Uneducated MythTV Frontend Question - Page 2 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Baselworld is only a few weeks away. Getting the latest news is easy, Click Here for info on how to join the Watchuseek.com newsletter list. Follow our team for updates featuring event coverage, new product unveilings, watch industry news & more!


Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #31 of 52 Old 07-30-2012, 10:13 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Timothy Whatley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevedawg85 View Post

I'm pulling my hair out configuring my Prime w/ Mythbuntu. I'm reading the latest Mythtv .25 might be why, so I went to .24 and stil no luck. I'm going to install Ubuntu 12.04 as you have and hope that solves my problems.
But I have a few questions if you don't mind:
  • What version of Mythtv you using?
  • Are you using XBMC - Mythbox? What version of XBMC? and how long does it take to change channels?
  • Are you using SchedulesDirect or find an alternate (free) one?

I'm using a separate backend (fc15) and frontend (mythbuntu). Both are running MythTV .25 (backend is 0.25-6; frontend is 0.25.2-9). Only using MythTV--XBMC is not used.

The tuner setup for the HDHR was pretty straightforward though mythtvsetup on the backend machine following this wiki: http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/Configuring_MythTV_for_the_HDHomeRun_Prime

I am using SchedulesDirect. Was a little disappointed at first that I had to pay a small fee on top of the cablecard, but, oh well. That setup was also straightforward.
Timothy Whatley is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #32 of 52 Old 07-31-2012, 07:51 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Timothy Whatley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I also thought I'd mention that for the HDHR, make sure you have the latest firmware installed: http://www.silicondust.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2484

I believe there can be/are issues if you happen to be using old/stock firmware.
Timothy Whatley is offline  
post #33 of 52 Old 08-12-2012, 09:40 AM
AVS Special Member
 
tux99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Europe
Posts: 1,523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by tux99 View Post

I like that mobo more and more, I'm tempted to get it for some project soon.
If I get this mobo I will provide you my sensors.conf for it once I figure it out.

I have this mobo now, too.



With regards to lm-sensors to get better output you need to load the it87 kernel module with the following command (as root, or using sudo):

modprobe it87 force_id=0x8721

(see also: http://lists.lm-sensors.org/pipermail/lm-sensors/2012-February/035373.html)

This will then give you the following output when running 'sensors':
Code:
# sensors
k10temp-pci-00c3
Adapter: PCI adapter
temp1:       +39.2°C  (high = +70.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)  

it8721-isa-0290
Adapter: ISA adapter
in0:         +0.56 V  (min =  +2.29 V, max =  +2.70 V)   ALARM
in1:         +2.22 V  (min =  +1.74 V, max =  +2.62 V)   
in2:         +2.94 V  (min =  +2.58 V, max =  +2.28 V)   ALARM
+3.3V:       +3.31 V  (min =  +4.37 V, max =  +5.04 V)   ALARM
in4:         +2.22 V  (min =  +3.00 V, max =  +0.72 V)   ALARM
in5:         +2.98 V  (min =  +2.82 V, max =  +1.90 V)   ALARM
in6:         +2.22 V  (min =  +2.20 V, max =  +2.24 V)   
3VSB:        +3.36 V  (min =  +4.54 V, max =  +1.44 V)   ALARM
Vbat:        +3.29 V
fan1:        870 RPM  (min =   11 RPM)
fan2:          0 RPM  (min =   19 RPM)  ALARM
temp1:       +30.0°C  (low  = +62.0°C, high =  -9.0°C)  ALARM  sensor = thermistor
temp2:       +35.0°C  (low  =  -9.0°C, high = +79.0°C)  sensor = thermistor
temp3:        -8.0°C  (low  = -75.0°C, high = +87.0°C)  sensor = thermistor

This raw output still needs some work with an appropriate 'sensors.conf' file, I will post mine in the next few days when I have worked it out.

My temps are currently a lot lower than yours because I'm currently using a slow spinning 80mm fan that's sitting directly on top of the cpu heatsink, but I tested it fanless before too and it was running fine just like yours.


