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post #3781 of 3807 Old 09-08-2014, 04:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grigorianvlad View Post
Tweeter fuses burnt out on both speakers after a few hours. I replaced them. Now since my current Emotiva XPA-5 provides 300W into 4 ohm and blew the fuses, does that make buying the Emotiva XPA-2 (500W) unnecessary? Meaning if the fuses were destroyed by a weaker amp, a more powerful amp will not contribute anything to the set up.

Thanks
It's quite difficult to blow out Maggie tweeter fuses with clean power. But even a little clipping will blow them out quickly (a clipped signal floods the speakers with HF). NAD's "soft clipping" has kept my tweeter fuses intact for years while I used to blow them regularly with my previous amp equipment (a Yamaha receiver, preceded by Soundcraftsman amps, preceded by a Crown integrated amp).

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post #3782 of 3807 Old 09-08-2014, 04:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cctvtech View Post
It's quite difficult to blow out Maggie tweeter fuses with clean power. But even a little clipping will blow them out quickly (a clipped signal floods the speakers with HF). NAD's "soft clipping" has kept my tweeter fuses intact for years while I used to blow them regularly with my previous amp equipment (a Yamaha receiver, preceded by Soundcraftsman amps, preceded by a Crown integrated amp).
Thank you, cctvtech, but I am not sure i understand this concept of "clean" power. Are you saying that some amps supply such power and others dont? I thought watts, ohms and amperes are all calculated by a formula that that excludes any such notions (as clean or dirty power).

Am I wrong? Thank you again


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post #3783 of 3807 Old 09-08-2014, 05:51 PM
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Vlad?

Modern audio equipment starts out delivering reasonabe-to-very clean power, from the cheapest amps to the most expensive. However, every piece of equipment has its limits. Take a look at the signals below:



The bottom one is "clean", while the top one is clipped. Notice the peaks are cut off. Clipped signals have an excess high frequency component and will burn out fuses or even speakers.



Since you state it took several minutes before your fuses blew, I would guess that the level of clipping was moderate, since severe clipping would blow the fuses quickly. Clipping usually happens in the power amplifier circuitry when the signal exceeds the amplifier's supply voltage (it's more complicated than that but close enough). Every amplifier can clip; even ones capable of delivering thousands of watts. All it takes is for the signal to exceed the amplifier's capability.

That's not to say clipping can't happen in other parts of the chain, just that it's more likely to happen in the power amp circuit. Preamps, signal sources,, even mp3's can clip. In fact, many media is often mastered with excessive signal levels. On a CD or mp3, the excess high frequencies are often beyond the reproduction equipment's range and are not passed on to the preamp/amp circuitry but I would guess that some sources (SACD?) have the bandwidth.

In essence, it doesn't matter how much you spend on a system, you could still encounter clipping if you turn the volume control too high. Over-driven sources just amplify the problems (pun intended).

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post #3784 of 3807 Old 09-08-2014, 07:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cctvtech View Post
Vlad?

Modern audio equipment starts out delivering reasonabe-to-very clean power, from the cheapest amps to the most expensive. However, every piece of equipment has its limits. Take a look at the signals below:



The bottom one is "clean", while the top one is clipped. Notice the peaks are cut off. Clipped signals have an excess high frequency component and will burn out fuses or even speakers.



Since you state it took several minutes before your fuses blew, I would guess that the level of clipping was moderate, since severe clipping would blow the fuses quickly. Clipping usually happens in the power amplifier circuitry when the signal exceeds the amplifier's supply voltage (it's more complicated than that but close enough). Every amplifier can clip; even ones capable of delivering thousands of watts. All it takes is for the signal to exceed the amplifier's capability.

That's not to say clipping can't happen in other parts of the chain, just that it's more likely to happen in the power amp circuit. Preamps, signal sources,, even mp3's can clip. In fact, many media is often mastered with excessive signal levels. On a CD or mp3, the excess high frequencies are often beyond the reproduction equipment's range and are not passed on to the preamp/amp circuitry but I would guess that some sources (SACD?) have the bandwidth.

