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post #1 of 10 Old 06-03-2015, 08:19 AM - Thread Starter
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1080p picture ?

Hello guys,,,

i recently bougth a BENQ 1085ST projector and i am planing to watch movies at 1080p quality.

my main concern right now is my laptop. Should my laptop support 1080p? (it doesn't), will it give the projector a 1080p quality picture?


Thanks
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post #2 of 10 Old 06-03-2015, 09:10 AM
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You should throw your laptop away and get a Blu-ray Disc player and go to Netflix.

Streaming content doesn't touch Blu-ray (BD) quality. Cable TV doesn't touch BD quality.

Your laptop may very well support 1080p if it has a HDMI output. Just because your laptop screen isn't 1080p, doesn't speak to the output from the HDMI connection on the laptop. Just shut off the laptop screen and only use the HDMI output, the resolution should default to 1920x1080 on any laptop from the last few years.

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post #3 of 10 Old 06-03-2015, 09:49 AM
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I agree, bit rate plays a major role along with resolution. BD has a very nice bit rate that keeps the picture feeling smooth, so use BD if you're wanting to see the best quality your projector can output. Otherwise, as stated, the HDMI out of your laptop should support 1080p, though whether or not the laptop can decode fast enough to give you a smooth experience is another matter. I personally would opt for a home theater PC.
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post #4 of 10 Old 06-03-2015, 09:58 AM
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Originally Posted by AV_Integrated View Post
You should throw your laptop away and get a Blu-ray Disc player and go to Netflix.

He could always get a usb Blu-ray drive for his laptop pretty cheap if he does not already have one built in. Or even rip the disc to an ISO and transfer it to the laptop over a network if he has another computer with a Blu-ray drive somewhere.
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post #5 of 10 Old 06-03-2015, 12:02 PM
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The problem with using a computer to play bluray is all the software is garbage, and they force you to buy a new version every 1.5 years by not updating the security libraries for old software, so that new blurays won't play. The way around it is to by AnyDVD HD, but that's a fairly expensive option.

You could also go the pirated route, but that still creates an issue with whichever route you take software-wise.


It is much cheaper and easier to just buy a dedicated bluray player, that's what I did. If you use a laptop/computer for streaming stuff like Netflix, make sure to have Windows 8, Netflix doesn't stream 5.1 sound in Windows 7. At least last I heard.
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post #6 of 10 Old 06-03-2015, 12:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Xilpaxim View Post
The problem with using a computer to play bluray is all the software is garbage, and they force you to buy a new version every 1.5 years by not updating the security libraries for old software, so that new blurays won't play.

I would have to disagree with you for the most part. Software options today are very robust and fairly inexpensive, often giving a better experience than a dedicated player. Also, computers will tend to have significantly more power behind them than any dedicated player.


I have never come across a software that forced you to pay to upgrade to support new Blu-ray discs. Every option I have tried has always auto updated with full support to play back any disc I bought. I did just upgrade to the latest PowerDVD package recently after using the same version for the last 6 years, and only because it offered new features that I found worthwhile.


Complexity is subjective. I would say having one device that can be a master of all media is a better option than multiple dedicated devices. Also, getting a Blu-ray drive and software will be cheaper than buying a decent dedicated player.
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post #7 of 10 Old 06-03-2015, 12:44 PM
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The problem being, the OP doesn't know enough about his laptop it seems to understand what an extended desktop may mean, whether his PC actually supports 1080p or not. He likely doesn't know about ripping discs, or what software is out there. The PC adds noise to the room typically through fans, and a dedicated HTPC has a significant cost associated with it. It also needs a 10 foot interface for best results which can be used by the entire family, which isn't always easily accomplished.

None of these should be deterrents to someone who wants to go down that path, but just observations.

A decent BD player can be had for under $100.

Add a Roku for under $100 as well and you have your streaming content covered as well as your BD playback.

Since BD players are generally purpose built for BD playback exclusively, I'm not sure that it's accurate to say that 'giving a better experience' is true with software playback. BD players are designed for BD playback. They do it extremely well for the most part. In fact, the cheapest Sony players tend to be very quick at loading, starting, and controlling disc playback through the included remote control and a single HDMI cable to the A/V receiver as the only requirement. Maybe a network cable for firmware updates (automatic). It's really easy for end users to go this route and get great results, without worrying about the rest.

But, as I said, it depends on the comfort level of the OP.

I've not found a HTPC solution I like yet, but I want one which can integrate my BD ISOs into a media wall solution with automatic lookup and integrated (BDISO) playback from the base application. Not sure that exists yet.
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post #8 of 10 Old 06-03-2015, 01:41 PM
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A 3D wifi BR player with smart apps (netflix etc.) can be had for under $60 shipped to your door. (Manufacturer refurbished) It will cost about that for a USB BR player plus at least $60 for powerDVD and the laptop would have to support HDMI 1.4 for 3D play back. I say a Standalone BD player beats a HTPC for cost and convenience hands down.
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post #9 of 10 Old 06-03-2015, 02:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rekbones View Post
A 3D wifi BR player with smart apps (netflix etc.) can be had for under $60 shipped to your door. (Manufacturer refurbished) It will cost about that for a USB BR player plus at least $60 for powerDVD and the laptop would have to support HDMI 1.4 for 3D play back. I say a Standalone BD player beats a HTPC for cost and convenience hands down.
I always recommend a Roku, because the internal apps on most BD players are very weak. If you read the reviews on Amazon for ANY BD player, look at the 1-star ratings and 90% of them will only talk about the streaming, the Wi-Fi, and the failure of these apps to live up to the expectations of end users. Roku is ground up designed for this, so (IMO) is far more ideal to handle web-content delivery. Then just use the BD player to be a BD player.

Roku1: $50 - http://www.amazon.com/Roku-Streaming...&keywords=roku
Wired BD player: $50 - http://www.amazon.com/Sony-Bdps1200-...ay+disc+player

So, $100 to cover pretty much all the content that most people will want to have access to.

Have some networked stuff you want to access?
WDTV: $60 - http://www.amazon.com/Western-Digita...ern+digital+tv

So much good stuff for so little money.

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post #10 of 10 Old 06-04-2015, 05:19 AM
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I agree, HTPC's can range from a couple hundred to thousands, it just depends on your use. Mine is a quad core i7 with 32 gigs of ram, 2 RAID 10's of SSD's, and a top of the line video card all in a full size server case. However, I built mine for gaming, there is nothing better than playing your favorite games at full 1080p (including emulated console games) with a lot of anti-aliasing. Likewise, this makes a killer media player allowing for some of the best upscaling you can achieve (lanczos resampling with a large number of steps) as well as warpsharp filters which can work wonders on upscaled animated content. If you're a fan of frame interpolation, you can even find generic implementations of various algorithms. Essentially a HTPC is a highly customizable media player.
With that said though, it is a bit technical in nature, the other solutions like the roku are engineered specifically to be user friendly for similar (but limited) purposes.
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