fed by 50 foot extension cable? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 01-26-2014, 11:22 AM - Thread Starter
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i have a cyber power 1350 uninterupptable power supply. I'd like to hook up 2 other rooms to it in my house so three rooms are attached to it. Is this ok? I live alone so I wont be using all 3 rooms at once so I'm not worried about overloading my UPS. one room would require a 30 foot extension cable to reach the room, at which point I'd add a x2 power cord splitter to feed #1 my AVR, and #2 feed my ceiling mounted projector with another 20 ft extension cord. So that means the projector is fed 50 ft between to extension cords plugged together. Is this ok? My other room would require a 20 ft extension cable for my 65 inch plasma and PC.
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post #2 of 9 Old 01-26-2014, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by leiff View Post

i have a cyber power 1350 uninterupptable power supply. I'd like to hook up 2 other rooms to it in my house so three rooms are attached to it. Is this ok? I live alone so I wont be using all 3 rooms at once so I'm not worried about overloading my UPS. one room would require a 30 foot extension cable to reach the room, at which point I'd add a x2 power cord splitter to feed #1 my AVR, and #2 feed my ceiling mounted projector with another 20 ft extension cord. So that means the projector is fed 50 ft between to extension cords plugged together. Is this ok? My other room would require a 20 ft extension cable for my 65 inch plasma and PC.

No problem, but I would use 14 gauge cords. Or buy the #14 flexible wire that the cords are made from and ends to make my own custom cords. Did this for my generator making snakes with 2 gang boxes on wood supports with rubber feet. I can power basement heater/fridges, kitchen and upstairs necessities without backfeeding the panel or having major work done for the few times the generator is needed.

In your case the #14 is not really needed as none of the units really pull much current but you don't want to introduce any voltage drop from the long runs of thin wire. The heavy gauge is to prevent the voltage drop, not because the units will overload #16 wire. #16 would probably be fine, but as I said, I would do #14

Also code would prohibit fishing these cords in the wall so they would need to be out in the open, or tucked against the wall..
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post #3 of 9 Old 01-26-2014, 12:49 PM - Thread Starter
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monoprice doesn't sell 30 foot extension cables so am i OK to buy a 50 foot extension cable( it will be going under my house by the way) and when it comes into my other room be attached to existing 25 ft 16 AWG extension cable feeding my projector for a total of 75 ft run to my projector? My AVR in the projector room will be fed directly from the 50 ft extension cable as it's located right where the extension cable will come through the floor. momoprice sells 16 awg 50 ft for $25 and 14 awg 50 ft for $35. should I buy the thicker guage 50 ft cable even though it's connecting to my thinner guage 16 awg 25 ft cable? What i'd like is smaller terminals or modular connectors. What bothers me the most is drilling holes wide enough in my floor to acomidate these wide tripple pronged plugs. Not to mention I have hdmi cables routed through the same holes.
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post #4 of 9 Old 01-26-2014, 01:11 PM
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If you're going under your house you should be using proper electrical cable and terminations, not extension cords - if that's something you're not comfortable with you should consult an electrician for assistance. HDMI/low voltage connections are a different animal from line voltage wiring.
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post #5 of 9 Old 01-27-2014, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by WestCDA View Post

If you're going under your house you should be using proper electrical cable and terminations, not extension cords - if that's something you're not comfortable with you should consult an electrician for assistance. HDMI/low voltage connections are a different animal from line voltage wiring.

That would likely be cheaper (assuming you terminated the ends yourself), but not necessarily any better, though the OP would also be able to make the cord the exact length needed that way. But a commercial grade, heavy guage extension cord will likely have just as thick, if not a thicker hide, so to speak, than most stock electric wire. I would suggest tacking it to the bottoms of the floor joists, rather than just letting it lay on the ground, but even that isn't absolutely necessary, unless you've got a pretty bad rat problem. The OP might also be better off shopping at Lowes or Home Depot. I really don't know what monoprice sells, but any dropcord that'll meet OSHA standards for construction use, where it's dragged through the rain and mud day in day out, powering high current table saws, circular saws, and other power tools that'll trip a breaker a lot faster than any HT component, should do the job as well as anything.

I would think the biggest concern would be if the CyberPower is rated to handle the loads, should more than one room be in use at any given time, especially if you need it for proper shutdown in the event of a power outage for multiple devices at the same time.
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Also code would prohibit fishing these cords in the wall so they would need to be out in the open, or tucked against the wall..

I don't know about CA or PA, but in NC building code doesn't really apply when you're doing the wiring yourself, in a residence that you yourself own or have permission from the property owner. That said, electricity isn't something you want to take chances with, if you're not sure about what you're doing.