My Linux news / reviews / tips+tricks / downloads web site: http://www.linuxtech.net/
tux99 is offline  
post #34 of 52 Old 08-12-2012, 02:22 PM
AVS Special Member
 
tux99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Europe
Posts: 1,523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Ok, here is my /etc/sensors3.conf for the Asus C60M1-I:
Code:
# lm-sensors config for Asus C60M1-I board

chip "it8721-*"

   label  in0   "Vcore"
   ignore in1
   label  in2   "+12V"
   ignore in4
   label  in5   "+5V"
   ignore in6

   compute  in2  @ * (50/12), @ / (50/12)
   compute  in5  @ * (205/120), @ / (205/120)
   compute  temp1 @ + 10, @ - 10

   label fan1 "CPU Fan"
   label fan2 "Chassis Fan"

   label temp1 "CPU Temp"
   label temp2 "MB Temp"
   ignore temp3

   set in0_min   0.5
   set in0_max   1.5
   set in2_min  12   * 0.95
   set in2_max  12   * 1.05
   set in3_min   3.3 * 0.95
   set in3_max   3.3 * 1.05
   set in5_min   5   * 0.95
   set in5_max   5   * 1.95
   set in7_min   3.3 * 0.95
   set in7_max   3.3 * 1.05

   set temp1_min 0
   set temp1_max 70
   set temp2_min 0
   set temp2_max 60

   set fan1_min 0
   set fan2_min 0

chip "k10temp-*"

   label temp1 "CPU Temp"

The only thing I wasn't sure about is temp1, but it appears to be tracking CPU temp - 10C, so I have configured it like that, but I guess you could as well ignore it as the k10temp module already provides the CPU temp.

This is the output I get when using the above config file (after a couple of hours at idle, this time WITHOUT a fan):
Code:
k10temp-pci-00c3
Adapter: PCI adapter
CPU Temp:    +53.0°C  (high = +70.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)  

it8721-isa-0290
Adapter: ISA adapter
Vcore:       +0.56 V  (min =  +0.50 V, max =  +1.50 V)   
+12V:       +12.25 V  (min = +11.40 V, max = +12.60 V)   
+3.3V:       +3.31 V  (min =  +3.14 V, max =  +3.46 V)   
+5V:         +5.10 V  (min =  +4.76 V, max =  +5.23 V)   
3VSB:        +3.36 V  (min =  +3.14 V, max =  +3.46 V)   
Vbat:        +3.29 V
CPU Fan:       0 RPM  (min =    0 RPM)
Chassis Fan:   0 RPM  (min =    0 RPM)
CPU Temp:    +53.0°C  (low  =  +0.0°C, high = +70.0°C)  sensor = thermistor
MB Temp:     +38.0°C  (low  =  +0.0°C, high = +60.0°C)  sensor = thermistor

My Linux news / reviews / tips+tricks / downloads web site: http://www.linuxtech.net/
tux99 is offline  
post #35 of 52 Old 08-15-2012, 08:47 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Timothy Whatley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
awesome, thanks. i'll give this a try tonight, hopefully.

i started building out my main htpc. i have everything in place but the cpu (i3-2105), but i ordered that this morning so i should have it by the weekend.

i'm going fanless on the i3-2105 too...




found a heatsink/fan with a lot of surface area, removed the fan and cut down the heatsink so it'd fit in the case.

should be fine since there are 2 120mm fans right next to it that'll be blowing the heat away, but the 120mm fans are practically silent.

hopefully the i3-2105 is enough by itself. if not, at least i have the room to toss in a gt520.
Timothy Whatley is offline  
post #36 of 52 Old 08-15-2012, 08:57 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Timothy Whatley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
actually.. just tossed your sensors code in... thanks again... my output...
Code:
k10temp-pci-00c3
Adapter: PCI adapter
CPU Temp:     +50.2°C  (high = +70.0°C)
                       (crit = +100.0°C, hyst = +97.0°C)

it8721-isa-0290
Adapter: ISA adapter
Vcore:        +0.74 V  (min =  +2.95 V, max =  +1.49 V)  ALARM
+12V:        +12.15 V  (min =  +6.75 V, max = +12.75 V)
+3.3V:        +3.34 V  (min =  +4.20 V, max =  +5.88 V)  ALARM
+5V:          +5.10 V  (min =  +3.92 V, max =  +4.51 V)  ALARM
3VSB:         +3.38 V  (min =  +1.51 V, max =  +3.05 V)  ALARM
Vbat:         +3.31 V
CPU Fan:      579 RPM  (min =   17 RPM)
Chassis Fan:    0 RPM  (min =   10 RPM)  ALARM
CPU Temp:     +46.0°C  (low  =  +6.0°C, high = -55.0°C)  ALARM  sensor = thermistor
MB Temp:      +34.0°C  (low  = +121.0°C, high = +63.0°C)  sensor = thermistor
intrusion0:  ALARM

