Optoma TH1060P - 4500 lumens - Why is there such little buzz? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 17 Old 05-26-2012, 08:57 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I am a lumens junkie. I currently own a Viewsonic Pro8200, and a 120 inch wide Da-Lite 2.8 High Power Cinemascope. After this amazing setup, I realized my affinity for pop was the number one thing I appreciated about a projector.

The Optoma TH1060P has 4500 lumens, 1080p, and an excellent suite of features. My question is- why is no one talking about it? I can't seem to find a single home theater review on it.


Any owners out there using this beast for home theater?
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post #2 of 17 Old 05-26-2012, 09:08 PM
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There is a review on ProjectorCentral.com comparing the Benq sh910 to the Optoma th1060.

The reason there isn't as much buzz on these for Home Theater is when DLP's have such high brightness, they have less contrast. Your Viewsonic would punch out a higher contrast image even though it is not as bright. Also, these super bright projectors generally have 3x color wheels, and maybe even 2x (probably 3x). So RBE is going to be a factor for more than the average DLP.

The Viewsonic has a 7seg-4x color wheel which is about the equivalent of a 5x or 6x color wheel, so the amount of RBE on the VS would be tremendously less than these projectors for anyone even semi-RBE sensitive.


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post #3 of 17 Old 05-26-2012, 09:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
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The contrast issues were my main concern. Hence, I am looking forward to a "true" Home Theater review of the unit. If I am serious about going 200 inches at 40 ft/L with a decent picture, I have to weigh in my options.
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post #4 of 17 Old 05-27-2012, 01:25 AM
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Anyone know does this pj compatible & support 1080p/24 ?
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post #5 of 17 Old 07-16-2012, 07:58 AM
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I got an Optoma TH1060P recently and it rocks. Using it in an outdoor patio area which is only partially light controlled, on a Draper 106" diagonal contrast gray screen. Will soon be setting it up also for us in our family room.

The brightness is fantastic and the blacks are plenty black. I have in the living room a HLSamsung HLT6187SAX 61" 1080P LED-DLP TV with 10,000:1 contrast ration and I can not see any difference in the blacks over the Optoma. After watching movies on the Optoma on that huge screen it is now almost hard to enjoy the Samsung any more.

The concerns on black levels are IMHO totally overrated, and the brightness of this unit, in environments that are not totally light controllable is a HUGE plus. Out back we are able to watch even at dusk before its full dark, and even with some ambient lights on while dark, it is almost like being in an actual movie theater.

This thing also has ALOT more inputs and outputs than Optoma's "Home theater" marketed units (HD23, etc) as well.

Yes, it is 1080P AND it accepts 24P content as well.
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post #6 of 17 Old 07-16-2012, 08:11 AM
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Hi SeaVee29, congratulation for your new pj, thanks for your review, it would be very much appreciated if you could sharing some screenshots of the TH1060P under ambient light situation
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post #7 of 17 Old 07-24-2012, 07:06 PM
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Ok, here are some pictures of the screen in my family room here in Miami Florida. The time of day was +/- 6:45PM and sunset was at 8:11PM per NOAA.

I took these yesterday using Pirates of the Caribbean Blu-Ray.

The room is long and narrow, about 24' long X 10' wide. Just to the right of screen you can see the partially closed window blinds of a large pair of windows (5' tall X 6' wide EACH). These windows face to the south. Opposite the windows is a large opening into the room, about 7' X8' and that leads into the living room which also has large windows in it with partially open blinds. The projector is 13'4" from the screen - on a ceiling mount and directly above that is a light fixture which had 2 60 watt bulbs - turned ON. The screen is a Draper Luma 106" diagonal in Contrast Grey.

The camera used was a Canon SX20 set on a tripod in "auto" mode with no flash.

I have done nothing to adjust the picture quality on the projector, but it is set at the default "bright" lamp setting. This is fed via a 35' HDMI cable from an Onkyo TX-SR876 Receiver connected to a cheap ($119) Panasonic DMP-55 Blu-Ray player.

For a relatively well lit room, this Optoma with its 4500 lumens is phenomenal. At dusk and of course full dark it is absolutely stunning. Even at full dark, we usually have a light or two on in the living room, so its not really full dark either.











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post #8 of 17 Old 07-25-2012, 03:49 AM
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Thanks a lot & really appreciate your sharing, SeaVee29. Nice screenshots wink.gif Finally able to see some screenshots of this light cannon pj
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post #9 of 17 Old 07-25-2012, 07:04 AM
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That looks awesome! Unfortunately it is making me doubt my choice of the AR100U projector. Crossing my fingers it works for me!
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post #10 of 17 Old 07-27-2012, 02:08 AM
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As I said before I have not yet done any PQ adjustments with the projector (swamped with some work and other life issues of late).

Over the weekend I'll try and do some basic calibration of the PJ using my Spears & Munsil calibration Blu-Ray and then take a close-up picture in low ambient light setting of a paused 1080P screen image. Already just with the basic picture settings I can tell the black levels are more than suitable, even with the 2500:1 contrast ratio spec of this PJ.

