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post #1 of 20 Old 08-04-2014, 12:32 AM - Thread Starter
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Question BenQ 1080ST, screen issues and questions



I'm looking into buying my first projector. I've read so many posts and reviews and watched so many videos and I still am not sure if it will work out. I'm ready to get it going and make a decision. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

The room: 10 foot ceilings and viewing distance of around 14 feet. A little over 15 feet from back wall to screen wall. I've painted the walls a darker color, installed better blinds and generally darkened the entire area up significantly. Ambient light is a minor issue during the day but should be bearable. It would be nice to have a lamp on if I wanted while using the projector at night. Lights off and/or nightime viewing most of the time for movies and things like that.

The screen: I'm not sure. I'm going to go with a vapex white fixed frame screen (1.1 gain). A 110" would fit fine and allow the tower speakers to easily fit on the sides. A 120" is really pushing the boundary of what is possible but would also fit, although I would have to cram the speakers pretty much right between the screen frame borders and 1) a corner wall on the left and 2) molding around a door on the right. Putting a speaker in a corner may cause poor quality sound- not sure. Maybe I could angle it a little away from the wall. Anyhow, I'm leaning towards the 110".

The projector: Most likely a BenQ 1080ST. Table mount.

Use: Regular TV, movies, video games


Here are my concerns/questions:

1) Can I really project a clear, uniform, bright and undistorted image onto a 110" to 120" screen? Can the 1080 really handle that large of an image?

2) Is hotspotting a serious concern for this projector?

3) With the extreme angle of the projected image, will I be able to get a consistent and clear picture?

4) Lamp life... although this sounds like it is just a fact of life for any projector user... 1500-2000 hours of life as stated by the BenQ website. This sounds like I'll need to buy a new lamp every year. How long should I reasonably expect a lamp to last, considering that I'm replacing my TV in the family room with this projector and it's gonna be the main source for TV and movies and such?

5) I've read in many places, especially here in this forum, that one should get the biggest screen your wall and room can handle- but the vapex salesman told me to go smaller so that I don't sacrifice quality for quantity. So, go as big as possible and cram it all in... or take a minor hit on the size and go with the 110"? Or should I go even smaller? I want to get a quality picture, not a huge, blurry distortion with brightness/hotspot issues.

6) Is it possible for an image to be "too" bright? If I have the 1080ST 6-feet or so from the screen, will it be way too much?


I really appreciate your assistance with this. I want to get this thing set up and running but I also don't want to rush into a mistake. I have considered the BenQ W1070 as a possible alternative, but ceiling mounting is not an option. Because of the room size, I would have to put the 1070 pretty much right directly in front of the couch on a coffee table and zoom it in. Fan noise and the projector right there in my face all the time. Doesn't sound too great and is probably not a realistic option. Can the 1080ST do the job???
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post #2 of 20 Old 08-04-2014, 08:11 AM
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I've been researching projectors a lot recently, and I can tell you the one thing that really turned me off about the 1080st. I too wanted it for it's short throw capability, and wanted to sit it on a table.

However, the CNET review specifically mentions that this projector uses "digital keystone correction" which is another way of saying in order to adjust the image so you're not looking at a trapezoidal rectangle, the projector uses a software solution and it introduces artifacts. Basically it introduces ugly noise around straight lines.

So as the reviewer put it, people wanting to put this projector on a coffee table are basically presented two unpleasant choices. Watch a trapezoidal image, or deal with the artifacts correcting it introduces.

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post #3 of 20 Old 08-04-2014, 08:45 AM
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Doesn't that apply to ALL keystone corrections that all projectors have? Sometimes these reviews emphasize things wrongly. Keystone correction has always been different from lens shift and if you need lens shift you have to diligently look for it.
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post #4 of 20 Old 08-04-2014, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Tigerriot View Post
I've been researching projectors a lot recently, and I can tell you the one thing that really turned me off about the 1080st. I too wanted it for it's short throw capability, and wanted to sit it on a table.

However, the CNET review specifically mentions that this projector uses "digital keystone correction" which is another way of saying in order to adjust the image so you're not looking at a trapezoidal rectangle, the projector uses a software solution and it introduces artifacts. Basically it introduces ugly noise around straight lines.