this machine has been running constantly since i got it.
Timothy Whatley is offline  
post #37 of 52 Old 08-15-2012, 02:50 PM
AVS Special Member
 
tux99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Europe
Posts: 1,523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timothy Whatley View Post

actually.. just tossed your sensors code in... thanks again... my output...
Code:
k10temp-pci-00c3
Adapter: PCI adapter
CPU Temp:     +50.2°C  (high = +70.0°C)
                       (crit = +100.0°C, hyst = +97.0°C)
it8721-isa-0290
Adapter: ISA adapter
Vcore:        +0.74 V  (min =  +2.95 V, max =  +1.49 V)  ALARM
+12V:        +12.15 V  (min =  +6.75 V, max = +12.75 V)
+3.3V:        +3.34 V  (min =  +4.20 V, max =  +5.88 V)  ALARM
+5V:          +5.10 V  (min =  +3.92 V, max =  +4.51 V)  ALARM
3VSB:         +3.38 V  (min =  +1.51 V, max =  +3.05 V)  ALARM
Vbat:         +3.31 V
CPU Fan:      579 RPM  (min =   17 RPM)
Chassis Fan:    0 RPM  (min =   10 RPM)  ALARM
CPU Temp:     +46.0°C  (low  =  +6.0°C, high = -55.0°C)  ALARM  sensor = thermistor
MB Temp:      +34.0°C  (low  = +121.0°C, high = +63.0°C)  sensor = thermistor
intrusion0:  ALARM
this machine has been running constantly since i got it.

I see you added a slow running fan to it, maybe it's a good precaution to make the board live longer, but IMHO it's not strictly necessary, mine has been running for a few days now without a fan and it stays around 50-53C which is absolutely fine for this CPU.

BTW, rerun "sensors -s" that should get rid of those false alarms on your output.

My Linux news / reviews / tips+tricks / downloads web site: http://www.linuxtech.net/
tux99 is offline  
post #38 of 52 Old 08-15-2012, 08:59 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Timothy Whatley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by tux99 View Post

I see you added a slow running fan to it, maybe it's a good precaution to make the board live longer, but IMHO it's not strictly necessary, mine has been running for a few days now without a fan and it stays around 50-53C which is absolutely fine for this CPU.
BTW, rerun "sensors -s" that should get rid of those false alarms on your output.

ah... that's a bit misleading. i plugged my slow turning exhaust fan at the top of the case into the cpu fan input--that's been there since i assembled the htpc. still no fan on the cpu heatsink itself (no plans for one either).
Timothy Whatley is offline  
post #39 of 52 Old 08-16-2012, 03:49 PM
Newbie
 
ericmn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 9
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by tux99 View Post

I wouldn't recommend that, standard MLC based SD cards will wear out quickly when used as OS disk (I know someone who tried it and the SD card died after only 3 months)

This is pure FUD. Your friend had a bad card or did something dumb. Think about all the Android devices in the world doing exactly this.

In addition, the mythtv frontend doesn't even have to write to the local disk.. You can boot it off of CD (Knoppmyth) if you want.
ericmn is offline  
post #40 of 52 Old 08-17-2012, 01:04 AM
AVS Special Member
 
tux99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Europe
Posts: 1,523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericmn View Post

This is pure FUD. Your friend had a bad card or did something dumb. Think about all the Android devices in the world doing exactly this.
In addition, the mythtv frontend doesn't even have to write to the local disk.. You can boot it off of CD (Knoppmyth) if you want.

This is not FUD at all, it's a fact. A normal desktop OS writes quite a lot of logging and temporary files on the disk/flash while a mobile OS like Android is optimised to minimise writes. Sure you can optimise a standard desktop Linux to minimise writes too (which is what you get when you use a live CD as that one keeps all writable stuff in RAM), but few people do that.
Also there are many different qualities of MLC flash chips, if you are unlucky the flash cells of a cheap USB stick might already start dying after a few dozen writes.

