Looks like the honeymoon is over. - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 02-26-2013, 01:55 PM - Thread Starter
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No more Wow Factor for me. Reality is creeping in. Projectors can be a pain in the a$$! I'm on my second BenQ W710ST, a replacement for another 710 with a bad speaker. Now, the replacement projector (only 22 hours) has developed what I know to be "dust blobs" (various soft white circles in fade-to-black images) and need to figure out what to do next. Can't be sure if it wasn't delivered in this condition. These DLP projectors are supposed to be "sealed", right? That's nonsense, complete BS! I feel like I've been had. How can these projector companies claim the optics are sealed? BenQ says "No filter needed". Total hogwash.

Heck, I'm so disappointed I might change my forum ID to AVbummed (kidding. Have to keep a sense of humor, no?) So, the way I see it now, here are my options:

1. Remove lamp and suck out what I can using a vac (I don't trust using canned air). Maybe that'll cure the problem.
2. Don't touch a thing and return to Amazon for yet another 710 (and hope I get a "good" one).
3. Send to manufacturer for repair (and hope it's actually fixed).
4. Return for a full refund (and give up).

Any ideas? Your suggetions and comments are very welcome.

PS. I still like the projector. Very unhappy with BenQ.
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post #2 of 7 Old 02-26-2013, 02:14 PM
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I wouldn't mess with anything that's still under warranty. If not I wouldn't use a vacuum cleaner near any optics. Canned air is fine if you hold it upright and still.
I have cleaned the prism, lcd's and optics with a new microfibre lense cloth cut into pieces and attached to strips of card board with double sided tape. Just thin enough to slide between small gaps after blowing out with air to remove any stubborn particles.
Don't use cotton wool tips as these do mark optics and certainly no lense cleaning fluid because the cheap stuff is pants and usually makes things worse! Only stuff worth using is methanol optical fluid. but it's expensive and doesn't leave a residue.
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post #3 of 7 Old 02-27-2013, 06:51 AM - Thread Starter
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Ash, thanks for your suggestions. The projector is under warranty and I am leaning in the direction of getting another replacement, if possible. If not, then it'll have to go in for repair.

Regarding air versus vacuum. There doesn't seem to be a concensus on a best way to clean the internal parts of a projector. Whatever works, I guess. However, it appears, from your description, to be a significant effort requiring hands-on skill.

In the end, I strongly feel new or would-be owners of projectors must be made aware of potential (or eventual) difficulties up front. They should know 1. what manufacturers claim is NOT necessarily true; 2. a projector MUST be inspected and tested upon receipt while knowing WHAT to look for and HOW to look for it; And 3. that modern digital projectors are VERY complicated and sensitive, requiring extra care, more so than any electronic device thay have or will ever own.

There's no doubt, a knowledgable projector owner (with money and time to spare) is a happy one. Right now, unfortunately, I am not one of those. I'll reluctantly give it one more try.
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post #4 of 7 Old 02-27-2013, 07:14 AM
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There's definitely some truth to what you are saying. I've had various common problems over the years. Failed light tunnel on the Infocus 4805, "red blotching" with Infocus X10, some dust on the lens of a Acer 5360 (which I did clean with compressed air IIRC), cranky iris on my current Benq W6000 (which seems to be working now that I did a full reset).

BUT, there's just no replacement for a front projector. No TV can match it unless you pay $$$$$$ for a huge LCD, but even then those displays IMO don't match the natural/realistic picture you can get from a projector.
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post #5 of 7 Old 02-27-2013, 09:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by avfrenzy View Post

Ash, thanks for your suggestions. The projector is under warranty and I am leaning in the direction of getting another replacement, if possible. If not, then it'll have to go in for repair.

Regarding air versus vacuum. There doesn't seem to be a concensus on a best way to clean the internal parts of a projector. Whatever works, I guess. However, it appears, from your description, to be a significant effort requiring hands-on skill.

In the end, I strongly feel new or would-be owners of projectors must be made aware of potential (or eventual) difficulties up front. They should know 1. what manufacturers claim is NOT necessarily true; 2. a projector MUST be inspected and tested upon receipt while knowing WHAT to look for and HOW to look for it; And 3. that modern digital projectors are VERY complicated and sensitive, requiring extra care, more so than any electronic device thay have or will ever own.

There's no doubt, a knowledgable projector owner (with money and time to spare) is a happy one. Right now, unfortunately, I am not one of those. I'll reluctantly give it one more try.

In terms of money and time, I've been happy so far with my LED projector (LG PA70G). Knock on wood, it has been going strong for about 6 months, and that is with some heavy usage, including kids who don't always take care of things. I got the LED projector specifically because I didn't want to deal with finicky bulbs and related issues. In that regard, the PA70G functions like a TV, with little concern about hour usage or how often it is turned on and off. Or in the case of my kids - on/off/on/off/on ... lol. At $450 it has mainly been one thing - fun. That's what it should be about - enjoying movies and games on a big 100" screen. If you have a light controlled environment and don't mind the limitations, consider an LED projector to reduce some of the things that can go wrong. (Note - my unfinished basement is a bit dusty, but so far no dust blob issues with the PA70G. But I have been thinking about putting some filter material over the air intake as a precaution.)
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post #6 of 7 Old 02-27-2013, 09:35 AM - Thread Starter
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I whole-heartedly agree. My 710 is 720p and I am very satisfied with the image it displays. Color is fantastic. Detail and contrast is very good (and I'm sourcing from an old SD DVD player). I can only imagine how spectacular a high-end 1080p must be on bluray (I'm afraid to go there. I'd be a projector addict, for sure.)

Still, they do have issues. I suppose projectors, with all there individual and common quirks, are not meant for the masses. They are a subset of the wider world of AV, much like a muscle car is to an auto enthusiast. They require learning, money, time and often, patience. They're not for everyone.
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post #7 of 7 Old 02-27-2013, 11:08 AM
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To me- a man of relatively modest means- they're (entry-level projectors) nearly on the verge of being disposable items at this point. Seriously, just look at what you can get for $800-$1000. If you get 3-4 years out of it I'd say you're doing pretty well considering the screen size and what you pay for a decent 55-60" flat panel.

I'm not trying to be flip here, but most would agree that a PJ is (largely) still a luxury item...if you can keep one around for ~$20 a month I think you're doing alright.

Still, sorry you're having more problems than most, it seems.

James

Actual phone call (see pic to left):

 

Tech (responding to laughter): "I'm sorry sir, did I miss something?"

Me: "Yeah, a case of Diet Mountain Dew walking across my living room."

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