In essence, it doesn't matter how much you spend on a system, you could still encounter clipping if you turn the volume control too high. Over-driven sources just amplify the problems (pun intended).
Thanks. I have a lot of questions for you. Let me read the reply tomorrow (very tired now) and then ask them. Appreciate it


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post #3785 of 3807 Old 09-09-2014, 09:15 AM
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that is very clearly explained, thank you. I like a lot of treble and Maggies are rather shy at low volume. So, I boost treble which sounds fine at moderate and low volume, but terrible when loud. So it was boosted by almost 8dB when the fuses blew.


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post #3786 of 3807 Old 09-09-2014, 12:47 PM
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I'm in general agreement with cctvtech, might expand on a couple of things.

Clipping rarely happens in the treble, it is usually the bass. And the spectrum is such that clipping does not add as much power to the tweeter as many believe, though it will add some. How much depends on the fundamental frequency. The third harmonic is at 1/3 the voltage (1/9 the power, -9.5 dB), the fifth is 1/5 the voltage (1/25 the power, -14 dB), and so forth. Too much power in the tweeter, clean or not, will blow the fuse. If you cranked the treble by 8 dB, you were already running the mid/tweeter pretty hot (8 dB = 6.3 times the nominal power). If you turned up the volume you could well have been clipping the amp (3 dB is twice the power, 6 dB takes 4 times the power, and 10 dB louder, which sounds twice as loud, will require 10 times the power). Ribbon tweeters, found on the upper models, will blow before the fuse can protect them. And is worth noting that the tweeter panel, ribbon or not, is usually a little lower in impedance than the bass or midrange panels, so you have been putting more power (and clipping sooner) than you expected.

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley

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post #3787 of 3807 Old 09-09-2014, 01:03 PM
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Originally Posted by spyderphil View Post
This is my first post here so be kind! Have been a consumer of several years of threads and it's helped me get this far with great satisfaction - thanks guys. I can't see the same question has been asked to hope to solicit some ideas from Magnepan / Rythmik users.

I have a 25x18x10 room with Maggie 1.7's, CC5, MC1 hinge mounted. Power is via Emotiva XPA-1's and a XPA-3. I'm using a Parasound p7 with a Oppo-BDP105 as a pre-amp/source. Music / Movies is about 50:50 though I am much more critical when listening to 2-channels. Clarity and detail is fantastic. I'm looking to add some low end and possibly a larger soundstage. I have been in touch with Rythmik and they recommend a couple of F15's which would seem logical. The E15's with the higher power and high gloss finish look like they'll also do the trick.

I note that 20.1's used are now available for $5.5K or thereabouts so I wondered if I buying a set of these wouldn't actually achieve quite a lot of what I'm looking to do with the Rythmik's? I realize they wont go as low as a sub but perhaps close enough plus give me that larger presentation? I could always add a single sub later.

Can anyone comment? Would I lose any of the detail the 1.7's bring?

Thanks in advance,
Phil
The 20's might give you a larger soundstage due to their larger panel area, and of course they will play a little deeper and have a true ribbon tweeter. They also use "push-pull" magnets (both sides) instead of the single magnet layer used for the rest of the line. They should fit well in that room. That said, Maggies, and planer speakers (dynamic or ESL) in general, lack excursion and require a lot of area to play deep. I am biased since I have a pair of Rythmiks, but I found ages ago that Magnepans (and other planers) distort heavily with deep bass, and of course are limited in volume and frequency response on the low end. For those reasons I have had a sub with my Maggies since the early 80's. Back then I designed my own, using a servo circuit similar to what Rythmik uses today.

With that as background, I would use a sub no matter what planer I had, excepting some of the hybrid systems (and maybe even then to help even out the bass response in the room as the position of the mains is rarely the best position for the subs). With that premise, I would get the subs now and see how things sound with the 1.7's rolled off up around 80 Hz or so for starters. IME good subs provide much better bass (you don't know what you're lacking until you get it back) and taking the low-end load off the panels helps reduce the distortion and preserve amplifier headroom for the rest of the range.

