline  
post #8104 of 8188 Old 02-18-2014, 11:40 AM
Advanced Member
 
JA Fant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Prattville AL
Posts: 629
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 65 Post(s)
Liked: 68
I use a Bell'O 3 -glassed shelf stand that was purchased same day as my 960N almost 9 years ago. smile.gif
JA Fant is offline  
post #8105 of 8188 Old 02-18-2014, 12:01 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Floydage's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 1,514
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked: 41
I use one of those dark grey thick particle board stands, I think Hitachi. Label on it states good for a 36" TV which I'm assuming was a 4:3 CRT, so I think good enough (no wheels helps increase capacity limit). Not tall either but to be honest it seems about right for living room furniture and this size TV. Can't complain as I got both the stand and TV free from my friend's warehouse where he works.

Floydage is offline  
post #8106 of 8188 Old 02-18-2014, 03:46 PM
 
somelogin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,072
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Well, I've seen several stands for sale which claim they can hold 200 and even 240 pounds. And at least one specifically mentioned CRTs, although that was the one closer to $200, and the walmart one is only $59. I hate to keep paying more and more for a 34 inch tv made a decade ago, but I did like the 30HS420 and so very tempting to get tot ry one better than that one was.
somelogin is offline  
post #8107 of 8188 Old 02-18-2014, 08:45 PM
 
somelogin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,072
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Keep in mind I have two pioneer elite 111s (but both with seemingly bad black levels for some reason) and have tried a sony xbr929, panny st30 and st60, etc... so I am deciding if this tv is going to impress me or not, compared to those high end displays, not just comparing based on low cost. I was just telling someone I was thinking of buying this and she thinks it won't have a good picture and said the difference between her old CRT and an LED were night and day. But see her CRT was not HD. She describes CRT as blurry and not a good picture. This is going to cost several hundred if I get it because of the stand situation.... And I have no good place to PUT the tv in this small place I am at. But if it's good enough and big enough at only 34 inches for me to love it I would not care where I have to put it.
somelogin is offline  
post #8108 of 8188 Old 02-19-2014, 04:37 AM
 
somelogin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,072
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Also, did Sony ever make a 40 inch widescreen XBR CRT? I see they made a 40 inch xbr800 4:3.
somelogin is offline  
post #8109 of 8188 Old 02-19-2014, 05:01 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
DSperber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Marina Del Rey, CA, USA
Posts: 5,463
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 81 Post(s)
Liked: 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by somelogin View Post

Also, did Sony ever make a 40 inch widescreen XBR CRT? I see they made a 40 inch xbr800 4:3.
No.

Largest 16:9 CRT screen made by Sony was the 34XBR family. And the 960 was true flatscreen 16:9 CRT.

I believe the largest 16:9 CRT screen made was the 38" from RCA (F38310), but it was curved as the only way it could be made strong enough to avoid imploding from outside air pressure and the vacuum inside the tube.
DSperber is offline  
post #8110 of 8188 Old 02-19-2014, 09:28 AM
Senior Member
 
LiquidSnake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Miami, Florida
Posts: 320
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by somelogin View Post

Also, did Sony ever make a 40 inch widescreen XBR CRT? I see they made a 40 inch xbr800 4:3.

As DSperber mentioned, 16:9 Sony tubes were never made larger than 34". That's the bad news. The good news is that if you have one of the 40" XBR800, then you have a screen that is almost the same exact height as a 50" widescreen, and when used with 16:9 ratios it will provide an image that is 37" corner to corner, larger than the largest 16:9 CRT that was made.