IMHO the massive contrast ratios often touted for devices in the HT world are simply over hyped, and that in most "real life" settings, the average viewer will not notice substantial differences on a 2500:1 vs 50:000:1 contrast ratio.
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post #11 of 17 Old 07-27-2012, 08:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaVee29 View Post

IMHO the massive contrast ratios often touted for devices in the HT world are simply over hyped, and that in most "real life" settings, the average viewer will not notice substantial differences on a 2500:1 vs 50:000:1 contrast ratio.

I agree. Reading the reviews of projectors had me second guessing myself and caused me to take too long on my decision. I finally asked myself how many times have I left a movie theater and talked about how wonderful the skin tones looked and how black the blacks were.
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post #12 of 17 Old 07-27-2012, 08:58 AM
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The high contrast is only important in an optimized room (with dark walls and dark ceiling). In a normal living room you will not see the difference due to a lot of reflected light. Some people argue, that the ANSI contrast will drop down to less than 1:100 in a normal living room.
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post #13 of 17 Old 08-03-2012, 08:50 PM
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Here now are a few pics of scenes, first at daytime (4PM and with blinds fully open - I really don't watch TV this way though) and then again at full dark.

The camera again is on a tri-pod, directly below the PJ and which is about 13 feet from the screen. Unless one is going to spend many thousands of dollars, there is no reasonably priced (under $2K) projector that can project in full daylight conditions like this on a large screen at the same quality as even lower lumen projectors in darkness.

Still, this Optoma TH1060P is watchable even with the blinds open and in full day time, but very, very watchable with the blinds closed in daytime and still alot of ambient light coming in as well.

From a nature show called Wild Russia:

Snowy Owl - full daylight:


Snowy Owl daylight closer up:


Snowy Owl night time:


Bird chicks daylight:


Bird Chicks daylight closer up:


Bird chicks night time:


Eva Green - Princess Sibylla - Kingdom of Heaven Director's Cut Blu-Ray (daylight):


Eva Green - night time:


By the way, none of these pictures really do justice here - it is really impossible to duplicate what it REALLY looks like using a camera to make a 350X700 pixel computer image... Nonetheless, in this last shot at night of Eva Green, one can see the blacks look pretty darn black. In the actual image on the real screen, one can fully distinguish the various folds of the black scarf and it is quite black. So much for the 2500:1 contrast ratio not being "enough".
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post #14 of 17 Old 08-03-2012, 10:41 PM
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Awesome screenshots, really appreciate it wink.gif just curious to know which display mode & lamp brightness setting were you used when you took those screenshots? display mode = bright & lamp brightness setting = bright? btw, did you see any RBE?
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post #15 of 17 Old 08-04-2012, 05:26 AM
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Before taking the second round of pictures I did some basic adjustments of the PJ using my Spears & Munsil High Definition Benchmark Blu-Ray (recommend it highly and also when you use it first go to their website and read the articles on how to use it).

Both the Optoma PJ and my Onkyo TX-SR876 A/V reciever have a very wide range of PQ adjustments, from basic to quite advanced. For these pics, the A/V receiver was set to NO PQ alterations and straight through source resolution to the PJ, all adjustments of PQ were thus done with the PJ only.

Its important to note that when I adjusted the Optoma with the Spears and Munsil disc - I did that at night with the room very dim - so the daylight pictures taken with these same settings I'm sure look worse than they would have if I had used the calibration disc in the daytime instead. So it is probably not fair or relevant to compare the daylight pics to the night ones other than for overall brightness/washout. At any rate, the PJ's settings I had for the second round of pictures above were:

Lamp = Bright

Contrast = -27
Brightness = 3
Color = 11
Tint = -1
Sharpness = 7

In Advanced menu: I had set:
Gamma = Video *
Colot Temp = Warm
Color Space = Auto

* I forgot to change the Gamma when I calibrated to something other than Video. The options are Film, Video, Graphics and Standard. Since the initial calibration I've played around with it and like Graphics setting, but that may be too punchy for some people. I probably need to do the Spears & Munsil disc again and compare the different gamma options with same.

Please remember I am a casual movie and tv viewer with mid-level knowledge of PQ adjustments - I am certainly not hard core in terms of critical ability to professionally review PQ, etc. I'm sure an ISF technician could calibrate all my stuff better, but for me and friends/family who come over to watch TV and movies, this thing really looks awesome.

I have not seen any RBE at all - and I've been trying to notice it. There have been about 20 different people over watching several movies and concerts in the last few weeks and no one has noticed RBE.

One last comment: Before purchasing the TH1060P, I also considered the Optoma HD20, marketed by them as a "home theater" PJ, while the TH1060P is marketed as a "business class" projector. They do not disclose which DLP chip is in it or if its a 3 or 6 segment color wheel, etc. I suspect it has a six segment color wheel but can not confirm that.