If the 20's are in good shape and you still want larger panels, then I would grab them, but I would try the sub first.

IME/IMO/etc. - Don

p.s. The soundstage, especially in an untreated room, is highly dependent upon speaker position. You might play with toe-in and moving them around a little at a time, listening for the differences. You can also swap tweeter in/out and see if you prefer one way.

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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post #3788 of 3807 Old 09-09-2014, 02:25 PM
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Spyderphil: I think the 1.7s are an amazing speaker system for the price, plus they are far less dominate looking than my 3.6s or especially the 20.1s. I also think a quality sub, such as the sealed Rythmiks are an outstanding choice. I was going to audition the Rythmik, but the model I wanted had a 6 months backlog on orders at the time. I went with the SB13-Ultra from SVS (small, elegant and powerful) and haven't looked back.

By all means try a subwoofer before making a final decision. Both Rythmik and SVS offer trial periods. The Rythmik for 30 days and SVS for 45 days (plus free shipping back). And if PSA is still offering their summer special (free shipping both ways) you might try their XS15se or XS30se sealed designs.
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post #3789 of 3807 Old 09-09-2014, 07:32 PM
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Thanks Don and dsrussell - much appreciate you both taking the time to comment. I was already leaning toward giving the subs a go so I think you have both confirmed that's a good path. As suggested Don, I'll spend more time with moving the 1.7's around to optimize the sound-stage.

I'll do some more thread reading on how to do this but if you have any comments on if it's better to do that with the subs in the system or before (then add and adjust the subs) that would be useful. Currently, the speakers are set up on long wall (25') and the listening position is 12' from the wall with speakers pulled 4' out.

I'm going to the 2 x E15's in gloss black and see how that works. I thought the Maggies were an absolute steal for the price v.'s sound but putting the right components around them to make them sing is payback !
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post #3790 of 3807 Old 09-09-2014, 09:49 PM
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^^ I think it's best to get your 1.7s setup first to give you the best sound from your mains at your listening position. It gives you a solid base to go from. No one knows where the best location for a subwoofer will be. Only the subwoofer knows, and it will tell you. But that requires you to do a subwoofer crawl test to find out that best location(s). Adding a second subwoofer will help smooth out room modes and give you perhaps a larger listening area and afford you at least 3 dB of additional output (6 dB if they are mutually coupled … i.e. placed fairly close to each other). However, placing that second sub can be rife with problems. People think they can just plop down a second sub and everything will be peaches-and-cream. And some have had great success by placing them diagonally in the room (opposite walls / corners). Unfortunately, a second sub can cause phase issues and cancellation problems. And dialing them in is not exactly easy. It may take a microphone and REW software to be successful. But once you dial them in, you'll have an impressive setup.

All that being said, I chose to use only one subwoofer, since it gave me the sound I was seeking at the listening position (which made things very easy for me).

Now Don uses two Rythmiks, and will be able to give you more concise info than I on how to setup your system. But since all rooms are different, you will need to take that into consideration as well.
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post #3791 of 3807 Old 09-10-2014, 05:52 AM
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+1. Soundstage issues are above sub frequencies. Dial in the mains then deal with the subs. Very small tweaks (few inches or less change in toe-in or distance apart, from wall, from listener) can make quite a difference in the sound of dipole speakers, especially in an untreated room. I usually start with the speakers toed-in to fire at the listener, then tweak out an inch or so at a time. Adjusting the distance apart also has a big effect on soundstage IME.

Sub placement is a subject best dealt with in the subwoofer forum. It is, or can be, a rather complicated subject.

HTH - Don

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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post #3792 of 3807 Old 09-10-2014, 06:29 AM
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Are you guys with subs setting the maggies to small even when you're listening to music, or just for movies?
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post #3793 of 3807 Old 09-10-2014, 06:54 AM
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I would set them to small else bass management is not engaged and the sub would not be used. I used a sub long before AVRs were around and only for music. I really wish they had used "Bass Management ON/OFF" instead of "Small/Large" for that feature...