My Linux news / reviews / tips+tricks / downloads web site: http://www.linuxtech.net/
tux99 is offline  
post #41 of 52 Old 08-17-2012, 07:04 AM
Rgb
AVS Special Member
 
Rgb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: SE Michigan
Posts: 6,896
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timothy Whatley View Post

found a heatsink/fan with a lot of surface area, removed the fan and cut down the heatsink so it'd fit in the case.
should be fine since there are 2 120mm fans right next to it that'll be blowing the heat away, but the 120mm fans are practically silent.
hopefully the i3-2105 is enough by itself. if not, at least i have the room to toss in a gt520.

You cut through the heat pipes? Did you re-seal them?
Rgb is offline  
post #42 of 52 Old 08-17-2012, 10:01 AM
Newbie
 
ericmn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 9
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by tux99 View Post

This is not FUD at all, it's a fact. A normal desktop OS writes quite a lot of logging and temporary files on the disk/flash while a mobile OS like Android is optimised to minimise writes. Sure you can optimise a standard desktop Linux to minimise writes too (which is what you get when you use a live CD as that one keeps all writable stuff in RAM), but few people do that.
Also there are many different qualities of MLC flash chips, if you are unlucky the flash cells of a cheap USB stick might already start dying after a few dozen writes.

This is total crap. If modern flash were as fragile is you keep claiming, there is no way Microsoft would have incorporated ReadyBoost into Vista and Windows 7. ReadyBoost is a feature that ships with the OS to use a USB/CF/SD drive as cache.

Microsoft research claims 10+ years of life for a flash drive in this scenario, and that was 6 years ago.
http://blogs.msdn.com/b/tomarcher/archive/2006/06/02/615199.aspx
ericmn is offline  
post #43 of 52 Old 08-17-2012, 01:58 PM
AVS Special Member
 
waterhead's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,295
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 12
I have been using SD and SDHC cards for Linux installs for quite some time. I have never had any problems with this method.

I had been using the ext2 file system to minimize the read/writes. But I recently read that the ext4 file system is good for flash drives. I also do not make a swap partition on flash drives, I just make sure I have lots of RAM. I also disable hibernation too.
waterhead is offline  
post #44 of 52 Old 08-17-2012, 03:46 PM
AVS Special Member
 
tux99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Europe
Posts: 1,523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericmn View Post

This is total crap.

Clearly you are the expert and your argument is so convincing that I have nothing further to say. rolleyes.gif
(I know better than feeding trolls!)

My Linux news / reviews / tips+tricks / downloads web site: http://www.linuxtech.net/
tux99 is offline  
post #45 of 52 Old 08-21-2012, 12:16 PM
Newbie
 
ericmn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 9
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rgb View Post

You cut through the heat pipes? Did you re-seal them?

This is a really important point. Heatpipes rely on an internal fluid that cyclically boils and condenses. Opening them up ruins them. Also, densely packed fins perform poorly without forced airflow, and even worse when mounted horizontally. If you want passive cooling, you are off with an extruded heatsink in a highly ventilated case.
ericmn is offline  
post #46 of 52 Old 08-27-2012, 09:12 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Timothy Whatley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericmn View Post

This is a really important point. Heatpipes rely on an internal fluid that cyclically boils and condenses. Opening them up ruins them. Also, densely packed fins perform poorly without forced airflow, and even worse when mounted horizontally. If you want passive cooling, you are off with an extruded heatsink in a highly ventilated case.

unfortunately, the abbreviated research i did before getting too anxious to get out the hacksaw didn't reveal this little tidbit. there was another issue as well--the heatsink did not sit fully on the cpu. fortunately, i was suspect of my setup so i booted right into the bios and monitored the temps immediately. after seeing it reach 70c pretty quickly i shutdown and discovered the gap. i was going to write a wtf email to the heatsink maker but after learning of this do not cut the heatpipes info, i'm too embarrassed to and will chock this up as $40 lost.

i ended up using the stock i3 heatsink/fan but i cut off the stock fan and screwed a 80 to 120mm adpater and 120mm fan on it..... still silent and works fine. temps never reach 40c.