The TH1060P has much higher lumens rating (4500 vs 1700), has far more inputs and outputs, but is only a little larger than the HD20. Fan noise is not loud to me either. The HD20 has a higher contrast rating but I don't see any deficiency in the blacks on the TH1060P. It is also a few hundred dollars more expensive than the HD20 of course. But the TH1060 video features and wide array of PQ adjustment capabilities - are just as robust as the "home theater" marketed unit. So far I have no regrets on this purchase and would definitely buy it all over again.
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post #16 of 17 Old 08-11-2012, 02:41 PM
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The Optoma TH1060P in fact DOES use a 6-segment color wheel and it is a Dark Chip 2 DMD Chip.

From Optoma's website on this unit:

"The TH1060P’s multi-color processing system features a six-segment color wheel coated with an advanced material that achieves superb color saturation and accuracy for extraordinary image quality."

From BH Photo video's website on the unit:

"Another of the TH1060P's key features is its Texas Instruments DMD DLP chip. This 0.65" chip processes not just the three primary colors (red, green and blue), that all other chips work on but also their complements: cyan, magenta and yellow. As a result, colors are so clear and lifelike that Texas Instruments calls its latest version of the technology "BrilliantColor". DLP chips with BrilliantColor increase the brightness of colors by 50 percent vs. DLP chips without it. An added advantage of this chip is that it requires no filter that has to be periodically cleaned and replaced, an operation that can be risky in ceiling mounted installations."

More from Optoma's website:

Display Technology: Single 0.65” DC2 DMD Chip DLP Technology by Texas Instruments

Resolution: HD (1920 x 1080)

Brightness: 4500 ANSI Lumens

Contrast Ratio: 2500:1 (Full On/Full Off)

Lamp Life and Type: 3000/2000 Hours (STD/Bright) 300W P-VIP

Throw Ratio: 1.59 to 1.91:1 (Distance/Width)

Projection Distance: 3.28’ to 32.8’ (1.0 to 10m)

Image Size (Diagonal): 23.6” to 300” (0.6 to 7.62m)

Remote Control: IR Remote Mouse Control

Keystone Correction: ±15° Vertical

Displayable Colors: 1.07 Billion

Offset: 115%

Computer Compatibility: HD, UXGA, WXGA, SXGA+, SXGA, XGA, SVGA, VGA Resized, VESA, PC and Macintosh Compatible

Video File Compatibility: NTSC, PAL, SECAM, SDTV (480i), EDTV (480p), HDTV (720p, 1080i/p)

Uniformity: 85%

Projection Lens: F=2.5-2.76, f=23.5-28.2mm, 1.2x Manual Zoom and Focus

Loop Through: D-Sub 15-Pin VGA Output (Functional in Both Normal and Standby Modes)

User Controls: Complete On-Screen Menu Adjustments in 23 Languages

I/O Connectors: Two HDMI, VGA-In, VGA-Out, Component, S-Video, Composite Video, Stereo RCA Audio-In, Stereo Audio-In, Stereo Audio-Out, RS-232, USB, RJ45 and 12V trigger.

Security: Kensington® Lock Port and Keypad Lock

Projection Methods: Front, Rear, Ceiling Mount, Table Top

Weight: 7.8 lbs (3.53kg)

Dimensions (W x H x D): 12.8” x 4.29” x 10.19” (326 x 109 x 259 mm)

Audio: 3-Watt Speaker

Noise Level: 28dB/30dB

Horizontal Scan Rate: 15, 31 - 90 KHz

Vertical Refresh Rate: 50 - 85 Hz

Operating Temperature: 41 to 104°F (5 to 40°C), 85% Max Humidity

Power Supply: AC Input 100-240V, 50-60Hz, Auto-Switching

Power Consumption: 380 Watts (Bright), 320 Watts (STD), <1 Watt (Standby)

Standard Accessories: AC Power Cord, VGA to VGA Cable, Remote Control, Batteries for Remote, Carrying Case, Lens Cap, Multilingual CD-ROM User’s Manual, Quick Start Card and Warranty Card
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post #17 of 17 Old 10-14-2012, 08:41 AM
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I bought a 1060p to use in live presentations for which it is exceptional. Out of curiosity I also set it up in my light controlled home theater and here is my take.

4500 lumens makes bright scenes sizzle like a hi end commercial theater. We watched Battleship on the Optoma and the daytime ocean scenes made you reach for sunscreen. In bright scenes I didn't see much rainbow effect, but it's more noticeable in darker segments. Color rendition and sharpness are both quite good depending on the source. I went through a few blurays and all looked exceptional. The tradeoff is obviously shadow detail and blacks. The background is never darker than a dark gray, so in darker scenes details get lost. My regular projector in that room is a JVC HD350 which has good blacks so it was hard to stay with the Optoma knowing the superior (at least in black levels) JVC was just a click away. That said, if sports and regular broadcast TV were my primary use, the Optoma would be a solid choice. .

In bright mode, I find the Optoma fan too loud for home theater. In the standard lamp mode, it's less noticeable and I would rate it acceptable. There's plenty of brightness in standard mode however so I didn't consider this an issue. Overall, I love this little projector and it's a dream for live presentations. It isn't the "perfect" home theater projector only because of its black levels.
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