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post #8731 of 8747 Old 07-28-2014, 08:47 AM
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UPDATE: Epson really came through for me. They are shipping a new 8350 to make amends for shipping 3 DOA refurbs in a row. That's top notch customer service. Assuming they keep spitting out good products (hopefully something new at CEDIA) then I'm a loyal customer.

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post #8732 of 8747 Old 07-28-2014, 01:32 PM
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Let me summarize... you'd been using your 8350 for over 2 years and all was well, correct? Then, your HDMI input board went haywire and Epson did a 1-time courtesy which took 3 refurbed units all of which had their own issues and now are exchanging their 3rd refurb for a brand new 8350, is that right?

So you'll be getting a 'new lease on life' having a brand new one! Those Epson folks really go the extra mile to do right by their customers. Congrats!
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post #8733 of 8747 Old 07-31-2014, 05:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Hornfeck View Post
Let me summarize... you'd been using your 8350 for over 2 years and all was well, correct? Then, your HDMI input board went haywire and Epson did a 1-time courtesy which took 3 refurbed units all of which had their own issues and now are exchanging their 3rd refurb for a brand new 8350, is that right?

So you'll be getting a 'new lease on life' having a brand new one! Those Epson folks really go the extra mile to do right by their customers. Congrats!
Yep -- that's exactly what happened! I never thought I'd wear out the screws on my ceiling mount hardware until these last two months!

I am going to sheepishly ask their tech support if there is a new 2-year warranty on this model. My assumption is yes, but I don't want to be greedy after they went above and beyond. 4 years of coverage would be amazing. That would take me until 4K projectors and reasonable, and 4K content is plentiful!

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post #8734 of 8747 Old 08-02-2014, 10:19 AM
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anybody here replace their own lamp bulbs on the 8350? I have been trying some of the knockoff lamps but for every one that has good quality it seems 4-5 dont. I have a spare lamp enclosure and would like to get a high quality bulb to install and see if that is a better(and cheaper) option. Better option than the knockoffs and cheaper than a OEM. Our projector literally stays on from 8 in the am till 9-10 at night. Id appreciate any help finding a good source for quality bulbs that I could replace myself.
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post #8735 of 8747 Old 08-03-2014, 08:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diat150 View Post
anybody here replace their own lamp bulbs on the 8350? I have been trying some of the knockoff lamps but for every one that has good quality it seems 4-5 dont. I have a spare lamp enclosure and would like to get a high quality bulb to install and see if that is a better(and cheaper) option. Better option than the knockoffs and cheaper than a OEM. Our projector literally stays on from 8 in the am till 9-10 at night. Id appreciate any help finding a good source for quality bulbs that I could replace myself.
Who Makes Projector Lamps?

High quality projector lamps that meet industry standards are only made by a few projector lamp manufacturers in the world. Manufacturing projector lamps is an incredibly expensive and challenging technological process that only a few companies are able to meet.

The major manufacturers in the projector lamp industry are -

Philips - The pioneer of the projector lamp world. In 1995 they began researching and developing the first metal halide lamps. They eventually developed a mercury vapor projector lamp, which they called a UHP lamp or ultra-high pressure mercury vapor. The new development made it possible for projection systems to emit a brightness never before seen, and made digital projectors possible. Philips remains a dominant force in the projector lamp industry, and some estimates indicate Philips has more than 70% control over the projector lamp manufacturing and sales market today worldwide.

Ushio - Founded in Japan, but now with offices around the world, Ushio manufactures hundreds of different industrial lights, lamps and bulbs. The company started in 1964 as an industrial light manufacturer. Ushio manufactures projector lamps for Sony, Sanyo, BenQ, and many other companies. Estimates indicate they have a 10% share in the projector lamp market.

Osram - Osram started in Germany. The company specializes in producing the ARC tube in mercury vapor lamps and metal halide lamps. Osram claims to be the second largest lighting manufacturer in the world, with about a 7% market share.

The Others - There’s a handful of projector lamp manufacturers in Taiwan, Japan, and China. The most notable is Matsushita, which is a subsidiary of Epson and manufacturers all of Epson's lamps. Most smaller manufacturers of projector lamps don’t produce high quality lamps and aren’t commonly found in new projectors.

Why Are Projector Lamps So Expensive?