but, i did also pick up a gt520 for this setup too... i was determined to use the i3 hd3000 graphics but after a few days of headache i threw in the towel and figured it'd be easier to just get another gt520. worked fine and had the system fully setup within an hour. well worth another $30.

no more cable boxes in my house.
Timothy Whatley is offline  
post #47 of 52 Old 09-03-2012, 06:02 AM
AVS Special Member
 
blackcat6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Charlotte
Posts: 1,461
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 248 Post(s)
Liked: 61
I find it easier to use fans and simply solder a resister on the power line to reduce the voltage. (cover it with heat shrink tubing) Almost any fan can be made close to silent by this method and once it's in the case you will never hear it over the ambient noise. It's a lot easier than trying to deal with heat sinks and the advantage is that you can leave it under thermal control of the mobo so it can be sped up if needed. By using this method, you can build a fairly powerful FE that is also small and very quiet. (without breaking the bank)

I have also found that newer GT 430s or GT 630s with a fan and radial heat sink are almost silent as well. They are more than capable of handing any video and for Live TV, they are not pushed hard enough to speed up their fans. Fan adjustments can be made from the Nvidia driver.


On the above discussion about using SSDs with Linux, keep in mind that for MythTV, where it should not be necessary to log as you would for a general purpose system, there should be no problem with simply mounting /tmp and /var/log into memory disk. This minimizes writes to the drive itself and is recommended even if you use a mechanical disk. Ext4 if fine if you use the noatime option.
blackcat6 is offline  
post #48 of 52 Old 09-03-2012, 07:52 AM
AVS Special Member
 
waterhead's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,295
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackcat6 View Post

I have also found that newer GT 430s or GT 630s with a fan and radial heat sink are almost silent as well. They are more than capable of handing any video and for Live TV, they are not pushed hard enough to speed up their fans.
Generically, I have found that video card fans to be of low quality, and the first fan to go bad. They then make noise, if they don't stop working all together. These fans are also hard to find replacements for, unless you get one that is so huge it covers up an extra slot. Again, this is not specific to the GT cards, but a general experience of mine.
waterhead is offline  
post #49 of 52 Old 09-03-2012, 04:54 PM
AVS Special Member
 
blackcat6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Charlotte
Posts: 1,461
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 248 Post(s)
Liked: 61
^If those fans start making noise, it's pretty easy to take the blade assembly off and place a miniscule drop of light oil onto the bearing. Easiest done with a toothpick.
blackcat6 is offline  
post #50 of 52 Old 09-03-2012, 06:30 PM
AVS Special Member
 
waterhead's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,295
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackcat6 View Post

^If those fans start making noise, it's pretty easy to take the blade assembly off and place a miniscule drop of light oil onto the bearing. Easiest done with a toothpick.
They're usually cheap sleeve bearings. By the time they start making noise, it is too late. Oil will only quiet it for a short time.

Been there, done that.
waterhead is offline  
post #51 of 52 Old 09-04-2012, 07:09 AM
AVS Special Member
 
tux99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Europe
Posts: 1,523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterhead View Post

Generically, I have found that video card fans to be of low quality, and the first fan to go bad. They then make noise, if they don't stop working all together. These fans are also hard to find replacements for, unless you get one that is so huge it covers up an extra slot. Again, this is not specific to the GT cards, but a general experience of mine.

Very true, that's why I only ever buy fanless graphics cards (since I'm not a gamer I don't need fast graphics cards anyway).

My Linux news / reviews / tips+tricks / downloads web site: http://www.linuxtech.net/
tux99 is offline  
post #52 of 52 Old 09-26-2012, 11:55 AM
AVS Special Member
 
EricN's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 1,305
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 100 Post(s)
Liked: 219
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackcat6 View Post

I find it easier to use fans and simply solder a resister on the power line to reduce the voltage. (cover it with heat shrink tubing)

If you are already busting out the soldering iron to quiet your fans, you may consider spending the extra dollar and ten minutes to go this route:

http://www.techpowerup.com/forums/showthread.php?t=107135

It'll save you about 1 watt of heat generation for an average 80mm fan. Not much, but it's one less watt that needs cooling.
EricN is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply HTPC - Linux Chat

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off