Sonance speaker opinions - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 10-15-2010, 03:05 PM - Thread Starter
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Hi all -

My father in law is building a new place and the builders A/V sub is really pushing Sonance speakers for his dedicated theater setup and whole house audio. I cannot find much about them and was wondering (hoping) someone could speak up. Good or bad - I'd appreciate any and all input...

Thanks!
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post #2 of 8 Old 10-15-2010, 03:38 PM
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They are a very well known and widely used brand for home installs. Like most companies, they make some good products and some less good products. I have used them from time to time. I wouldn't have used them if I didn't think they were good speakers. (Though I also wouldn't have bought them for myself, but then I am really difficult to please, especially when I'm spending money.)

For the homeowner, they can offer good sound and build quality, if you choose the right speakers. They also offer a full line of speakers, and seem likely to be around forever, which means service, repair, replacement, additional speakers, etc. will be available down the line. Those are important considerations. Though of course other companies offer that as well.

If you want the absolute best sound, then you need to do more work. Though lots of people say they do, but really don't, or won't pay for it.

For the installer, they are a line that is not typically available to consumers directly, although that is changing. That means they don't have to compete with Amazon or Best Buy, and can make enough money to cover the complexities of the install. Consumers are often reluctant to just pay the cost of the install, the way they would with an electrician or a plumber. I guess because they think they can do it themselves. So the AV installer tries to sell speakers and other gear that they can make a margin on.

You could learn a tremendous amount by doing a Google search.

As always, the bottom line is whether the installer is capable and can be trusted. If you can find out - ideally references from people you know (and that can be the general contractor if you trust them and they have real experience with the AV sub) - that's the most important thing to know. Funny how it always comes back to that, eh?
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post #3 of 8 Old 10-15-2010, 05:47 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzy_ View Post

They are a very well known and widely used brand for home installs. Like most companies, they make some good products and some less good products. I have used them from time to time. I wouldn't have used them if I didn't think they were good speakers. (Though I also wouldn't have bought them for myself, but then I am really difficult to please, especially when I'm spending money.)

For the homeowner, they can offer good sound and build quality, if you choose the right speakers. They also offer a full line of speakers, and seem likely to be around forever, which means service, repair, replacement, additional speakers, etc. will be available down the line. Those are important considerations. Though of course other companies offer that as well.

If you want the absolute best sound, then you need to do more work. Though lots of people say they do, but really don't, or won't pay for it.

For the installer, they are a line that is not typically available to consumers directly, although that is changing. That means they don't have to compete with Amazon or Best Buy, and can make enough money to cover the complexities of the install. Consumers are often reluctant to just pay the cost of the install, the way they would with an electrician or a plumber. I guess because they think they can do it themselves. So the AV installer tries to sell speakers and other gear that they can make a margin on.

You could learn a tremendous amount by doing a Google search.

As always, the bottom line is whether the installer is capable and can be trusted. If you can find out - ideally references from people you know (and that can be the general contractor if you trust them and they have real experience with the AV sub) - that's the most important thing to know. Funny how it always comes back to that, eh?

thanks buzzy! I appreciate the feedback.
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post #4 of 8 Old 10-16-2010, 07:43 AM - Thread Starter
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Bump for the weekend folks. Any additional opinions and or experiences?

Thanks
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post #5 of 8 Old 10-16-2010, 08:13 AM
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if you can i would take a walk down to your nearest bb and look at the moderno's since they are made by sonance and see if he likes them or not...


The most important piece i would ask though is what are the goals and what TYPE of sound are you looking for... sometimes in walls just dont cut the mustard no matter how much you spend...
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post #6 of 8 Old 02-23-2011, 12:50 PM
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I read avsforum when looking for kit, but am poor on giving back. I'm not an enthusiast, I enjoy listening to music and researching this fascinatingly subjective religion.

My home has a 40'W x 12'D open great room (9' ceilings) with hardwood floors, a fireplace and lots of windows as canvas. The 3 entryway's with a bump-out design makes this room feel like it's got a 14'W x 12'D x 9'H family room, a 12'W x 14'D (bumped-out) x 9'H dining/computer area, and a 14'W x 12'D x 9'H kitchen.

In the notional family room, I have 5 Sonance in-ceiling speakers: three 822TR's for L/C/R and two 622R surrounds. I have Sunfire HRS-12 for sub. I drive them with a Denon 90 wpc A/V receiver (2007 purchase - like today's 891?).

All the technical reasons for going with in-ceiling application still exist, but I should have avoided it. For the money spent (5 speakers, 1 sub, avr + drywall work), it's difficult to hear voices (tv/movies) at normal listening levels ("normal" means not waking my 2-yr old; -30dB on my Denon). Perhaps I should re-Audessey (spelling?) but I have bigger fish to fry.

1) I'm tortured that I put in-ceiling speakers directly below where my 2-yr old now sleeps. The back-cans from Sonance + lots of pink insulation don't help much.
2) Voices are not clear/fast/articulate when I'm sitting 11' away from speaker and on a couch where my head is at 4' vertical while speaker is 9' suspended in ceiling
3) mid-highs sound good at all listening levels; mid-bass sounds good when turned up loud
4) The HRS-12 is far too boomy for my tastes and capabilities. No matter where I cross it (60; 80; 90), I can't get it to cooperate and sound fulfilling. I hear lots of rumbling, but it sounds like the cabinet is rumbling, not the room or my chest. I can't blame the sub necessarily, since it sits in the corner of my room (top-left on floor, 5' feet from the tv) on a hardwood surface, hidden by a chair and surrounded by large windows.

I realize this might be entirely unhelpful, but in summary I felt I needed in-ceiling so spent lots of energy trying to implement a Sonance/HRS solution. I'm not happy with the solution because I paid more money for less sound for the compromise of home theater my wife would be happy to 'OK'. It turns out I'm more critical a listener than I had initially thought...and I wasn't planning on baby #2. I'd also say that I am really quite happy with mid-range and most highs when listening to music and tv/movies once I can turn this system up beyond -25dB on my Denon. The sound seems slightly warm, which appeals to me and my taste for electric blues & rock.
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post #7 of 8 Old 02-23-2013, 04:51 AM
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Thanks for taking the time. I think I will keep my in-ceiling expectations and budget low and go with more typical setup for my high fidelity needs. Thx again.
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post #8 of 8 Old 02-23-2013, 07:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by awdiophreak View Post



I realize this might be entirely unhelpful, but in summary I felt I needed in-ceiling so spent lots of energy trying to implement a Sonance/HRS solution. I'm not happy with the solution because I paid more money for less sound for the compromise of home theater my wife would be happy to 'OK'.
+1. If you want a sound system that sounds like a restaurant by all means go with ceiling speakers. That's probably OK in the kitchen, or in bedrooms if you want a whole house system, but for anything considered 'serious' listening they're not going to cut it.

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