There is a good reason for the high cost of a new projector lamp. Compressed inside the ARC tube of the projector lamp is an ultra-high pressurize mercury vapor which is ignited when electricity jumps or arcs, across the gap filled with this gas. The ignition of the gas is what produces a projector lamp's extreme bright light.

Thus, the technology and engineering that goes into making a projector lamp is not cheap. In fact, the machines required to produce a single projector lamp can cost the manufacturer millions of dollars.

In addition to the cost of the machinery, manufacturers also have to hire expert scientists and engineers that can ensure that the projector lamp meets the standards required by your projector. The mercury vapor must be precisely pressurized and the ARC tube and quartz reflector must be exactly positioned at the correct angle. If any of these elements are not calibrated exactly as they need to be, the projector lamp may not produce the brightness expected, may burn the LCD panel within the projector, or could fail to ignite.

Every projector lamp has different ignition and running voltages and wattages. These configurations produce different brightness levels (ANSI lumens rates). Therefore, machines that manufacture projector lamps are complex and expensive to maintain. They have to be recalibrated for each specific new lamp setting. There’s no short way around this process if the manufacturer wants to produce a high quality projector lamp.

Projector lamps are cost intensive to make and that is why there are only four/ five major manufacturers of high-quality, ORIGINAL projector lamps in the entire world. These manufacturers have spent a lot of money both researching and developing projector lamps. They also have to maintain the assembly plants where the lamps are made. The costs to develop and make projector lamps limits competition in the market, but both of these factors increase the cost of projector lamps.

Basically you get what you pay for. If you are intent on using bare bulbs make sure they are manufactured by the companies mentioned.

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post #8736 of 8747 Old 08-04-2014, 06:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr.G View Post
Who Makes Projector Lamps?

High quality projector lamps that meet industry standards are only made by a few projector lamp manufacturers in the world. Manufacturing projector lamps is an incredibly expensive and challenging technological process that only a few companies are able to meet.

The major manufacturers in the projector lamp industry are -

Philips - The pioneer of the projector lamp world. In 1995 they began researching and developing the first metal halide lamps. They eventually developed a mercury vapor projector lamp, which they called a UHP lamp or ultra-high pressure mercury vapor. The new development made it possible for projection systems to emit a brightness never before seen, and made digital projectors possible. Philips remains a dominant force in the projector lamp industry, and some estimates indicate Philips has more than 70% control over the projector lamp manufacturing and sales market today worldwide.

Ushio - Founded in Japan, but now with offices around the world, Ushio manufactures hundreds of different industrial lights, lamps and bulbs. The company started in 1964 as an industrial light manufacturer. Ushio manufactures projector lamps for Sony, Sanyo, BenQ, and many other companies. Estimates indicate they have a 10% share in the projector lamp market.

Osram - Osram started in Germany. The company specializes in producing the ARC tube in mercury vapor lamps and metal halide lamps. Osram claims to be the second largest lighting manufacturer in the world, with about a 7% market share.

The Others - There’s a handful of projector lamp manufacturers in Taiwan, Japan, and China. The most notable is Matsushita, which is a subsidiary of Epson and manufacturers all of Epson's lamps. Most smaller manufacturers of projector lamps don’t produce high quality lamps and aren’t commonly found in new projectors.

Why Are Projector Lamps So Expensive?

There is a good reason for the high cost of a new projector lamp. Compressed inside the ARC tube of the projector lamp is an ultra-high pressurize mercury vapor which is ignited when electricity jumps or arcs, across the gap filled with this gas. The ignition of the gas is what produces a projector lamp's extreme bright light.

Thus, the technology and engineering that goes into making a projector lamp is not cheap. In fact, the machines required to produce a single projector lamp can cost the manufacturer millions of dollars.

In addition to the cost of the machinery, manufacturers also have to hire expert scientists and engineers that can ensure that the projector lamp meets the standards required by your projector. The mercury vapor must be precisely pressurized and the ARC tube and quartz reflector must be exactly positioned at the correct angle. If any of these elements are not calibrated exactly as they need to be, the projector lamp may not produce the brightness expected, may burn the LCD panel within the projector, or could fail to ignite.