There are of course downsides to this. You have to make the choice to switch between a 4:3 or 16:9 image (maybe based on the material you're viewing). And the tube is "only" a "HiScan," not the "Super Fine Pitch" tube type that has the highest, physically resolvable resolution possible. And you have to deal with a 300 pound television, one that two strong men can actually lift alone, but that is somewhat awkward to move if you don't know where to hold it when lifting. It can be tough just to convince someone who is strong enough to help you lift it for this reason. But still, a KV40-XBR800 (or a KV40-XBR700) is not at all a bad CRT to own and use in the modern age.
LiquidSnake is offline  
post #8111 of 8188 Old 02-19-2014, 11:26 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Floydage's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 1,514
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked: 41
I couldn't have said it better myself 'Snake. Here is a good reference:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FD_Trinitron/WEGA

Note that if you like 4:3 material a 36" is a nice compromise with 33" in 16:9 mode but weight closer to a 960; there's a lone SFP 4:3 at the top of the chart (KV-36XS955).

HDMI or DVI and ATSC tuners are other features to consider with the various models.

Floydage is offline  
post #8112 of 8188 Old 02-19-2014, 11:34 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Floydage's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 1,514
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSperber View Post

I believe the largest 16:9 CRT screen made was the 38" from RCA (F38310), but it was curved as the only way it could be made strong enough to avoid imploding from outside air pressure and the vacuum inside the tube.

Also the German Loewe 38" models which I've read on AVS used the same picture tube. I've seen a few of these on the cheap on craigslist here, one a really good condition one the lady dropped to $25 from $50 just to get the beast moved out.

Floydage is offline  
post #8113 of 8188 Old 02-19-2014, 04:36 PM
 
somelogin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,072
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Does anyone think I will be impressed by something with this model, even after using newer top models of most other types (CCFL LCD, LED, plasma)? I am assuming the black level will be better than my elites, especially since something is wrong with them, so I would think that is one big thing I would notice, but going all the way from 50 inches down to 34 is a big leap. I had thought well spending $200-$300 to get this and some stand would at least be good to have it as a backup tv because all tvs of current tech hurt my head for some odd reason and also the bigger the size the more it happens, so I figured maybe it's worth it to have this smaller one as a backup. But I don't want to get it and then never use it and this 200 pound tv be here with me unable to do anything with. Like I said, I did own the 30HS420, so I know "somewhat" what it will be like, but how much better, I don't know.
somelogin is offline  
post #8114 of 8188 Old 02-19-2014, 05:33 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
DSperber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Marina Del Rey, CA, USA
Posts: 5,463
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 81 Post(s)
Liked: 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by somelogin View Post

Does anyone think I will be impressed by something with this model, even after using newer top models of most other types (CCFL LCD, LED, plasma)? I am assuming the black level will be better than my elites, especially since something is wrong with them, so I would think that is one big thing I would notice, but going all the way from 50 inches down to 34 is a big leap. I had thought well spending $200-$300 to get this and some stand would at least be good to have it as a backup tv because all tvs of current tech hurt my head for some odd reason and also the bigger the size the more it happens, so I figured maybe it's worth it to have this smaller one as a backup. But I don't want to get it and then never use it and this 200 pound tv be here with me unable to do anything with. Like I said, I did own the 30HS420, so I know "somewhat" what it will be like, but how much better, I don't know.
I had previously thought my 34XBR960 was "reference" (definitely state of the art back in 2003 or so). Absolutely superior to my previous Sampo SME-34WHD5 (which had just died), which was itself also "reference" back in 2002 or so. Both of these were genuinely stunning to look at in HD (especially coming directly from 4:3 480i SD).

But to be honest, they are still analog CRT devices at their heart. Very much subject to setup and tweaking just for geometry/overscan and curvature/bowing issues (unique but common for 16x9 CRT tubes, especially true flatscreens), and definitely should receive a "calibration" treatment by a professional to deal as best as possible with the available service menu tweaks relating to color/hue as well as user menu tweaks relating to brightness/contrast and sharpness.

And even then, each rectangular shaped analog flatscreen CRT tube had its own unique "convergence" and "color purity" issues, potentially requiring a "magnet job" by a trained Sony-qualified technician as the only way to solve the unique problems of that unique picture tube. Some "horizontal" defects can be "cured" through service menu adjustments, but other "vertical" defects cannot.

So if you buy a used 960 (and one which is by now at least 10 years old and probably worse for the wear and tear), you really don't have any guarantee at all of what it is that you will be getting for your money, no matter how little it might cost.