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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post #3794 of 3807 Old 09-10-2014, 01:08 PM
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Like Don, I'm a bit old-school. I run my Maggies with a stereo amplifier/preamplifier combo (no AVR, so no bass management). I spent a lot of time using my sub's low and high-pass filters, with slope management (along with my ears and a dB meter) to get where I wanted to be.
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post #3795 of 3807 Old 09-11-2014, 08:31 PM
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Hi guys , it has been a year since i have my 1.7 and i have been very happy with them. No other speakers i have had or audition had been able to give me that sense of realism and presence . I have them in a very small room 12 x 10 x 7.2 driven by a Denon AVR 3805 and fed by Mac ---- Audirvana Plus ---- 24/96 , 16/44.1 files.
Even though i am very happy with the set up i decided i wanted to see if i could improve the sound mainly for imaging , depth , impact and detail retreival.
First , i decided to add a sub a month ago , a Martin Logan Dynamo 700 with crossover at 40 Hz. Although it was very dificult to integrate , i finally with the help of the Denon automatic room calibration tool and after trying many positions, volume levels etc i could make it sound right. The next thing i did was to see if i could change the electronics to drive them ( separates ) but even though the Denon it is not the fanciest of the equipment it delivers 230 Watts at 4 Ohms and is equiped with a Burr Brown 24/192 dac wich i think is good enough. I read a lot but couldn't be sure if investing in electronics were going to give me the improvement i was looking for , so i decided to learn something about room treatment and at first i thought it was the answer for my desire to improve the sound , but now i am not sure if that is the route to take .
The problem is that as i live in Colombia i can't try equipment nor room treatments to hear if they can make a difference and i have to take my decisions based only on what i read .
That's why I would like to hear your opinion and advice since you have more experience .
I attached some pictures so you can have a better idea.
Thanks in advance,
Carlos




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post #3796 of 3807 Old 09-12-2014, 05:02 AM
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Manzano 804

Great to hear from you again….we spoke a while ago! What a beautiful, comfortable, cozy, and intimate room you have! I am glad you are happy with your 1.7's.

May I make a suggestion? I have been in a number of recording studios that damped the strings of a piano when that piano was not being used in a session. The reason given was to prevent sympathetic ringing. I am a sound editor for television and movies and I also have an upright piano in my home editing room. My room is small and cozy too, although not as inviting as yours! I also damp my piano strings when playing back over my work monitors (my Music/Movie/Enjoyment room is separate).

I have seen many variations of the same theme concerning how to damp a piano. Usually, it is a sand filled "snake" that stretches the width of the strings and soundboard. It is placed upon or against the strings. The diameter is about 3 to 4 inches. The material can be anything but it is always flexible and soft. I have seen cloth with a plastic lining on the inside. I have seen pliable plastic, and I have seen small pillows neatly arranged. The "snake" is sealed at both ends. I suppose you don't want to have a leak and spill sand all about! At home I use small soft pillows that when gently placed do a great job of damping the stings/soundboard.

If I do not damp my piano it will "sing and hum" along gently when I playback over my studio monitors. The instant I hit stop on my Pro tools I hear my piano softly ringing behind me. My piano is 8 feet behind me from my work seat….giving you an idea how loud my particular piano "sings". If I am working and do not damp the piano during playback the sound of my work is "befuddled", lacking clarity and focus. Damping the piano brings a good measure of clarity and focus.

If you are interested try this experiment. Playback some music in your room at a moderate to loud volume. Put your ear near the piano and have someone pause the playback. If you hear the piano "singing and humming" then you should damp the piano when you are enjoying your Maggies. The benefits you will hear if you compare damped piano to undamped piano should be fairly obvious. Damping should yield greater clarity, focus, image body, and sound stage solidity. Your cozy room magnifies the effect of sympathetic ringing. You might just love the improvement!

