Polk LSi9, ohms and receivers help. - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 02-25-2012, 09:25 PM - Thread Starter
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I started a thread about this in receivers and was directed here so away we go.

I think im in over my head, I picked up a used pair of Polk LSi9 (4ohm). My old onkyo (705) receiver needs to be updated anyway so I was thinking I would go ahead and get a new reciever to go with these speakers. Im a bit of a novice in this so I had no idea that the 4 ohm speakers would be a big deal. After looking at home theater receivers I have found only a few go to 6 ohm and almost none in my 1000 dollar price range go to 4 ohm.

One of the receivers I looked at was a Yamaha RX-A1010, now Yamaha says that this receiver will run two 4 ohm speakers in 6 ohm mode. I have no clue if I should just sell these speakers back to the guy or if I will be ok running a receiver in 6 ohm mode.

This setup will be used mostly for listening to vinyl and gaming with a few movies in between so I need an all in one receiver with 3d tech. These LSi's were to be an upgrade from my current monitor 50 series.

Any help or direction would be greatly appreciated.
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post #2 of 7 Old 02-25-2012, 11:48 PM
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You may want to consider an amp to drive the LSi9s, probably better bang for the buck. I am using an Anthem MCA-2 for mine, but I am only using them for music. You've got a good receiver, are you upgrading for HDMI 1.4?

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post #3 of 7 Old 02-26-2012, 06:07 AM
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Running TWO 4 ohm speakers will not be a problem with a high-quality receiver that has a good power supply.

If you tried to run 5 of them all at once it would be.

It is all about the total current available from the power supply that is needed to run the speakers.

Most receivers do not have enough power supply current available to run 5 low-impedance speakers, so they steer you away from them.

Denon receivers, according to the published tests in Home Theater magazine, are much better in this respect than many others.

I suggest that you consider the Denon AVR-891 receiver, which Amazon has for $800. You should have no problems using it, as long as you make sure that you only run two 4-ohm speakers and the rest are 8 ohms. It has a 135 watt rating for the front channels at 6 ohms, so it will have enough current to do the job.





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Originally Posted by Superunkn0wn View Post

I started a thread about this in receivers and was directed here so away we go.

I think im in over my head, I picked up a used pair of Polk LSi9 (4ohm). My old onkyo (705) receiver needs to be updated anyway so I was thinking I would go ahead and get a new reciever to go with these speakers. Im a bit of a novice in this so I had no idea that the 4 ohm speakers would be a big deal. After looking at home theater receivers I have found only a few go to 6 ohm and almost none in my 1000 dollar price range go to 4 ohm.

One of the receivers I looked at was a Yamaha RX-A1010, now Yamaha says that this receiver will run two 4 ohm speakers in 6 ohm mode. I have no clue if I should just sell these speakers back to the guy or if I will be ok running a receiver in 6 ohm mode.

This setup will be used mostly for listening to vinyl and gaming with a few movies in between so I need an all in one receiver with 3d tech. These LSi's were to be an upgrade from my current monitor 50 series.

Any help or direction would be greatly appreciated.

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post #4 of 7 Old 02-26-2012, 07:08 AM
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a suggestion would be to buy a dayton apa150 power amp at parts express onsale $128.it will give you 75 watts per channel at 4 ohm 2 channel just hook up to your avr and your set.by the way great speakers

i'm so laid back,i'm laid out
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post #5 of 7 Old 04-11-2012, 10:02 PM
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The Yamaha A1010 can drive 4 ohm speakers (two, in front), it says so in the manual, in fact (they say you should put it on a 6 ohm setting and it will run 4 ohm speakers). However, I agree with others here that using a real external amp is a good idea. I doubt a super low end amp will be any better than the A1010 directly driving it (especially since you can bi-amp the front speakers with the A1010, and that should give quite adequate power)... but I personally am driving my Lsi9's with an NAD C 326BEE amp ($550) which is rated at 50 watts/channel but in reality can burst up to 100 watts/channel and it sounds incredibly good with the Lsi9's. The A1010 has a nice clean preamp output that works well with the NAD.

I've read really good things about Yamaha's own integrated amp, the A-S500, and WhatHiFi came out with a stellar review. I can't vouch for it myself, though; I listened to it at J&R and it sounded quite blah --- but that's probably because J&R's listening room was set up really badly, with poor wiring, speaker connections, etc. The NAD on the other hand I auditioned at an audiophile shop and it sounded truly awesome --- so I got one brought it home hooked it to my A1010 and haven't looked back.

I should try hooking my Lsi9's to my A1010 in biamp mode just to see how the A1010 fares driving these speakers without the NAD. But the NAD/Lsi9 combo is truly spectacular and I doubt the A1010 alone is going to really be at the same level.
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post #6 of 7 Old 04-11-2012, 11:14 PM
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Okay, I did it: I hooked up my Lsi9's directly, using the bi-amp mode, to the A1010, bypassing the NAD amp. The difference was very noticeable. The A1010 was clearly capable of driving the Lsi9's, but it was much more labored; the sound was much less clear, less dynamic. Less detail. Sounded a bit more harsh, less smooth and musical. Overall, it worked; but the NAD C 326BEE adds hugely to the overall quality.

Right now I just drive my small 8-ohm rear speakers with the A1010, and it sounds quite good when all it has to do is drive those two speakers, leaving the hard work to the NAD for the front channels.
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post #7 of 7 Old 04-12-2012, 01:54 AM
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Your receiver has pre-outs on the back, this allows you to connect an external power amp. I use a 4-channel pro amp, the Art SLA-4 as a power amp for my L/C/R. It produces 140W into 4ohms all 4 channels driven continuous. All you need is this 1/4 to rca cable, single rca out per channel, single 1/4 in on the amp. In the future all you have to worry about is finding a receiver with pre outs, you will always have the amp power you need.
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