As readers of this thread know, I long touted my 960 as "fantastic". Turns out color-wise I didn't really have it adjusted correctly at all, and it was VERY VERY BLUE (because I thought I liked the look of "cool" temperature). It wasn't until I had a true pro calibration by D-Nice last year that I finally saw what "correct color" looked like, and fell in love. And what I'd previously been looking at for the past 9 years was "embarrassing" by comparison.

But... in all honesty the picture from even a properly calibrated 960 vintage circa 2004 simply CANNOT COMPARE to the picture from a much larger modern technology high-end plasma (like my Panny 65VT50 acquired about 14 months ago and also pro-calibrated by D-Nice, so that color on my two calibrated sets IS NOW TRULY IDENTICAL). There is simply a much more dramatic image from a screen that's 4-times the size of the 960, producing much more "pop", brightness, contrast, sharpness, uniformity, linearity, purity, etc. I now NEVER watch my 960. There simply is nothing like the "3D-like realism and transparency" (words I used to use for my 960, but which really are now appropriate even more for my 65VT50) coming from the stunning HDTV and BluRay images coming out of the VT50. Couple that with running 720p/1080i HDTV source through the external HDMI input of my Oppo BDP-103 player (which processes and upconverts to 1080p for delivery to the VT50) and the resulting 1080p image onscreen is just amazing. Remember, the 960 does not accept 1080p, and this makes a big difference.

Sure, is it really fair to compare these two sets? What if you didn't want or couldn't house a set as large as 65", but were simply looking for a much smaller set in the 32"-37" size range for a secondary TV location? Should you consider the 200lb. CRT 960? You're going to need a pretty sturdy cabinet or A/V equipment credenza or TV table or something, to just hold the beast. Might you not be better off in the long run (not to mention providing more viewing enjoyment) to consider a modern 1080p-capable alternative? Even try to talk yourself (or partner/spouse) into going with a much larger screen than you thought you were wanting... say 42" or 50" or 55"?? Honestly, the larger the screen (but still appropriately sized for your viewing distance), the MUCH LARGER will be your viewing enjoyment, especially if you go with a high-end flatscreen and then have it pro-calibrated.

I'm not a gamer, and don't watch DVD's (not normally, anyway). I only watch 720p/1080i HDTV and BluRays. Going with my 65VT50 last year and then getting it (and my 960, even though I knew I'd probably never watch it again) calibrated by D-Nice is the best thing I've ever done. While there might be some advantage to using a 960 if you watch old 480i (which the 960 does VERY WELL), for modern HD/BluRay you really should go with a plasma (in my opinion) if you want stunning images with CRT-like blacks and and brilliant whites/colors along with 180-degree viewing angles (i.e. that have none of the "off-axis" family room viewing angle considerations so obvious with LCD/LED panels, although these have definitely improved).

And get a Panny plasma while you still can find them and buy them. They're no longer being made.
DSperber is offline  
post #8115 of 8188 Old 02-19-2014, 06:31 PM
 
somelogin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,072
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Like I said, a lot of unique complications come into play with me, though. For whatever reason ALL plasmas hurt my head. I assumed due to flicker. I have two pioneer elite 111fd sets I bought used and both have major black level issues, unless my eyes are somehow making me see something incorrectly. But anyway so those tvs hurt my head also, but Panasonic plasmas hurt it far worse than any other tv I've tried. And I've tried Samsung plasma, sony CCFL LCD, sony xbr led sets, multiple panny plasmas, multiple kuroelites, etc.... and nothing stops hurting my head, but plasmas are far worse.