Oh one last thing….If your piano is electronic and not acoustic (I can not tell from the photos) then …… never mind!

Oh and another last thing….you can remove the piano from the room! But don't scratch those beautiful floors!!!

And on another last note, pun intended, you guys made a great run in the World Cup! Congratulations! The result against Brazil was unfortunate.

Glad you are well…...

Magnepan 1.7's (LR)
Magnepan CC5/DWM (Center Channel)
Magnepan MC1's (Surrounds)
Rythmik F12 (Sub)
Emotiva UMC-1 (Processor)
Emotiva XPA-2 Gen2 Drives the 1.7's
Emotiva XPA-5 Drives the Center and Surrounds
Oppo BDP-103

Last edited by stustan; 09-12-2014 at 08:32 AM.
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post #3797 of 3807 Old 09-12-2014, 05:54 AM
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Originally Posted by stustan View Post
Manzano 804

Great to hear from you again….we spoke a while ago! What a beautiful, comfortable, cozy, and intimate room you have! I am glad you are happy with your 1.7's.

May I make a suggestion? I have been in a number of recording studios that damped the strings of a piano when that piano was not being used in a session. The reason given was to prevent sypathetic ringing. I am a sound editor for television and movies and I also have an upright piano in my home editing room. My room is small and cozy too, although not as inviting as yours! I also damp my piano strings when playing back over my work monitors (my Music/Movie/Enjoyment room is separate).

I have seen many variations of the same theme concerning how to damp a piano. Usually, it is a sand filled "snake" that stretches the width of the strings and soundboard. It is placed upon or against the strings. The diameter is about 3 to 4 inches. The material can be anything but it is always flexible and soft. I have seen cloth with a plastic lining on the inside. I have seen pliable plastic, and I have seen small pillows neatly arranged. The "snake" is sealed at both ends. I suppose you don't want to have a leak and spill sand all about! At home I use small soft pillows that when gently placed do a great job of damping the stings/soundboard.

If I do not damp my piano it will "sing and hum" along gently when I playback over my studio monitors. The instant I hit stop on my Pro tools I hear my piano softly ringing behind me. My piano is 8 feet behind me from my work seat….giving you an idea how loud my particular piano "sings". If I am working and do not damp the piano during playback the sound of my work is "befuddled", lacking clarity and focus. Damping the piano brings a good measure of clarity and focus.

If you are interested try this experiment. Playback some music in your room at a moderate to loud volume. Put your ear near the piano and have someone pause the playback. If you hear the piano "singing and humming" then you should damp the piano when you are enjoying your Maggies. The benefits you will hear if you compare damped piano to undamped piano should be fairly obvious. Damping should yield greater clarity, focus, image body, and sound stage solidity. Your cozy room magnifies the effect of sympathetic ringing. You might just love the improvement!

Oh one last thing….If your piano is electronic and not acoustic (I can not tell from the photos) then …… never mind!

Oh and another last thing….you can remove the piano from the room! But don't scratch those beautiful floors!!!

And on another last note, pun intended, you guys made a great run in the World Cup! Congratulations! The result against Brazil was unfortunate.

Glad you are well…...
Stuart , is also nice to hear from you after a year , you are very kind as always , and i am very grateful with you and DonH50 cause you gave me the confidence to buy the Maggies and i am happier than ever. All those worries about having them in a small room like mine and the lack of resolution at low listening levels are gone. So thanks again for your advice.
About your suggestion, i had never considered about damping the piano (it is acoustic ) but i will follow your advice and hear what happens.
The imaging, depth and soundstage i have now are excellent but you know that in this hobby one always try to improve. That's why i have been considering to change electronics or treat the room , however i am not sure if i am going to have an improvement.
I don't even know if my room needs treatment although i have read that all rooms need it if one wants to have a great sound , and about electronics i dont know either if investing more will improve the sound i already have since i listen at low level volume.
So what do you think ? Out of the Piano treatment , you think that i should try something else or i should stay as i am now ?
I know is a difficult question since you don't know how my room sounds but any suggestion will be useful.
Best regards,
Carlos

That Brazil match was a shame ! But they did a wonderful job !! We couldn't have been happier here although it would have been great if they could have gone further .