So as the reviewer put it, people wanting to put this projector on a coffee table are basically presented two unpleasant choices. Watch a trapezoidal image, or deal with the artifacts correcting it introduces.
I know the review you're speaking of, and he wasn't terribly clear on this point: placed correctly, on a stable surface and aimed at a wall or screen perpendicular to the lens, the W1080ST will produce a perfectly rectangular image. The keystone correction is only there if you can't meet those requirements, same as any other projector that features it (which is pretty much all of them).

Now, the W1080ST can be more fiddly to place than a standard projector, just because the more extreme angle at which it's projecting is less forgiving of an uneven surface, but it's just plain false to say that using keystone is required. Careful placement eliminates the need for it, same as any other projector.

Farmhill, 1080p on a 120 inch screen looks just fine. Keep in mind that plenty of movies are still shot, finished and displayed theatrically in 2K, which is practically identical to 1080p. If you get close to the screen then sure, you'll see the pixels, but if you're sitting far enough back to actually take in the entire image, you won't. And the W1080ST will certainly be bright enough to light all of it, even in eco mode.

Speaking of which, in eco mode the lamp is rated for 6,000 hours, not 2,000. Hell, even in standard mode it's rated for 3,500.
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post #5 of 20 Old 08-04-2014, 09:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerriot View Post
I've been researching projectors a lot recently, and I can tell you the one thing that really turned me off about the 1080st. I too wanted it for it's short throw capability, and wanted to sit it on a table.

However, the CNET review specifically mentions that this projector uses "digital keystone correction" which is another way of saying in order to adjust the image so you're not looking at a trapezoidal rectangle, the projector uses a software solution and it introduces artifacts. Basically it introduces ugly noise around straight lines.

So as the reviewer put it, people wanting to put this projector on a coffee table are basically presented two unpleasant choices. Watch a trapezoidal image, or deal with the artifacts correcting it introduces.
Not sure what this CNET review is trying to say because surely most projectors will have some keystone correction capabilities which are most likely software enabled. The key with this projector (any projector really) is to try and avoid the need to apply the keystone correction. That means keeping the projector as "square" to the screen as possible (no tilting the projector from front to back and making sure it is as parallel to the screen as possible). If you have use keystone, then maybe this is not the best projector to get.

I have this projector and do not employ any keystone correction. The picture is very sharp and distortion free. The main things people have noted is that the optics are not top-notch so the edges of the picture may be a little out of focus when the center is in focus (or vice versa) and the brightness uniformity may not be the best (one side may be a little brighter than the other). There are variations from unit to unit, and while mine is not perfect, I am very happy with it given the price I paid. IMHO, there is almost no display device that can really match the bang-for-buck that the BenQ W1070/1080st delivers.

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post #6 of 20 Old 08-04-2014, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Crazy4HD View Post
Not sure what this CNET review is trying to say because surely most projectors will have some keystone correction capabilities which are most likely software enabled. The key with this projector (any projector really) is to try and avoid the need to apply the keystone correction. That means keeping the projector as "square" to the screen as possible (no tilting the projector from front to back and making sure it is as parallel to the screen as possible). If you have use keystone, then maybe this is not the best projector to get.

I have this projector and do not employ any keystone correction. The picture is very sharp and distortion free. The main things people have noted is that the optics are not top-notch so the edges of the picture may be a little out of focus when the center is in focus (or vice versa) and the brightness uniformity may not be the best (one side may be a little brighter than the other). There are variations from unit to unit, and while mine is not perfect, I am very happy with it given the price I paid. IMHO, there is almost no display device that can really match the bang-for-buck that the BenQ W1070/1080st delivers.
Interesting. That CNET review pretty bluntly stated that if you wanted to place the projector on a coffee table, it was going to produce a trapezoidal image. After reading that review I had written off the 1080st because I am only interested in a coffee table setup.

So you're saying I can put the projector on an evenly leveled coffee table like surface, and it will project a perfectly rectangular image to my wall? Where would the bottom of the image be lining up in regards to the project if it were sitting on my coffee table?