Btw, I thought you measure tv size diagonally even for 4:3 sets, but that must not be true because I was at someone's house today who is using a 1999 CRT and it measured almost 38 inches diagonally and I know Sony didn't make a 38 inch set 15 years ago. You must measure 4:3 ones top to bottom or something.
somelogin is offline  
post #8116 of 8188 Old 02-20-2014, 06:40 AM
 
somelogin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,072
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Says online you do also measure CRTs diagonally, so I guess this person whose tv I saw has a 38 inch one.... I didn't remember Sony maiking one that size in 1999. And the person thought it was only 24 inches.
somelogin is offline  
post #8117 of 8188 Old 02-20-2014, 10:17 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Floydage's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 1,514
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by somelogin View Post

Like I said, I did own the 30HS420, so I know "somewhat" what it will be like, but how much better, I don't know.

I think it will look similar as you'd be increasing to 34" but with the SFP higher vertical resolution.

Like DSperber replied, you'd have some unique issues such as geometry with a CRT but it sounds like you should be all familiar with these. Sounds like you've had every kind of TV so...

With your visual condition it doesn't sound like you have any choice. And with a small room you don't want too big a TV anyway unless you enjoy actually seeing the pixels. But really the first thing I'll suggest is that you see a vision specialist, you may have a condition that can be corrected.

In general, all TV's are measured diagonally, even described this way in many ads.

Floydage is offline  
post #8118 of 8188 Old 02-20-2014, 05:46 PM
 
somelogin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,072
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
I have one vision issue which can be corrected with surgery, but my main vision issues can't be corrected. However, the ones which can't be corrected I have had all my life and these head issues only started in the past few years, so whether or not they are related to something which I can control, I don't know. Doctors say they've never heard of this type of thing. For instance, a lot of plasmas feel like they are SQUEEZING my head to where I feel like my brains are going to explode. lol The pioneer elites are much better on my head, for some reason, but still bother it quite a bit, just not the squeezing sensation.

But when I looked at this other person's 4:3 CRT, honestly I think it was bothering my head right off too. I don't think the HS420 ever did, so I don't know if this was due to this other one being too big, a 38 4:3 compared with my old 30 16:9, or if whatever head issues I have are just happening on most any tv. I know CRTs can have bad flicker too, but I never noticed any issues with that 30 inch one.

So who knows. Maybe I should have kept the Epson projector I tried. That didn't give me any head problem, but I was annoyed by the blacks not being dark enough and it was too hard to position the projector anywhere ideal.
somelogin is offline  
post #8119 of 8188 Old 02-21-2014, 09:31 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Floydage's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 1,514
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Of course being too close to a CRT can cause problems, and that closeness will be somewhat proportional to screen size.
I don't know if resolution would make a difference but maybe the type of scan (480p vs. 480i&1080i).

Floydage is offline  
post #8120 of 8188 Old 02-21-2014, 11:44 PM
 
somelogin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,072
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
I know on the 30 inch, watching mostly 1080i, I never recall having it give me headaches and I was literally one foot from it.
somelogin is offline  
post #8121 of 8188 Old 02-22-2014, 10:32 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Floydage's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 1,514
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Well enjoy the x-rays, that's way too close for a CRT. I sometimes get too close to my CRT PC monitor doing some aggressive typing and I pay for it later with some kind of eyestrain headache.

Floydage is offline  
post #8122 of 8188 Old 02-25-2014, 01:50 AM
Member
 
First XBR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 26
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Can someone shoot me some picture settings that are ideal for a dark den. I have it set to pro, monitor & have it set to warm. I bought this tv a couple of months ago. I can't afford the new plasma's, so this is what I have, I'm enjoying it very much.
First XBR is offline  
post #8123 of 8188 Old 03-16-2014, 11:04 PM
Newbie
 
9604me's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10

  Just recently started looking for a 960N...I have a 970 that I bought new back when they(960's,970's) were last sold.  Of course I wanted the 960, but none were available at the time, all crt's were disappearing from stores, so i settled for the 970....I've used it pretty much EVERY day for prolly ~9 yrs now.  I love it, and am afraid of it dying....More so since I got into the service menu and started ignorantly messing around...BUT I STILL WANT A 960 DAMMIT!  Of course, can't find any local.  Found one one CL that was like a five hour drive...Guy had it(960N in properly working order) in the for sale section for $40.  I contacted him, then the #%$@ refuses to sell it to me and says he decided to have E-cycling pick it up.  Just recently found one much closer(~3hr drive one way) but it is not the "N" model.