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post #3798 of 3807 Old 09-12-2014, 11:37 AM
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Manzano,

The room does look a little "hard". By that I mean the floor walls and ceiling are likely sources of sound reflection. I would bet that anything you can do to soften it would help.

One simple tool I use to see if a room is hard is just to whistle. If there is a very distinct echo, the room is "hard".

Be seeing you!
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post #3799 of 3807 Old 09-12-2014, 12:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cctvtech View Post
Manzano,

The room does look a little "hard". By that I mean the floor walls and ceiling are likely sources of sound reflection. I would bet that anything you can do to soften it would help.

One simple tool I use to see if a room is hard is just to whistle. If there is a very distinct echo, the room is "hard".
Thanks for your opiinion.
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post #3800 of 3807 Old 09-12-2014, 01:32 PM - Thread Starter
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You can experiment with room treatments fairly cheaply if you want. The following link contains some information on different types of absorption materials. You should be able to find some of these in Columbia. Get some 1/8" or 1/4" mdf or plywood to mount them on so you can easily hang them on a wall and go. If you find something you want, you can buy some acoustically transparent material or bulk speaker cloth and wrap them so they look better. This should be a cheaper alternative to buying ready made acoustic panels.

http://www.atsacoustics.com/page--Se...erial--ac.html

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post #3801 of 3807 Old 09-12-2014, 03:42 PM
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You can experiment with room treatments fairly cheaply if you want. The following link contains some information on different types of absorption materials. You should be able to find some of these in Columbia. Get some 1/8" or 1/4" mdf or plywood to mount them on so you can easily hang them on a wall and go. If you find something you want, you can buy some acoustically transparent material or bulk speaker cloth and wrap them so they look better. This should be a cheaper alternative to buying ready made acoustic panels.

http://www.atsacoustics.com/page--Se...erial--ac.html
Thank you . Unfortunately here i found something similar but only 1" thick with poor rates of absorption and are very expensive . So i am in the fence to buy a box of 6 OC 703 FRK , 2 to make bass traps with the foil facing the room and the others to absorbe in the first reflection points , the box is cheap $ 150 shipped to Miami , but because of the weigh ( 62 pounds ) , shiiping and taxes to Colombia are like $ 250 wich seems very expensive to me , that's why i have also considered ATS foam bass traps and panels wich are light weigh but i have read that they aren't as good as fiberglass at low frequencies. I was finally thinking to buy 2 single OC 703 FRK for bass traps plus ATS foam panels for the first reflection points.
The truth is that i don't know if it is going to be a right choice that's why , i am open to listening opinions before i buy them.
Thanks a lot.
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post #3802 of 3807 Old 09-12-2014, 05:08 PM
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If you're looking to soften your room, there is plenty of rug art that can be hung on the wall that can reduce unwanted reflections. Just pick out a design that appeals to your aesthetic sense and try it out. Should be able to grab a piece for around 30 or 40 bucks. If it doesn't help, you can either keep it on your wall because you like it, or take it back.

If one wants or needs a lot more dampening, I'd expect some cheap foam sheets wrapped in material could work fairly well. Anyway, think cheap and think local, so you can take it back.
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post #3803 of 3807 Old Yesterday, 11:13 AM
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If you're looking to soften your room, there is plenty of rug art that can be hung on the wall that can reduce unwanted reflections. Just pick out a design that appeals to your aesthetic sense and try it out. Should be able to grab a piece for around 30 or 40 bucks. If it doesn't help, you can either keep it on your wall because you like it, or take it back.

If one wants or needs a lot more dampening, I'd expect some cheap foam sheets wrapped in material could work fairly well. Anyway, think cheap and think local, so you can take it back.
Thanks for your suggestions .
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post #3804 of 3807 Old Yesterday, 11:30 AM
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What do they use to insulate the walls in Colombia? You can use a few inches of most any insulation to reduce HF reflections, and it takes a LOT of inches of anything to absorb LF signals. I'd look at local building supply stores or something like that and just get some to try. A roll of the pink stuff a few inches thick is a decent start for HF absorption. You can just hang it to see if it helps, then cover it up or make it pretty later.

