Projector LCD panels - how do they do it? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 5 Old 03-16-2012, 09:22 AM - Thread Starter
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I was just thinking - how do they pack so many pixels into tiny LCD panels inside projector units?

Remember when the iPhone 4 came out? There was all that hoopla about the 3.5" screen with 960x640 resolution having a pixel density of over 300 ppi. Then there are all the 1080p flat panel displays, which all look awesome from several feet away, but the pixel density of those is quite low, usually in the 40-60 ppi range. The pixels are obviously quite visible if you get up close to the display.

So if the iPhone's "retina" display seemed so groundbreaking, how do they pack 1920x1080 pixels into the LCD panels that are less than 1 inch wide? And as they've been doing this ever since 1080p LCD projectors have been available, why was the iPhone 4's retina display regarding as "groundbreaking"?
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post #2 of 5 Old 12-15-2013, 05:03 AM
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I have been wondering the exact same thing. It is definitely astounding that the common 1920x1080p projector can fit that many pixels into a panel thats approx. 1 inch in size, as that would equal 2200ppi! I know what you mean, Apple's proud 326ppi doesn't seem so impressive anymore! The only explanation I can think of is that most LCD projectors use 3LCD, which are basically 3x 8bit (monochrome) panels, which each have one RGB colour split between them that is then combined to create the full colour image. Perhaps its is a lot easier to create super high ppi panels that are monochrome? Think about it, for an iPhone LCD there needs to be three sub-pixels crammed into every pixel, but for a 3LCD projector there only needs to be one. This is only my speculation (as my many google searches found me nothing), but its the only explanation I could think of. If you find an answer let me know!
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post #3 of 5 Old 12-22-2013, 09:04 PM
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I'm not in the business so I have no idea really other than speculation. However, if they can pack 24 million pixels or even 36 million pixels on a wafer with each pixel having an individual lens on a 36mm x 24mm sensor then I don't think putting 1080 liquid crystals on a LCD panel wouldn't be as much of a problem.

There might be a site that will explain what you're looking for.
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post #4 of 5 Old 12-23-2013, 07:52 AM
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The cost of the panels is probably much higher than the of the iPhone display, even though they are physically smaller. On a new iPhone, huge markup aside, only a small percentage of the price goes towards the LCD, whereas on a $2000 projector a huge amount (say 20-40%) of that can be just the panels and driving circuitry.
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post #5 of 5 Old 12-23-2013, 09:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickGSR94 View Post

I was just thinking - how do they pack so many pixels into tiny LCD panels inside projector units?




So if the iPhone's "retina" display seemed so groundbreaking, how do they pack 1920x1080 pixels into the LCD panels that are less thaAnd as they've been doing this ever since 1080p LCD projectors have been available, why was the iPhone 4's retina display regarding as "groundbreaking"?

Even more amazing is how they put 1920x1088 micro mirrors that have 1024 positions from full light reflected to no light reflected packed on a .65 chip. Then these things flip up and down to produce a black and white image with white light reflected off of them. Next they add a spinning multicolored wheel in line with the white light and sync all those billions of tiny flipping mirrors so the color of the wheel is correct a the moment one tiny part of an image needs color. now think about a full color frame (one still image) how do they get all those colors at one time? Now make it a moving image.. my brain wants to explode!

Each pixel in LCD can be any color all by itself with no other help.. seems a lot simpler and easy to do compared to a DLP chip doesn't it?

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/dlp2.htm
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