Every projector lamp has different ignition and running voltages and wattages. These configurations produce different brightness levels (ANSI lumens rates). Therefore, machines that manufacture projector lamps are complex and expensive to maintain. They have to be recalibrated for each specific new lamp setting. There’s no short way around this process if the manufacturer wants to produce a high quality projector lamp.

Projector lamps are cost intensive to make and that is why there are only four/ five major manufacturers of high-quality, ORIGINAL projector lamps in the entire world. These manufacturers have spent a lot of money both researching and developing projector lamps. They also have to maintain the assembly plants where the lamps are made. The costs to develop and make projector lamps limits competition in the market, but both of these factors increase the cost of projector lamps.

Basically you get what you pay for. If you are intent on using bare bulbs make sure they are manufactured by the companies mentioned.
yes, I understand the process behind the bulbs and all that. I was hoping that someone was doing the same thing and could point me to a source for quality bulbs.
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post #8737 of 8747 Old 08-05-2014, 10:16 AM
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yes, I understand the process behind the bulbs and all that. I was hoping that someone was doing the same thing and could point me to a source for quality bulbs.
Bare bulbs are almost always counterfeit, so no they won't be quality bulbs. You don't mention your budget. What have you been spending on generic bulbs? $50, $100, $150? Have they been bare bulbs or generic lamp modules?

Regardless, your experience with 1 out 5 being decent is pretty indicative of the generic/counterfeit bulb market.

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post #8738 of 8747 Old 08-05-2014, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr.G View Post
Bare bulbs are almost always counterfeit, so no they won't be quality bulbs. You don't mention your budget. What have you been spending on generic bulbs? $50, $100, $150? Have they been bare bulbs or generic lamp modules?

Regardless, your experience with 1 out 5 being decent is pretty indicative of the generic/counterfeit bulb market.
so it sounds like I cant buy a bare osram bulb for the 8350? Is that what you are saying?
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post #8739 of 8747 Old 08-06-2014, 09:46 AM
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so it sounds like I cant buy a bare osram bulb for the 8350? Is that what you are saying?
Nothing is impossible, so you may find a bare bulb Osram out there somewhere. You'd have a much easier time finding one already installed in a generic/clone lamp module. You may have to resign yourself to doing what you've done in the past to save money and hope for the best.

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post #8740 of 8747 Old 08-10-2014, 04:58 PM - Thread Starter
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Crazy thing.....Replacement Lamps sell for under $60.00 (Prime) on Amazon w/150 day Warranty (Electrified)

Yet you can buy a so called "OEM" Lamp for $180.00+ and it only comes with a 30 day Warranty.

So I'd buy 3 @ $60.00 and just settle back.....

To quote James T. Kirk;
"I'm laughing at the superior intellect"
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post #8741 of 8747 Old 08-18-2014, 07:38 PM
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guess i should chime in about the dust blobs also. I got 3 at about the 600 hour mark. Didnt really bother me much since 2 were very tiny and 1 the size if a tennis ball. they were a faint green and can only be seen during black screens.

im now at 1800 mark and the bulb is started to get a little dull. dull enough for me to notice it. gonna buy a replacement bulb now.

By the way. I remember seeing someone posting pics of them opening and cleaning the blobs out with air. can anyone plese point me the the thread? Or if its on THIS thread someone please tell me what page?

Thanks
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post #8742 of 8747 Old 08-19-2014, 05:32 AM
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I am real close to pulling the trigger on the Epson 8345 (which from what I’ve read is the same as the 8350). Amazon and the Epson store have the 8345 for the same price right now. Should it matter where I purchase it from?

Also, if I purchase at Amazon I can get a 4-year Squaretrade warranty for around $85. Would that be worth the money?

Just wondering what everyone thinks. Thanks!
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post #8743 of 8747 Old 08-19-2014, 11:24 PM
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I am real close to pulling the trigger on the Epson 8345 (which from what I’ve read is the same as the 8350). Amazon and the Epson store have the 8345 for the same price right now. Should it matter where I purchase it from?

Also, if I purchase at Amazon I can get a 4-year Squaretrade warranty for around $85. Would that be worth the money?

Just wondering what everyone thinks. Thanks!

I had the 8345 (sold by Futureshop in Canada) and then returned it and got an 8350 from Visions when they had a sale. I only had it a few days, but I swear the 8350 gave me better black levels.