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post #6 of 9 Old 01-27-2014, 10:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Chad Varnadore View Post


... I don't know about CA or PA, but in NC building code doesn't really apply when you're doing the wiring yourself, in a residence that you yourself own or have permission from the property owner. That said, electricity isn't something you want to take chances with, if you're not sure about what you're doing.

I think that a lot of localities will allow homeowners to do electrical work on their own property - but they need to pull a permit and get a final inspection (which would of course require the workmanship to meet code). Extension cords under floors or in walls are not something that will meet any electrical code I've ever seen. Are you sure that in NC a homeowner is allowed to do this?
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post #7 of 9 Old 01-27-2014, 04:05 PM
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You don't need to pull permits to install new outlets in your home from what I understand.

I've done a fair bit of electrical around my home and it is far less cumbersome than A/V as long as you do some research and do things properly.

First:

Get outdoor rated electrical wire. This is available at Home Depot or Lowes.

Second, if this is to extend a UPS, then put in wall extension plates and proper back boxes in your wall. Come up through the floor into the wall, and into a blue Carlon electrical box.

On the end with the UPS you put this in the wall:
http://www.amazon.com/Midlite-MDT4642W-Single-Gang-Decor-Recessed/dp/B002XDQAA6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1390863806&sr=8-1&keywords=power+inlet

On the other end, you put a standard Duplex outlet ($1.00 - Home Depot).

So, perhaps $50 per location to do this to code and a few hours work. Not sure it will take any more/less time than running an electrical cord, but I'm not sure that taking an extension cord through everything will actually be to code, which I would shoot to avoid for insurance reasons.

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post #8 of 9 Old 01-27-2014, 06:08 PM
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This came up at the top of a search for NC homeowner performed electrical work.

County Code Enforcement

Excerpt from that document (emphasis mine):

"The state of North Carolina allows you to personally do your own wiring in your own home provided you personally will reside in the home and that it is not for rent or intended for sale within one year after you complete the electrical installation. All electrical installations, changes, additions, or modifications to wiring systems are subject to permitting and inspections."

That means you can legally do wiring, in your home only, without hiring a certified electrician - but it's still subject to a permit before starting work and an inspection afterward to ensure compliance.

Not trying to rain on anyone's parade, but I'm pretty sure you'll find that any state's electrical code will specify that extension cords can NEVER be used in place of permanent (and especially concealed) wiring. Doing it right is not an expensive proposition - keep your home and family safe, your insurance coverage in place should an incident occur, and your home able to pass an inspection for resale. An extension cord popping out of a hole in the floor is not going to pass anybody's inspection - for electrical code compliance, insurance coverage, or a conditional home purchase.

For someone considering drilling holes for hidden extension cords as a viable solution, getting an electrician in to do the job properly would be money well spent.
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post #9 of 9 Old 01-29-2014, 01:27 AM
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I'd assume that the OPs reason for even thinking about something as unconventional as running a drop cord room to room is that they're trying to save money and lack the experience to confidently assemble a makeshift drop cord as was previously suggested.

I don't know what permits cost in Calgary, but if CA is anything like NC, the OP would be better off investing the money in another two Cyberpowers, or APCs, if battery backup isn't needed for any rooms. In fact they might even come out cheaper. It'd certainly be lot less trouble (especially if thier building inspection dept is spread as thin as ours) and a better long-term solution as well.

The reality is, people rig stuff like the proposed all the time, in violation of code or not. It's kind of like speeding, except, there's nothing the inspection dept can do, on the extremly slim chance they'd find out about it. I'd be surprised if they even cared. I

I'm not a licensed electrician, though I know and have worked with plenty in the field - residential construction being the family business and all, since 1970 - and I've seen and done my share of wiring. I suspect any legislation related to using power cords in walls to be based on the much more varied (lax) construction standards of such cabling or even the manner in which such cords are most commonly installed - considering such would likely on be used after the fact, and most don't want to replace drywall and repaint the whole room. If they're really that worried about a building code that makes less and less sense every year, with many regulations that have less to do with safety than lining someones pockets, run the cable in conduit.

Having seen lots of wiring hastily installed with breaks and punctures in the jacket still get passed, by inspectors whom are considered overly strict (not experienced enough in the trades they police to reasonably interpret how to apply code) even by fellow inspectors, having dissected many commercial-grade drop cords when repairing cuts or re-terminating damaged ends, and having hand-stripped (for salvage) thousands of feet of electrical wire of varying guages, builds, and ages spanning standards going back 70 years, I'd have no compunction with substituting a quality guage/built power cord in a wall if I really need to, as extremely unlikely as such might be.

That said, I wouldn't recommend taking the route inquired about either.

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