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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What do they use to insulate the walls in Colombia? You can use a few inches of most any insulation to reduce HF reflections, and it takes a LOT of inches of anything to absorb LF signals. I'd look at local building supply stores or something like that and just get some to try. A roll of the pink stuff a few inches thick is a decent start for HF absorption. You can just hang it to see if it helps, then cover it up or make it pretty later.
This weekend i found some fluffy fiberglass they use to insulate , so i am going to try it , based on the specs it looks very promising.
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post #3806 of 3807 Old Yesterday, 07:29 PM
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Go for it!

"After silence, that which best expresses the inexpressible, is music" - Aldous Huxley
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post #3807 of 3807 Old Today, 02:03 PM
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Parallel 2.7 Maggies and Polk LSiM 705s Configuration

Well, boys, after a month of playing with my 2.7s I decided they are lacking. So, I have configured them to run them in parallel to my Polk 705s.

Both Maggies and the Polk 705s are playing the same signal (L/R), but split at preamp RCA out and amplified by different power amp channels (shown in one of the pics).

You may ask "why"? Why go through all this trouble and not just use the Maggies alone.
In my humble opinion, Maggies are missing the slam factor. They dont rock. True, they produce extremely clean and quick transients—such as those of plucked acoustic guitar strings or percussion instruments. The sound seems to start and stop suddenly, just as one hears from live instruments. Ribbons sound vivid and immediate without being etched or excessively bright. In addition, the sound has an openness, clarity, and transparency often unmatched by dynamic drivers. (Incidentally, these qualities are shared by expensive ribbon microphones.) Finally, the ribbon’s dipolar nature produces a huge sense of space, air, and soundstage depth (provided this spatial information was captured in the recording). Nevertheless, put on Pink Floyd's "In the Flesh" and you can play it very loud , but you will not feel the punch in the chest. In addition, some of the instruments seem to be muted in different recordings (even the same instruments; for example a piano in a Chopin CD sounds delightful, but in WIll Duta's Parergon it is five miles away from the recording microphone). That is not the case with Polks.
The Polks (LSiM 705s) are equally great at some things, but not others. They midrange is simply addicting. I actually dreamed of their midrange - go ahead and laugh, but that is true!. It is so articulate, clear and pronounced that sometimes I think it isnt that pronounced in real life (during recording). The LSiM 705s have a lot to offer: excellent clarity, outstanding power handling, true full audio range reproduction.
But they have their own shortcomings, just like the Maggies do. First off this box sound coloration and small imaging. They sound fine until you've experienced Maggies. Then you will find the 705's sound small , like all vocals are being performed by Chip & Dale. I am reducing to the absurd here, but you get the point. On the other hand, if you have never heard planar speakers, you may never even be a ware of this shortcoming.
So, what Maggies offer, the Polks dont. What the Polks are good at, the Maggies cant play because of their design (this slam factor, for example, I felt it at reference level EVEN with the bookshelf 703s!). This makes them perfect to play together without stepping on each other's toes and at the same time preserving their own strengths.
At low volume Maggies are quiet and just humming along, almost imperceptibly making the sound bigger. But above -30 they open up and start singing along with the 705s. They add air and space to the Polk's sound, making instruments and vocals more palpable, alive, present.
I was afraid that their tweeters would clash. And they did. But all I had to do is to bring treble down by 3dB and it all came together.
The Emotiva has no problem carrying this double load (4 speakers instead of 2, the 705s are 8ohm and Maggies are 4ohm sometimes dipping down to 2ohm). I went all the way up to -10 (20dB still available) and there were no issues whatsoever. I am sure there would have been , if not for the subs. Now, this -10 volume sound like +10 - because of the Maggies vast irradiative surface.
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