The prices are virtually the same - is there a certain reason you're considering the 8345 vs the 8350?
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post #8744 of 8747 Old 08-20-2014, 12:55 AM
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After using and testing both projectors for the better part of a month, I've come to the conclusion that the 8350 and 8345 are indeed the same projector with a few adjustments that mostly favor the 8345. Both projectors use exactly the same LCD panels and the same lamps.
The weaknesses of the 8350 have always been fast bulb burnouts (a problem shared with the 8100) and Dynamic Iris issues. These weaknesses seem to have been addressed with the 8345.
Upon checking the lumen numbers on both projectors using the same lamp, I found that all of the lumen numbers were essentially the same except in dynamic mode, where the 8350 was about 110 lumens brighter. (1450 lumens for the 8345, 1560 lumens for the 8350) I'm thinking this brightness setting was adjusted to prevent premature lamp burnouts.
When I put up the ANSI checkerboard pattern to measure contrast, both projectors, with the Dynamic iris turned off, measured the same at just over 800:1. With the dynamic iris set to auto the 8345 jumped up to 1100:1 while the 8350 surpassed 1300:1. My conclusion here is that an adjustment was made to address the over aggressive Dynamic Iris of the 8350 at the cost of some contrast.
In my case, I've been blessed with getting an 8350 with excellent convergence and no Dynamic Iris failures. Though i still have to contend with the lamps dimming rather quickly and burning out.
If i were to buy all over again, even with the slightly lowered contrast, I would buy the 8345 because it's the same great projector as the 8350 with slightly lower dynamic iris contrast, and more of the kinks of the 8350 worked out of it. At least i hope they are.
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post #8745 of 8747 Old 08-20-2014, 04:37 AM
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I had the 8345 (sold by Futureshop in Canada) and then returned it and got an 8350 from Visions when they had a sale. I only had it a few days, but I swear the 8350 gave me better black levels.

The prices are virtually the same - is there a certain reason you're considering the 8345 vs the 8350?
Price is actually one reason. I can get the 8345 for about $200 less. Which isn't THAT much savings but with all the other costs associated with finishing my basement every little bit helps. I'm not super picky about black levels and shadow detail. Since this is my first projector I'm more concerned with getting the best bang for my buck to make sure front projection is for me.

The main reason is that I'm hoping that they did work some of the kinks out of the 8350 when they rolled out the 8345. Since I'm not super picky on black levels I don't think I'm going to be able to tell the difference between the 8350 and 8345. But everything I've found says they are practically the same projector...

I should note that I did own the 8350 for a few weeks last year. I bought it from amazon for a really good price, but my basement finishing was not progressing fast enough (totally my own fault) so I returned the 8350 because I didn't want to use up the warranty while it sat in a box.
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post #8746 of 8747 Old 08-22-2014, 04:33 PM
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I have a 9350 which was upgraded from an 8350 after about #6 replacement. I'm headed for replacement #9 I think or third 9350 for various issues in no specific order: several dust blobs, DOA zoom ring, DOA auto iris, auto iris failure, eco mode flickering and plenty more dust blob issues in the middle that I didn't even send back until permanent failures occurred.

I digress. So, I'm at a point where Epson is mulling refunding my money or some other options. When the PJ works, it really is a great machine. I really enjoy the lens shift.

My question is, if offered a refund, what would a suitable more reliable alternative be. I would consider DLP now as I hear the higher speed color wheels mostly eliminate the rainbow? I would be looking in the $1200 range and would consider a few hundred more if it made a difference. I would want to avoid 3d as I hear it messes with latency for gaming?

Alternatively, any other options that makes sense such as asking for a different Epson projector etc.

I just feel like I'm playing russian roulette with these things and frankly, Epson has gone above and beyond and at this point is helping me well outside of the original warranty period. I would say they are going above and beyond but because of the issues I have had... I think it is a wash.

Sorry to crap on the 8350 in the owners thread but I am an owner
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post #8747 of 8747 Old 08-24-2014, 03:09 PM
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I went through 3 official bulbs in 2 years so I bought a third party one on amazon for $40 to try it out. Works fine but now I'm getting a flicker line near the top or bottom third. It's random but it's annoying. Is this bulb related?
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