Do those uniformity and focus issues also exist with the 1070? Would the average person notice one side of the screen being brighter, or is this the kind of thing that only a light meter truly reveals?


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post #7 of 20 Old 08-04-2014, 09:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerriot View Post
Interesting. That CNET review pretty bluntly stated that if you wanted to place the projector on a coffee table, it was going to produce a trapezoidal image. After reading that review I had written off the 1080st because I am only interested in a coffee table setup.

So you're saying I can put the projector on an evenly leveled coffee table like surface, and it will project a perfectly rectangular image to my wall? Where would the bottom of the image be lining up in regards to the project if it were sitting on my coffee table?

Do those uniformity and focus issues also exist with the 1070? Would the average person notice one side of the screen being brighter, or is this the kind of thing that only a light meter truly reveals?
I have mine sitting on a table about 7 feet from a 120 inch screen. The center of the lens is at about 21 inches, the bottom of the screen is about 24 inches, so it shoots at a slight upward angle. You should use the calculator on BenQ website (http://www.benq.com/microsite/projec...tiocalculator/) to get more precise measurements.

In terms of brightness uniformity, it seem to be more noticeable on the earlier units and has improved with the later ones. Mine (a 1080st) is one of the later ones (March 2014 build), but I sometimes notice that the left side of the image is a little brighter than the right whenever there is a full screen solid color image displayed. It's not noticeable with normal content. I believe the situation is similar with the 1070. Focus may be a little better with the 1070 because of the longer throw, but even there, there seems to be sweet spot to get the best (most uniform) focus. You should check the 1070 thread for more details about that.

Anyway, hope that helps.

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post #8 of 20 Old 08-04-2014, 10:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerriot View Post
Interesting. That CNET review pretty bluntly stated that if you wanted to place the projector on a coffee table, it was going to produce a trapezoidal image. After reading that review I had written off the 1080st because I am only interested in a coffee table setup.

So you're saying I can put the projector on an evenly leveled coffee table like surface, and it will project a perfectly rectangular image to my wall? Where would the bottom of the image be lining up in regards to the project if it were sitting on my coffee table?

Do those uniformity and focus issues also exist with the 1070? Would the average person notice one side of the screen being brighter, or is this the kind of thing that only a light meter truly reveals?
Useless cnet review. They fault the machine for being a short throw project with no manual lens shift as though such a thing is standard. In the next sentence they claim that because of the use of semiproprietary 3d glasses, which are not included, that the 3d feature is almost guaranteed to not be used. Obviously the reviewer does not know that most projectors do not come with glasses, manufacturer's glasses are usually overpriced, and there is an active market of 3rd party glasses. I'm surprised the reviewer didn't specifically criticize the 1080st for not coming with its own screen.
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post #9 of 20 Old 08-04-2014, 11:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerriot View Post
Interesting. That CNET review pretty bluntly stated that if you wanted to place the projector on a coffee table, it was going to produce a trapezoidal image. After reading that review I had written off the 1080st because I am only interested in a coffee table setup.

So you're saying I can put the projector on an evenly leveled coffee table like surface, and it will project a perfectly rectangular image to my wall? Where would the bottom of the image be lining up in regards to the project if it were sitting on my coffee table?

Do those uniformity and focus issues also exist with the 1070? Would the average person notice one side of the screen being brighter, or is this the kind of thing that only a light meter truly reveals?
CNET's unspoken assumption in the path from "place on table -> need keystone" is that they assume you'll want the bottom of the image to be significantly higher than the coffee table. If you're okay with where it throws the picture by default (which is immediately above the projector itself), then there's no need for keystone. It's terrible reviewing on their part to make this assumption without actually stating it, because it leads to misconceptions like this. The W1080ST functions the same as every other projector without lens shift: fussy, but manageable with planning.
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post #10 of 20 Old 08-04-2014, 08:26 PM
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You can expect the image to be naturally square with the screen about an inch or two above the projector's top, OR you can raise the image even higher and use digital keystone to keep it square in which case you'll lose a little bit of resolution in the scaling and formerly straight vertical lines will (while being re-straightened) become a little jagged or pixel-edged looking..the only "ugly noise around" anything would be a result of having sharpness cranked too high along with other inaccurate settings and likely poor source material that has image-noise to accentuate.