  Questions for the experts...

  #1:  Is there ANY difference between the N and non models besides the film on the screen on the nons?

  #2  Do Comcrap or other cable companies still offer cable card service?  I'd love to use this as a tv, and not a "monitor" like you have to with a settop box.

  #3  If I ever get in the presence of one for sale, what do I easily check to ~determine functional condition?  Make sure still a good pic at reasonable brightness/picture settings?  (Like make sure brightness doesn't have to be jacked up for a reasonable picture, etc.)

 

  Any help is appreciated, I came across this site/thread whilst researching my renewing interest in the ...960.

9604me is offline  
post #8124 of 8188 Old 03-17-2014, 12:25 AM
Member
 
First XBR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 26
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 11
I live in the 92505 area & there is always a couple of them for sale. When I move to Houston in a couple of months, I plan on settling in then find some way of hauling it out there. Good luck finding one, let me know if I can help.
First XBR is offline  
post #8125 of 8188 Old 03-18-2014, 01:06 PM
Senior Member
 
LiquidSnake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Miami, Florida
Posts: 320
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 15
#1. There is NO difference between the N and non-N models other than the anti-glare film. From what I have read, you are probably better off with a non-N. A lot of people wind up removing the film from their N models.
#2. All the cable companies use cable cards. They are provided at a much lower fee than the cable boxes. However, you will not be able to do VOD and some other niceties that you can with a cable box (or even a TiVo or such.)
#3. The worst thing that can happen with a tube is the tube itself being shot. There's not really a great way to test for that, either. If you can determine a number of hours used that helps a great deal, but this kind of information isn't always available even in service menus, as different televisions have different firmware. A lot of CRTs don't track it at all. Most every other factor is fixable, but different ones can be long-shots for you depending on your skill or ability to find a technician. Just view it for a bit, inspect its condition, note how thick the dust layers are (lick your finger and run it along the back, see what level of furry you pull back), and just go by your gut I spose. Almost anything used this old is a crapshoot.
LiquidSnake is offline  
post #8126 of 8188 Old 03-18-2014, 02:40 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Floydage's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 1,514
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Most of the ones I've seen on Craigslist in my area have been non-N models. I believe the Ns were later so it could be the flat panel and other competition ate into N sales.

Floydage is offline  
post #8127 of 8188 Old 03-24-2014, 04:30 PM
Member
 
BaronKatz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidSnake View Post

#1. There is NO difference between the N and non-N models other than the anti-glare film..

I have a Non-N model and it has some sort of anti-glare film on it. It has almost a purple hue when the TV is off and you get light on it. Also I heard that the early Non-N's were made in the USA and for the N's they shifted production to Mexico. Is this true or were they always made in Mexico?

I recently acquired my TV and I have a few issues if anyone can help me figure this out:

When I play Blu-Rays (through component or HDMI) the image looks crisp, sharp, and with decent color and contrast (although not nearly as good color/contrast vividness as my Loewe Aconda). However, when I watch Comcast through either Component or HDMI it looks a bit washed out and a bit pixelated for the HD channels and the SD channels are super pixelated. It's the same story with Netflix from my set top box, it looks so pixelated and washed out as well.

I've tried all these through the same input, so the input settings shouldn't have changed (IE all through the same Component or same HDMI input) and with various settings. The best was the Pro Setting since it removes the edge sharpening and some other things that make it look more pixelated and grainy. The Vivid just made it looks REALLY grainy and pixelated, although it has decent brightness where the Pro is just way too dark... I haven't looked into the service menu and don't know if maybe there are settings that need to be turned on or off? Or what needs to be done.

