Best DLP black levels? - Page 2 - AVS Forum
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Digital Projectors - Under $3,000 USD MSRP > Best DLP black levels?
coderguy's Avatar coderguy 03:00 PM 03-29-2012
Thanks for the input, a couple points...

ANSI contrast isn't very reliable because it mostly affects blown out scenes and most of our rooms (other than true pitch black man-caves) cannot even achieve the ANSI rating in the room high enough to take advantage of the full ANSI of a projector. I own both a DLP and the JVC, I watch them back-to-back all the time, other than the pixel fill of DLP adding a sharpening effect (more so in animated content), the images look almost the same in bright scenes. Some super expensive DLP's do look better in bright scenes, but I'm not convinced it's due to the tech so much as it is more just the processing of the image. DLP's can and do tend to process sources cleaner in some cases, but again it's more of a Sony and JVC vs. specific DLP model then it is an LCOS vs. DLP thing, keeping in mind we only have a couple major players in the LCOS market. We sometimes forget that each projector has specific attributes and strengths beyond just tech differences.

I am speaking of reference level 35mm showings that look clean and smooth and since it is analog you don't see pixels. I define the film-look as the inability to see DIGITAL side effects of the pixel fill ratio, hence looking more analog (forget about any 35mm film noise for a moment). This is what E-SHIFT on the RS-55 gives us. 1080p is high enough resolution for the most part, but a higher resolution will result in even more invisible pixels, so it will still benefit some. It is incremental and depends on seating distance. Very good 35mm projectors showing a clean and new print of a reference 35mm level film do not have the dirty and grainy look. Movie theaters are all over the place in quality with 35mm, so it's hard to equate the film-look with the lower standards some use. It's just most older movie theaters that are still showing with 35mm projectors use the reel too many times and they don't maintain the equipment correctly. I know they don't use reels much anymore, but I'm talking the old days with the reference prints. Plus now it is almost all digital (cameras are digital they film with and movie theaters use digital projectors more often).

Sharpness can still be an issue if the convergence off enough or if you sit stupidly close to the screen, but I am just saying that with the JVC's the convergence has been so good on all the recent ones I've seen, including the one I own, that you probably have a really good chance of it NOT being an issue. The Epson has good convergence on most units, but not quite as reliable as JVC's sharpness.

mobius's Avatar mobius 09:00 PM 03-31-2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by PLB View Post

Resolution I think is no longer relevant. 1080 is good enough for human beings. Coderguy is telling us that sharpness too is no longer relevant. That's good to know.


Have you seen 4K or QFHD content?
Frosteh's Avatar Frosteh 02:41 AM 04-01-2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by mobius View Post

Have you seen 4K or QFHD content?

That's not the point. While 4k is obviously better, 1080p is still plenty, especially at the screen sizes and seating distances most people are using. Only those with a trained eye would be able to tell 4k from 1080p. In motion, such as a movie, the resolution becomes even less of an issue.
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