A 110" screen will be a perfectly fine size for almost anyone sitting as close as 8ft or as far as 12ft. If you like it big and dramatic, you can simply scoot the seating a bit closer and still keep the same size screen. The w1080 is bright enough to go much bigger than even 120" in a fairly dark room so 120" is no problem. It also has eco-mode to dim the image if you think it looks too bright at 110" PLUS the smaller screen (which makes for a brighter image) will allow you to have a little more light in the room without totally washing out the picture. At 6ft back, the w1080 makes a 100"-105" image.

If you use it in full lamp mode, expect around 3000+hours, if you use it on eco or smart-eco (which it seems most do) you can usually expect around 5000 or more hours of life. If you use it 4hours a day, every day, you'll still get a couple years using the bulb-eating-est setting..at others you can pretty easily reach twice as long. The first lamp death I read about here was after 6000hours on smart-eco, so you'll probably be good for half a decade. Keep things away from the vents to let it breath and stick a vacuum against them every couple of weeks to keep them clean.

Brightness uniformity won't really be a problem for normal movie/game content, but as said, can show somewhat in test images designed to show it if present.

Hotspotting is a problem and fault of the screen which can be hidden or diminished by particularly long-throw projectors and hidden a little by dimmer ones..the w1080 being both short-throw AND bright will NOT be able to fix a screen that hotspots, but it isn't the projector's fault..and the w1080 will perform very well with any screen that doesn't hotspot.
The easiest way to avoid hotspotting is by finding a bright white screen with a gain right around 1.0 or even a little lower if possible. The higher the gain and/or the darker the screen, the more likely it is to hotspot, generally. Keep in mind that most screens rated lower than 1.0 tend to be dark (aka, not bright white) and are very capable of hotspotting because their gain is often increased from 0.5 up to 0.8 (a massive 60% boost that can look very shiny).

Your screen around 1.1 is likely fine, but it's worth seeing if it has a return policy just in case (though I'm pretty sure they're uncommon for screens). Searching for reviews is a good idea too.

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post #11 of 20 Old 08-04-2014, 11:03 PM - Thread Starter
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Thank you to everyone for the responses. It's wonderful to hear from those with projector experience and I appreciate your time.

I'm going to go with the 1080ST. Placing the projector 1" below the screen bottom will not be a problem for me and, with the short throw, I have plenty of space to adjust and line the projector up just right. I'm going to set the 1080ST at maximum zoom (where it throws the largest image possible) and then move it forward or back until it fits the screen (due to recommendations I read in another thread). This should help with uniformity and, according to the other thread, is the ONLY way to get the most uniform picture. I am going to avoid digital keystone correction at all costs.

The screen has minimal gain (1.1) and there is a return policy, so I'm going to give it a try. I'm going to get the package deal from visual apex for the screen and projector, since it works out cheaper than splitting up the screen and projector from multiple sites (based on the prices I have seen). It sounds like I should not be surprised if there is hotspotting, but other threads say that this tends to decline greatly by the time one reaches 80 hours on the lamp for a 1080ST. Also, other threads say that there is a chance that I won't have any noticeable hotpsot at all while watching regular content like movies. Hopefully, it won't be too much of a problem. Time will tell.

The BenQ FAQ section had me thinking that the lamp life was 1500-2000 hours. That is straight up what it says. Great to know that I should be able to expect significantly more than that.

The last decision is 110" or 120" screen- and then I'm ready to buy. I've taped off the screen size for the 110" with painters tape and I'm going to sit and look at it and think about it for a while after I submit this post. THX recommendations make it sound like 120" is better for my 13.5 to 14-foot viewing distance (125.3" was the THX calculator result for 14-feet, 120.8" for 13.5-feet ). Still undecided.

