Confusion over HDMI standards - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 06-30-2012, 07:44 AM - Thread Starter
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Hi guys, sorry, I am new to 3d and hdmi. I am planning to get optoma hd33 for my home theater set up

The projector is stated as HDMI 1.4a, but I am having trouble to get long cable as I want to mount them on celling.

Mainly on eBay and amazon are 1.4 and not 1.4a,

My question, can I use 1.4 to view 3d when connect to. 3d blu ray and second when I will need 1.4a ?
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post #2 of 14 Old 06-30-2012, 09:23 AM
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Read the desccription for 1.4a at this link
Remember that the naming convention has been changed as can be read here in this link

It might seem confusing at first but just remember that you need to look only at cables labelled High Speed as per the explanation in the link above.

I have NEVER bought HDMI cables from anywhere except MonoPrice as they have the best prices.
Here is the link for their HDMI cable page.

The main thing you need to determine is the minimum length you need to get the job done.

Then make a shortlist of High Speed cables on that page that are available in the next highest length than you need.

If you still have multiple selections in your short list, remember that a longer cable run is better implemented with cables with thicker shielding and the thicker the shielding, the smaller the AWG number.
Also, having Ferrite Cores on the ends is a good thing but it might not be available so dont fret too much about this.

Once you have selected the High Speed cable in the length and thickness you want, you can look at HDMI port savers at this link.
These are useful if you are planning to switch cables at either end as it prevents the HDMI connection at the device end from becoming really loose.
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post #3 of 14 Old 06-30-2012, 10:29 AM
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I'm also using the "standard" HDMI cables (24AWG) from Monoprice for 3D with my Epson 3010 pj. My length is over 40' with 2 couplers and a short "port saver" extension. NO problems whatsoever. You'll be fine.

Ed
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post #4 of 14 Old 06-30-2012, 10:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmbk View Post

My question, can I use 1.4 to view 3d when connect to. 3d blu ray and second when I will need 1.4a ?
HDMI version numbers are irrelevant to cable choice. There are four kinds of cable: standard and high speed, with or without ethernet. You won't find a certified high speed HDMI cable much over 25'. If your run is more than that you will have to use a standard cable. A good standard cable may support 1080p60 to 50' or more, depending on the electronics involved and environment. You will likely need a 22 AWG to 24 AWG cable. If you need high bandwidth and long distance, you may have to use one of the HDMI extender products or an active HDMI cable.
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post #5 of 14 Old 06-30-2012, 10:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nikonf5 View Post

...having Ferrite Cores on the ends is a good thing...
Only if you are trying to prevent your HDMI cable acting as an antenna and transmitting noise from your gear. According to tests, they actually degrade the signal measurably.
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post #6 of 14 Old 06-30-2012, 10:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nikonf5 View Post

If you still have multiple selections in your short list, remember that a longer cable run is better implemented with cables with thicker shielding and the thicker the shielding, the smaller the AWG number.
Total BS.
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post #7 of 14 Old 06-30-2012, 01:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colm View Post

Only if you are trying to prevent your HDMI cable acting as an antenna and transmitting noise from your gear. According to tests, they actually degrade the signal measurably.

You got a link to that??? I'd like to read that. There is way too much conflicting info out there.

Welcome to the darkside.....
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post #8 of 14 Old 06-30-2012, 06:26 PM
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I had a link at one time, but no more. There was a university research paper online on it. It has eye diagrams and everything. You can probably find it if you look. One would think that they would have no effect whatsoever on the TMDS signals because of the use of differential signalling, but they seem to have a measurable, if small, negative effect.

Think about it. If ferrites are good for HDMI cables, why are they only found on the cheapest cables?
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post #9 of 14 Old 06-30-2012, 07:14 PM
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That's interesting because in the VGA days a ferrite core cable DID make quite a difference.

But I buy basic, good quality cables from Monoprice and have not had any issues at all with HDMI cables.

Well, digital vs. analog signals....

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post #10 of 14 Old 06-30-2012, 08:03 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks guys,

These are great info for me, been cracking my head for past few days to understand about the cable.

I will need 40' cable for my installation. Looks like i will need to follow "Old Corps" type of cable.

Is it ok if i get a single length 40' without coupler which will be a "standard cable" or should i get a "high speed cable" and use coupler to connect to get the 40' length ?

i.e -->20 ft 22AWG CL2 High Speed HDMI® Cable - Black , using 2 of them to get 40' ?
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post #11 of 14 Old 06-30-2012, 09:56 PM
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Two 20' high speed cables in series do not make a 40' high speed cable. Use a 22-24 AWG 40' standard speed cable. It is likely to be identical in construction to the a 20' high speed cable from the same source. The only difference is the rating: high speed up to about 25', standard for longer.
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post #12 of 14 Old 06-30-2012, 10:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinman View Post

...in the VGA days a ferrite core cable DID make quite a difference.
The monitor manufacturers started putting ferrites on cables as pixel rates increased and the government cracked down on RFI/EMI. The ferrites are there primarily to prevent the cables from acting as antennas and radiating noise from the attached devices into the environment. I supposed in some cases they could help a single ended analog signal under some circumstances. But all you really need is a properly shielded cable.

The difference with HDMI doesn't have to do so much with digital v. analog, but with the signaling method. The TMDS pairs use differential signalling which largely eliminates the effect of the kind of noise a ferrite can help with. It is the same kind of signalling used for ethernet over twisted pair. Seen any ferrites on Cat 5/6 network cable lately?
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post #13 of 14 Old 07-01-2012, 01:05 AM - Thread Starter
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How about this cable, its rather expensive but is it worth it ?

40ft Ultra Slim High Performance HDMI® Cable w/ RedMere® Technology

http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10240&cs_id=1025501&p_id=9171&seq=1&format=2
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post #14 of 14 Old 07-01-2012, 12:16 PM
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That is an active cable. You will need something like it, or an extender product, if you want full bandwidth at 40'. But you may not need full bandwidth. Are you planning on running 3D at 1080p60, DeepColor, or 4K? If not, a good passive cable will do the job at 1080p60.

The main possible down side I can see to using an active cable like this is that it gets its power from the source device. HDMI sources aren't intended to power other devices. They are only required to put out 55 mA on the 5V line. That may or may be be adequate to provide the required voltage and current to the cable. Some sources are capable of delivering more current. You will only know if it is sufficient once you try.

FWIW monprice has a good return policy if it does not work out for you.
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