Anyone else had this problem when watching anything but Bluray discs on their XBR960s?
BaronKatz is offline  
post #8128 of 8188 Old 03-25-2014, 10:54 AM
Senior Member
 
LiquidSnake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Miami, Florida
Posts: 320
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 15
As floyd mentioned in another thread, it looks like the N-models are the ones without the film, sorry for my gaff. Still, a lot of folks who have the film tend to remove it. It can get dingy with time, use, perhaps in a smoker's home, etc. it starts to get dirty and crappy looking. I also see a great deal of tell about how the film helps give a proper colour image so it looks "wrong" somehow with it off, but I doubt this is anything like a real issue. Certainly non-fixable as there is nothing to honestly distinguish the filmless models from the film-covered ones, just tweak your settings and you're good.

If I were you I would look long and hard at your source. It sounds like this is where your issue is. You say your BluRays look crisp because they are "HD," but everything else "HD and SD" looks pixelated. Well, are you certain the resolution your cable box is set at? Make absolutely sure that your cable box is set to 1080i or 720p and not 480p. (Or 480i!) Some cable boxes up the res on SD channels, make sure that this is turned on for your cable box and it should improve the look of the SD channels... a bit, it won't work miracles but it shouldn't gouge your eyes out with pixelation. Try other devices that you know are set to 720p or 1080i and compare. Got an antenna handy? Does the 960 have an ATSC tuner?
LiquidSnake is offline  
post #8129 of 8188 Old 03-25-2014, 12:51 PM
Member
 
BaronKatz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidSnake View Post

As floyd mentioned in another thread, it looks like the N-models are the ones without the film, sorry for my gaff. Still, a lot of folks who have the film tend to remove it. It can get dingy with time, use, perhaps in a smoker's home, etc. it starts to get dirty and crappy looking. I also see a great deal of tell about how the film helps give a proper colour image so it looks "wrong" somehow with it off, but I doubt this is anything like a real issue. Certainly non-fixable as there is nothing to honestly distinguish the filmless models from the film-covered ones, just tweak your settings and you're good.

If I were you I would look long and hard at your source. It sounds like this is where your issue is. You say your BluRays look crisp because they are "HD," but everything else "HD and SD" looks pixelated. Well, are you certain the resolution your cable box is set at? Make absolutely sure that your cable box is set to 1080i or 720p and not 480p. (Or 480i!) Some cable boxes up the res on SD channels, make sure that this is turned on for your cable box and it should improve the look of the SD channels... a bit, it won't work miracles but it shouldn't gouge your eyes out with pixelation. Try other devices that you know are set to 720p or 1080i and compare. Got an antenna handy? Does the 960 have an ATSC tuner?

After playing the Bluray, the TV shows up fine now on the HD channels. No more pixelization. It's almost as if it was dowconverting to SD before. It's still quite washed out compared to the Bluray, but maybe this is something I can fix in the service menu, or perhaps since I can't afford an ISF calibration - through one of those DVD's where I set the colors up... The NTSC standard setting is horrible, it makes anything white look cream colored, you cannot get a white color at all in Warm (NTSC Standard), it seems like Pro is the only decent setting...

And when playing SD channels it still pixelates a little, when playing Netflix, it really pixelates badly unless it's Full HD, which unfortunately I never get from my Set-Top box for Netflix. They only do Full HD on certain Blu-ray players and set-top boxes and with certain broadband providers (Comcast not being one of them for some reason) and they call it Super HD. Otherwise everything is 480 or 720... It wasn't as pixelated on the Loewe Aconda but the upconversion and filters on it were much better. Besides the build and looks, what sets B&O and Loewe apart are the video processors (since they essentially use other companies tubes or panels yet make the picture look completely different). These processors, electronics, and engineering, is about half the price of the TV. The Beovision Avant Video processor units is what made them look almost 3D and cost half the price of the TV from what I've seen...
BaronKatz is offline  
post #8130 of 8188 Old 03-26-2014, 09:07 AM
Senior Member
 
LiquidSnake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Miami, Florida
Posts: 320
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 15
I'm confused, why would the TV play HD television channels fine now, after playing a BluRay? What changed? Rather, what did you do differently?
LiquidSnake is offline  
Reply Direct View (single tube) CRT Displays



Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off