THX calculator page: http://myhometheater.homestead.com/v...alculator.html

If anyone knows of any less than $500 110-120" screens out there and can throw out some recommendations, please let me know. I will also search out some more screen reviews. The vapex screens appear to have very good reviews and look like better frame construction than others I've checked out in a similar price range. The felt wrap gets good reviews and the fact there isn't a huge logo on it is a plus for me.

One more question---

Will I be able to use the legs of the projector itself to level the projector up or will I need to find some other way to level it up on the table? (I read somewhere that only ONE of the legs is adjustable and this sounds kinda stupid to have only one adjustable leg- please tell me this is incorrect).
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post #12 of 20 Old 08-04-2014, 11:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmhill View Post
Thank you to everyone for the responses. It's wonderful to hear from those with projector experience and I appreciate your time.

I'm going to go with the 1080ST. Placing the projector 1" below the screen bottom will not be a problem for me and, with the short throw, I have plenty of space to adjust and line the projector up just right. I'm going to set the 1080ST at maximum zoom (where it throws the largest image possible) and then move it forward or back until it fits the screen (due to recommendations I read in another thread). This should help with uniformity and, according to the other thread, is the ONLY way to get the most uniform picture. I am going to avoid digital keystone correction at all costs.

The screen has minimal gain (1.1) and there is a return policy, so I'm going to give it a try. I'm going to get the package deal from visual apex for the screen and projector, since it works out cheaper than splitting up the screen and projector from multiple sites (based on the prices I have seen). It sounds like I should not be surprised if there is hotspotting, but other threads say that this tends to decline greatly by the time one reaches 80 hours on the lamp for a 1080ST. Also, other threads say that there is a chance that I won't have any noticeable hotpsot at all while watching regular content like movies. Hopefully, it won't be too much of a problem. Time will tell.

The BenQ FAQ section had me thinking that the lamp life was 1500-2000 hours. That is straight up what it says. Great to know that I should be able to expect significantly more than that.

The last decision is 110" or 120" screen- and then I'm ready to buy. I've taped off the screen size for the 110" with painters tape and I'm going to sit and look at it and think about it for a while after I submit this post. THX recommendations make it sound like 120" is better for my 13.5 to 14-foot viewing distance (125.3" was the THX calculator result for 14-feet, 120.8" for 13.5-feet ). Still undecided.

THX calculator page: http://myhometheater.homestead.com/v...alculator.html

If anyone knows of any less than $500 110-120" screens out there and can throw out some recommendations, please let me know. I will also search out some more screen reviews. The vapex screens appear to have very good reviews and look like better frame construction than others I've checked out in a similar price range. The felt wrap gets good reviews and the fact there isn't a huge logo on it is a plus for me.

One more question---

Will I be able to use the legs of the projector itself to level the projector up or will I need to find some other way to level it up on the table? (I read somewhere that only ONE of the legs is adjustable and this sounds kinda stupid to have only one adjustable leg- please tell me this is incorrect).
I have the W1070, so this may not be identical on the W1080ST, but one of the rear legs is adjustable, along with the front middle leg.

As for screen size, I'd recommend getting the projector first and projecting on the wall for a little bit to get a feel for what kind of size you're comfortable with.
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post #13 of 20 Old 08-05-2014, 01:40 AM - Thread Starter
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I've laid out the 110" screen size on the wall using painter's tape. I also laid out the boundaries of the 120" frame. I sat and looked at it and measured and measured and thought and thought.

It looks like the setup is going to be the BenQ 1080ST and a Visual Apex, fixed screen, white, 1.1 gain, 110" screen. The 120" screen would push too far into the corner and is just too tight of a fit, it appears. I wanted to go as big as possible but, from what I'm reading around the forums, the world of projectors is usually a world of trade-offs.

For my trade off of 10-inches in diagonal, I'll get: a little more brightness, a little sharper picture, more distance (about 3 feet) from the flat white ceiling (which is a little over 9-feet high, not 10- although it has always been called a 10-foot ceiling), more distance from the corner wall (which, although painted a darker color, would still certainly reflect some light back to the screen) and breathing room for the speaker system.

The 1080ST should sit approximately 6'7" back from the screen, one inch below the screen bottom and approximately 19-inches off of the floor. Projectorcentral's calculator says I should get around 27 fL with this setup.

Since I'm getting them as a package deal, I won't be able to try it out and see what screen size I'm most comfortable with. I'm sure I would have been fine with the 120", and the taped off markers for the 110" screen boundary fit my field of vision very well. So... 110 it is.


If anyone sees any problem with this setup, PLEASE let me know since I plan on purchasing soon. Also, I want to be able to watch 3D movies, so if there is any foreseeable problem with that, again, please let me know.

Thank you all very much for your input.

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post #14 of 20 Old 08-05-2014, 05:54 AM
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Sounds like a good plan and having that return policy is a great relief in case there's any issue with the screen (though I'm assuming you'll have to return both items and then re-purchase just the Benq if there's a problem).

For 3D glasses, check out the specific "3D glasses for w1070" thread for the most thorough info, otherwise I've generally heard the Estar glasses are fantastic, the Sainsonic allow red flashing through and should be avoided, and the $12 g15 look good. I've only tried the g15's personally so I can't say how they compare against the Estar's, but neither one bleeds red and both are very acceptable so the Estar get the nod if budget allows and the g15 are a good alternative if you need a ton or want a cheaper set for the kids/neighbors. ..neighbors' kids.. you CAN mix and match just fine. You'll be looking at universal 144Hz compatible DLP-link 3D glasses.

For an alternative screen choice, if your screen wall is fairly smooth you can roll on some flat-white interior latex (just simple light-base), brand isn't an issue so going cheap is fine. Once it dries in an hour or two it won't hotspot at all, it'll give fantastic colors, the best uniformity and viewing angles, the fewest artifacts and all for around $20 to buy the pan+roller+paint+pair of 1/4" roller pads. There's no special trick to painting it on because flat-white hides rollermarks and small blemishes really well, it takes five minutes, and it makes no mess if you roll at a moderate pace and give a roll against the pan before bringing the roller to the wall.
If you don't like it, you're out $20. If you do like it, you can make a nice, non-logo'd frame by stapling some felt or velvet around the back of some wooden trim or even just use the fabric alone with curled edges and Velcro or double-sided tape. I've even heard flat-black hockey tape works alright.
Anyway, something for the back pocket if the screen doesn't work out.

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post #15 of 20 Old 08-17-2014, 06:44 AM - Thread Starter
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I got the 1080ST, the 110" screen, the whole package from Visual Apex. I put the screen together today, mounted it on the wall, aligned the projector on the table top using the test pattern, hooked up the receiver and speakers and-- it is awesome. I completely love it and I am so glad that I decided to try a projector.

3D... looks great and is amazing on such a large screen (Estar glasses). Hotspots... I don't see any (and, believe me, I am trying to find them). The color and brightness appear uniform and the picture does not appear distorted even though I have not done a very thorough alignment yet. I have not changed any color settings other than to "cinema". I am watching in smart eco mode (except for 3D content when it appears to default to higher brightness) and smart eco is plenty bright.

Rainbow effects... yes, but tolerable, only occasional, and the setup is totally worth it. If I had never heard about the rainbow effect, I probably wouldn't notice them nearly as much. Having heard about them, I find myself looking for them or even trying to make them happen by darting my eyes around the screen. I didn't tell the wife about them and she only sees the huge, awesome picture.

I've found that I don't see the rainbow effect when looking at one part of the image, whether it is light/dark/light and dark/light and dark with motion/etc. I notice rainbow colors when I move my eyes quickly around the screen. Instead of when the action moves across the screen, it happens when my eyes move quickly around the screen- but not always. It's odd that it doesn't seem to happen consistently. Two scenes with similar lighting may not produce the same effect. Zero rainbow effects under any circumstances have been noted while watching 3D content.

I'm searching the forums but, if anyone could direct me towards adjustments to the color balance and brightness, etc. to get the best picture, that would be great. Also, if there is any way to minimize rainbow effects, let me know.
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post #16 of 20 Old 08-17-2014, 07:15 AM - Thread Starter
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After more forum searches, this is where I am:

RBE: I'm going to, first, give it some time. For starters, it's not that bad right now as-is (and this is projector world, Day One) and, also, there appears to be a good chance that it will decrease as the bulb ages a little. Plus, I should simply get more used to the image I'm seeing over time. (That and the fact that I must quit making them happen on purpose hahaha). Other possible remedies, if needed at some point in the future= try to tone down the brightness a little (move the projector further away, maybe turn the brightness down in the settings).

Calibration: It sounds like there are no "magic" calibration settings that apply to every situation and that I should just play around with it and get an image that I like. Actually, the image right out of the box already looks pretty darn good to me.
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post #17 of 20 Old 08-17-2014, 12:01 PM
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I'm glad you got this model. In reality the W1070 is a bit better with the setup and short throw always presents an issue which is why there is little (no?) real competition for the 1080ST.

I had a client I installed this model for. The center of the lens was about 1" above the top of the screen and I used the Elite Sable screen. It's very important to have this projector VERY level to ensure a square on-screen image. This is not always easy with a table-top setup, but one you have chosen to pursue, so don't bump or move the projector once it is set in place.

Obviously CNET is way off on their review from what I have heard. This is why you go to Projector Central or Projector Reviews for their take if you can.

The Elite Sable screen I used did not exhibit hot-spotting either, and I think that there are only a few cheap Chinese imported screens or high-gain screens which really are presenting this issue. Standard wide-field white and grey screens have much lower hot-spotting potential. So, you made a good choice with the VAPEX screen option.

Certainly opting for a larger screen based upon your viewing distance makes the most sense. But, based upon room width would likely feel a bit over-crowded and takes away from the overall experience.

I think across the board you will feel like you made a solid decision and will be happy for years to come.

AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology installation in the Washington DC metro area.
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post #18 of 20 Old 08-17-2014, 08:04 PM
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Switching your lamp setting from smart-eco to Eco will dim the image if you need to.
Switching your player's refresh rate over to 50Hz will help diminish rainboweffect in 2D (if your player allows refresh setting in its menu).

The cinema setting will be quite accurate on its own, but you'll still have to adjust brightness and contrast a little to get them spot-on. Usually I think they end up around 52 and 48 if you're using gamma at 2.2, but it can be a little different for each projector.

If you want, I think there's a free burn-to-disk set of calibration patterns on this site somewhere near the top of the calibration forum.
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Simple <$250 dedicated black-fabric theater room, build in a day, takedown in an hour.
Easy $25-40 DIY black/dark-grey ambient-light rejecting screen, grab two things from a local store..mix..roll..done.
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post #19 of 20 Old 08-19-2014, 10:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerriot View Post
However, the CNET review specifically mentions that this projector uses "digital keystone correction" which is another way of saying in order to adjust the image so you're not looking at a trapezoidal rectangle, the projector uses a software solution and it introduces artifacts. Basically it introduces ugly noise around straight lines.

So as the reviewer put it, people wanting to put this projector on a coffee table are basically presented two unpleasant choices. Watch a trapezoidal image, or deal with the artifacts correcting it introduces.

Not true at all.
As I have a BenQ 1080st projector which sits on a coffee table.
The picture it projects is completely free of artifacts.
It flat out looks great!

Benq W1080ST DLP 3D Projector
Sony BDP-S5200 3D Blu-ray Player
Denon X4000 Receiver
Pioneer SP-FS52 Tower Speaker x 4
Pioneer SP-C22 Center Channel Speaker
PSA XS15se Subwoofer x 2
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post #20 of 20 Old 08-19-2014, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by AV_Integrated View Post
Obviously CNET is way off on their review from what I have heard. This is why you go to Projector Central or Projector Reviews for their take if you can.
That's exactly what I did, BEFORE I decided to order a BenQ 1080st projector.

Benq W1080ST DLP 3D Projector
Sony BDP-S5200 3D Blu-ray Player
Denon X4000 Receiver
Pioneer SP-FS52 Tower Speaker x 4
Pioneer SP-C22 Center Channel Speaker
PSA XS15se Subwoofer x 2
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